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The Golden Goose
     

The Golden Goose

by Brothers Grimm
 

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Here is a classic, comic tale from Grimm about a kind-hearted young man called Simpleton whose generosity is rewarded in strange and wonderful ways.
REVIEWS: "Duntze's large pictures for this Grimm tale include a mixture of pleasing compositions and favor light hues, which give them an airy openness. . . . A fresh-looking interpretation."--Booklist
"Duntze's

Overview

Here is a classic, comic tale from Grimm about a kind-hearted young man called Simpleton whose generosity is rewarded in strange and wonderful ways.
REVIEWS: "Duntze's large pictures for this Grimm tale include a mixture of pleasing compositions and favor light hues, which give them an airy openness. . . . A fresh-looking interpretation."--Booklist
"Duntze's light-filled, surreal illustrations capture well the underlying humor in the tale." --The Reading Teacher

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
This is the classic and beloved tale in which the youngest son, powerless and underappreciated in his family, gains wealth and love through an act of kindness. Smooth and unabridged, the telling carries the full flavor of the original. And as usual, Duntze's stylish illustrations contribute fascinating details, in the characters' expressive faces, the clothing and furnishings, as well as in the beautifully composed settings. A treat for lap-sharing or reading aloud. this would also be an espe cially fine choice for any child's shelf. Ages 6-8. (October)
Children's Literature - Gretchen Hesbacher
The pictures in this tale by the Brothers Grimm are colorful, angular, and comical, making it entertaining to look at and to read. The story itself is fun, with repetitious silly words like, "Hokety pokety stickety stuck," that kids will enjoy. It is the tale of the youngest, simple son who gives some of his stale bread to a little man in the forest when he goes to chop a tree. Previously, his brothers had denied the man cake on their visits to the forest and almost immediately injured themselves. The little man gives the simple son a golden goose for his kindness (giving a very clear picture of the benefit of sharing versus being selfish). As the boy travels, people try to touch the golden goose and become stuck, causing a trail of people to run behind him during his journey. He unknowingly leads the procession to a kingdom of a serious princess. The sight of the procession makes her laugh, and once again with the help of the little old man in the forest, the simple son wins a bride! Though children may miss the lessons of sharing, not touching something that belongs to someone else, and the importance of laughter in relationships, they will surely enjoy the silliness of this book!
School Library Journal
Gr 1-4-- Duntze's rich, stylized watercolors for this well-known tale are an unusual blend that includes folk art and surrealism. They present the story effectively from varied perspectives, although sometimes with a static quality. The simpleton/protagonist is portrayed as a grown booby who plays with toys, but practically everyone in these illustrations appears to be a dolt. The most appealing pictures are those of the simpleton leading the people stuck to the goose and the Holbein-like portraits of the princess and of her and the simpleton at the conclusion. These distinguished illustrations do not equal Leslie Brooke's inimitable ones in his Golden Goose Book-- still available in a reduced format--but they are preferable to others in print (although they may be admired more by adults than by children). The text, unfortunately, seems shaped by the modern view that children must have simple, graceless language in simplified sentences. It is acceptable, but hardly worth reading aloud to children. At least the adaptor has not tampered with the plot and tells the tale complete. --Ronald A. Van De Voorde, Graduate Library School, University of Arizona, Tucson

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780893754778
Publisher:
Troll Communications L.L.C.
Publication date:
06/28/1989
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
7.24(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.09(d)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

After studying at Marburg, Jacob became a clerk in the War Office at Kassel, and in 1808 librarian to Jerome Bonaparte, King of Westphalia. In 1841 he received Professorship at Berlin, and in 1854 began work on Deutsches Worterbuch with his brother.

Anthea Bell (translator) is the recipient of the Schlegel Tieck Prize for translation from German, the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize, and the Helen and Kurt Wolff Prize in 2002 for the translation of W. G. Sebald's "Austerlitz", and the 2003 Austrian State Prize for Literary Translation. She lives in Cambridge, England.

Dorothee Duntze was born in Reims, France. She studied art at the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Reims and the Ecole des Arts Decoratifs in Strasbourg. Among the other books she has illustrated for North-South are The Emperor's New Clothes, The Princess and the Pea, and Hansel and Gretel.

Brief Biography

Place of Birth:
Hanau, Germany
Place of Death:
Berlin, Germany

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