Golden Domes and Silver Lanterns: A Muslim Book of Colors

Golden Domes and Silver Lanterns: A Muslim Book of Colors

4.5 9
by Hena Khan, Mehrdokht Amini
     
 

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Magnificently capturing the colorful world of Islam for the youngest readers, this breathtaking and informative picture book celebrates Islam's beauty and traditions. From a red prayer rug to a blue hijab, everyday colors are given special meaning as young readers learn about clothing, food, and other important elements of Islamic culture, with a young Muslim girl as

Overview

Magnificently capturing the colorful world of Islam for the youngest readers, this breathtaking and informative picture book celebrates Islam's beauty and traditions. From a red prayer rug to a blue hijab, everyday colors are given special meaning as young readers learn about clothing, food, and other important elements of Islamic culture, with a young Muslim girl as a guide. Sure to inspire questions and observations about world religions and cultures, Golden Domes and Silver Lanterns is equally at home in a classroom reading circle as it is being read to a child on a parent's lap. Plus, this version includes audio and a read-along setting.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In this picture book, Khan (Night of the Moon: A Muslim Holiday Story) immerses young readers in “deen”—the Muslim way of life. Each spread portrays a Muslim custom, clothing style, or religious tenet and links it to a color used throughout the scene. “Red is the rug Dad kneels on to pray” exemplifies the accessible mix of tradition (prayer rugs) and modernity (colloquial English) the author uses throughout the book. The emphases are both the particulars of Islam and the universal concerns of all caring societies and religions—devotion; helping the poor through “zakat,” or money for charity; exchanging gifts at the holiday of Eid. Amini’s (The Faerie Door) illustrations apply lush and muted jewel tones to images and scenes from domestic and religious life in a contemporary Muslim culture. Scenes of street life and home life hold architectural detail and textile patterns and attract second and third looks. Arabic terms are woven into the text, some explained directly, some by context, making the book suitable for children of all faiths. A glossary provides additional information. Ages 3–7. (June)
Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
Simple rhymed couplets describe colors involved in Muslim traditions and customs, including some vocabulary. A young girl kneels with her father on a red rug as he prays five times a day. Her mother wears a blue hijab, or scarf. They admire the gold dome of the mosque. Her grandpa wears a white kufi, or traditional hat. She uses black ink to draw the letters that spell Allah. We see the brown dates, her favorite Ramadan treat, and the orange henna that decorates her hands. On Eid she receives a purple-wrapped gift, and puts money in a yellow box "for those in need." She reads a green Quran and admires a silver lantern. All these things are part of her deen, or faith. Double-page scenes depict the traditional objects and their setting. Each has the young girl, sometimes with others, in a typical activity. The environment is rendered naturalistically; the humans stylized and somewhat doll-like, with large eyes and smooth features. The colors are used to emphasize but not overplay the characteristics. The end pages are a riot of colors in a design suggestive of Middle Eastern mosaics. There is a useful glossary. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
Kirkus Reviews
A sophisticated color-concept book featuring a contemporary family introduces Islam to young Muslims and children who don't practice this faith. Here the basic colors, plus gold and silver, are used to explain aspects of Islamic life. A young girl with very large eyes narrates, using short, childlike and occasionally forced verses to match colors and objects: "Gold is the dome of the mosque, / big and grand. / Beside it two towering / minarets stand." She describes a red prayer rug, her mom's blue hijab (headscarf), white kufis (traditional men's woven hats), black ink for a calligraphic design, brown dates for Ramadan, orange henna designs, an Eid gift of a doll with a purple dress, a yellow zakat (charity) box, a green Quran (green has special significance in Islam, not explained here), and a silver fanoos, "a shiny lantern." The glossary is excellent, explaining unfamiliar terms succinctly. The stylized illustrations, richly detailed, often play with the sizes of the objects in a surrealistic way. It is difficult to tell whether the family lives in the Middle East, Britain (home of the artist) or North America. The secular architecture looks Western, but the mosque looks very grand and Middle Eastern. The clothing styles are difficult to associate with a particular country. This both maximizes accessibility and deprives the tale of specificity--clearly a conscious trade-off. A vibrant exploratory presentation that should be supplemented with other books. (Picture book. 4-7)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781452122052
Publisher:
Chronicle Books LLC
Publication date:
07/20/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
32
File size:
15 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.
Age Range:
3 - 7 Years

Meet the Author

Hena Khan's first picture book, Night of the Moon: A Muslim Holiday Story, was a 2009 Booklist "Top 10 Religion Book for Youth". She lives in Rockville, Maryland, with her husband and sons.
Mehrdokht Amini has illustrated 11 books for children. She grew up in Iran and now lives in Surrey, England.

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Golden Domes and Silver Lanterns: A Muslim Book of Colors 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
MZM1 More than 1 year ago
This book is amazing! Schools and anybody with children should have this book in their library. The illustrations are beautiful and it's an easy read. I would recommend this book to anybody.
fsaleem More than 1 year ago
Golden Domes and Silver Laterns is so well written, and the illustrations are stunning. Hena Khan does a wonderful job of bringing simple concepts to extraordinary life. We cannot wait for her next book!!
farinzs More than 1 year ago
My 10 month old literally smiles and squeals with delight when I pull this book out to read. The illustrations are large and beautiful and I love to see the smile on his face as we turn each page. I would highly recommend this book to anyone with a child who you're trying to foster the love of reading. No matter what their religion, this is a must have for any young library.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Love the book. It introduces simple aspects of Muslims believes with lovely drawings and easy rhyming words. I think it is a great book to introduce our kids to the Muslim culture and traditions.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is absolutely amazing! Both my kids, ages 9 and 5, enjoy reading this book. The concept is phenomenal and the illustrations are amazing and this is a MUST for any library. I can't wait to read Hena's next book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
My 2 yr old daughter adores this book. She points to the colors as i read. It is illustrated perfectly and the rhyming couplets create a nice flow which encourage her to chime in. Highly recommend!
arifzafar More than 1 year ago
A beautiful celebration of life that explores some of the colors, shapes and textures of Muslim civilization. The illustrations are vibrant and rich and the words flow like poetry. Hena Khan has done it again with a masterfully written children's book that is accessible, informative and breathtaking.
SZS More than 1 year ago
Golden Domes and Silver Lanterns is a beautifully written and illustrated book. Cultural concepts are portrayed in simple, easy to understand terms, but more important are the emotion and human experience that really come through to readers of all ages. This book has become a favorite of my preschooler AND my middle schooler. I also bought copies for my childrens' school library!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Im the first one to post a comment lol XD