The Golden Bowl by Henry James, NOOK Book (eBook) | Barnes & Noble
The Golden Bowl (Barnes & Noble Digital Library)

The Golden Bowl (Barnes & Noble Digital Library)

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by Henry James
     
 

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American innocence and European sophistication provide the backdrop for this story of adultery, jealousy, and possession. A young heiress is engaged to be married, as is her widowed father. But both father and daughter are unaware that their respective betrotheds share a secret—one for which everyone involved must pay the price.

Overview


American innocence and European sophistication provide the backdrop for this story of adultery, jealousy, and possession. A young heiress is engaged to be married, as is her widowed father. But both father and daughter are unaware that their respective betrotheds share a secret—one for which everyone involved must pay the price.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781411443358
Publisher:
Barnes & Noble
Publication date:
03/15/2011
Series:
Barnes & Noble Digital Library
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
548
File size:
634 KB

Meet the Author


Henry James (1843-1916) was born in America but after forty years in England became a British subject in 1915.  A consummate prose stylist and innovator, possessed of acute psychological discernment, James took the art of the novel to rarefied heights in such masterworks as The Turn of the Screw and The Golden Bowl, helping to pioneer literary realism.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
April 15, 1843
Date of Death:
February 28, 1916
Place of Birth:
New York, New York
Place of Death:
London, England
Education:
Attended school in France and Switzerland; Harvard Law School, 1862-63

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The Golden Bowl 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The most subtle of James' collection, the last of his major phase (dictated not written), with the least dialogue of all his works, James accomplishes what many writers of literature strive for but never reach -- sustained ascending climax until the very last line of the very last page, what Edmund Wilson would have described as not a periodic sentence but a periodic novel (where the meaning is revealed not in the beginning or middle but at the very end). Yet many still will find it a difficult steep climb to make with great distances of exposition between two lines of character dialogue. Keep in mind James wrote at the turn of the twentieth century, his style reflecting back on the long prose of his 19th century predecessors rather than anticipating the short and concise sentences provided by the modern generation of writers to come. EM Forster, Edith Wharton, contemporaries of James, wrote with airier prose that moves if not at a faster pace (for James' sentences roll together forward like a smooth quick current), then less-heavily weighed down by looping syntax and meanings intimated but not directly communicated to the reader.
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