BN.com Gift Guide

The Golden Egg Book

Overview

Once there was a little bunny. He was all alone. One day he found an egg. He could hear something moving inside the egg. What was it?

So begins the Golden Easter classic about a bunny—and a little duck that is about to hatch!

Margaret Wise Brown's enchanting story of a lonely little rabbit who "hatches" a friend comes charmingly to life, enhanced throughout by Weisgard's softly-colored ...

See more details below

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK Kids for iPad

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

Available for Pre-Order
This item will be available on January 6, 2015.
NOOK Book (NOOK Kids)
$3.99
BN.com price
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.

Overview

Once there was a little bunny. He was all alone. One day he found an egg. He could hear something moving inside the egg. What was it?

So begins the Golden Easter classic about a bunny—and a little duck that is about to hatch!

Margaret Wise Brown's enchanting story of a lonely little rabbit who "hatches" a friend comes charmingly to life, enhanced throughout by Weisgard's softly-colored illustrations.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
A pair of rabbit-themed reissues are back just in time to serve as basket treats. The 1947 classic The Golden Egg Book by Margaret Wise Brown, illus. by Leonard Weisgard, returns as a Big Little Golden Book. When a curious bunny finds a blue speckled egg, he tries everything from jumping on it to pelting it with rocks and acorns to find out what's inside. But since a watched egg never cracks, the mystery occupant only emerges at last when the bunny falls asleep. The soft, retro illustrations ably depict the animals' feisty youthful impatience and curiosity. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
A little bunny, all on his own, finds a bright blue egg and wonders what is moving inside. Is it a boy, an elephant, a bunny, a mouse? The bunny pushes, jumps on, throws nuts at the egg, and rolls it down a hill, but it doesn't break. He listens closely and can hear something pecking away, but being a tired little bunny after all that activity he falls asleep next to the egg. It finally cracks and out pops a fuzzy yellow duck. All the things that the bunny did to the egg the duck does to the bunny—he pushes him with his foot, jumps on him, throws a rock and rolls him down a hill, and finally the bunny wakes up. The two become fast friends. "And no one was ever alone again." Young children may be pleased to learn that Margaret Wise Brown did indeed create more stories than Goodnight Moon and this one with its charming illustrations will find a receptive audience. 2004 (orig. 1947), Golden Books/Random House, Ages 1 to 3.
—Marilyn Courtot
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780385384766
  • Publisher: Random House Children's Books
  • Publication date: 1/6/2015
  • Series: Little Golden Book Series
  • Pages: 24
  • Sales rank: 1,073,740
  • Age range: 2 - 5 Years
  • Product dimensions: 6.75 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 0.12 (d)

Meet the Author

MARGARET WISE BROWN (1910-1952), best known as the author of Goodnight Moon, wrote countless children’s books inspired by her belief that the very young were fascinated by the simple pleasures of the world around them. Among her many bestselling Golden titles are The Sailor Dog, The Color Kittens, Mister Dog, Seven Little Postmen, and Home For A Bunny.

Biography

When Margaret Wise Brown began to write for young children, most picture books were written by illustrators, whose training and talents lay mainly in the visual arts. Brown, the author of Goodnight Moon, was the first picture-book author to achieve recognition as a writer, and the first, according to historian Barbara Bader, "to make the writing of picture books an art."

After graduating college in 1932, Brown's first ambition was to write literature for adults; but when she entered a program for student teachers in New York, she was thrilled by the experience of working with young children, and inspired by the program's progressive leader, the education reformer Lucy Sprague Mitchell. Mitchell held that stories for very young children should be grounded in "the here and now" rather than nonsense or fantasy. For children aged two to five, she thought, real experience was magical enough without embellishments.

Few children's authors had attempted to write specifically for so young an audience, but Brown quickly proved herself gifted at the task. She was appointed editor of a new publishing firm devoted to children's books, where she cultivated promising new writers and illustrators, helped develop innovations like the board book, and became, as her biographer Leonard S. Marcus notes, "one of the central figures of a period now considered the golden age of the American picture book."

Though Brown was intensely interested in modernist writers like Gertrude Stein (whom she persuaded to write a children's book, The World Is Round), it was a medieval ballad that provided the inspiration for The Runaway Bunny (1942), illustrated by Clement Hurd. The Runaway Bunny was Brown's first departure from the here-and-now style of writing, and became one of her most popular books.

Goodnight Moon, another collaboration with Hurd, appeared in 1947. The story of a little rabbit's bedtime ritual, its rhythmic litany of familiar objects placed it somewhere between the nursery rhyme and the here-and-now story. At first it was only moderately successful, but its popularity gradually climbed, and by 2000, it was among the top 40 best-selling children's books of all time.

The postwar baby boom helped propel sales of Brown's many picture books, including Two Little Trains (1949) and The Important Book (1949). After the author died in 1952, at the age of 42, many of her unpublished manuscripts were illustrated and made into books, but Brown remains best known for Goodnight Moon and The Runaway Bunny.

More people recognize those titles than recognize the name of their author, but Margaret Wise Brown wouldn't have minded. "It didn't seem important that anyone wrote them," she once said of the books she read as a child. "And it still doesn't seem important. I wish I didn't have ever to sign my long name on the cover of a book and I wish I could write a story that would seem absolutely true to the child who hears it and to myself." For millions of children who have settled down to hear her stories, she did just that.

Good To Know

When Goodnight Moon first appeared, the New York Public Library declined to buy it (an internal reviewer dismissed it as too sentimental). The book sold fairly well until 1953, when sales began to climb, perhaps because of word-of-mouth recommendations by parents. More than 4 million copies have now been sold. The New York Public Library finally placed its first order for the book in 1973.

If you look closely at the bookshelves illustrated in Goodnight Moon, you'll see that one of the little rabbit's books is The Runaway Bunny. One of three framed pictures on the walls shows a scene from the same book.

Brown's death was a stunning and sad surprise. The author had had an emergency appendectomy in France while on a book tour, which was successful; but when she did a can-can kick days later to demonstrate her good health to her doctor, it caused a fatal embolism.

Read More Show Less
    1. Also Known As:
      Golden MacDonald, Juniper Sage, Timothy Hay
    1. Date of Birth:
      May 23, 1910
    2. Place of Birth:
      Brooklyn, N.Y.
    1. Date of Death:
      November 13, 1952
    2. Place of Death:
      Nice, France

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)