Goldie Is Mad

Goldie Is Mad

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by Margie Palatini
     
 

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Goldie is mad. Mad, mad, mad! Nicholas took her doll, Veronica, and drooled all over her. Now Goldie is in trouble, and she has to think and be sorry. While she's thinking, she has some surprising thoughts about all of the things that she likes about her little brother. Whimsically illustrated, and always true to the heart of a preschooler, Goldie offers a positive

Overview

Goldie is mad. Mad, mad, mad! Nicholas took her doll, Veronica, and drooled all over her. Now Goldie is in trouble, and she has to think and be sorry. While she's thinking, she has some surprising thoughts about all of the things that she likes about her little brother. Whimsically illustrated, and always true to the heart of a preschooler, Goldie offers a positive model for children to follow when they are angry.

About the Author:

Margie Palatini is also the author of Good As Goldie and lives in New Jersey.

Editorial Reviews

Bulletin for the Center of Children's Books
...the perfect choice for preschoolers defining their own position in the family hierarchy.
Children's Literature
Goldie looks like a cousin to Dennis the Menace and she is exploding with childhood rage. Baby Nicholas has taken her doll Veronica and sucked on her hair. Now Veronica's hair is sticky with baby spit. Veronica hates that, so Goldie hates it too. The next step is for Goldie to scream, "I hate Nicholas." Throughout the story Veronica is Goldie's alter ego and the text deals realistically and understandingly with sibling resentment and the depth, as well as the transitory nature of, a toddler's moods. When Veronica and Goldie get a time-out, they are supposed to be sorry for their actions, but they are not. They want to make that pesky Nicholas disappear. But, wait, sometimes they like Nicholas. Sometimes Nicholas is silly and fun to have around. He smells nice after his bath and they like to be hugged by him. They don't really want him to disappear. Maybe, just maybe, they are sorry. Maybe. 2001, Hyperion, $14.99. Ages 3 to 5. Reviewer: Carolyn Mott Ford
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
PreS-K-Goldie expresses anger with flailing arms, flaring eyes, and a constricted or screaming mouth. She is angry because her baby brother has sucked the hair of Veronica, her junior fashion doll. When the preschooler states, "I hate Nicholas," she and Veronica get a time-out "to think and be sorry." Initially, "we don't think we are sorry. We think we still hate Nicholas!" Goldie imagines the baby disappearing, then regrets the loss of his post-bathtime smell and hugs. Just after she and Veronica make a contrite apology to an unseen, unheard authority figure, Nicholas uses the doll's arm as a chew toy, leaving the child to wonder once again how she feels about her younger sibling. Goldie's simply stated monologue conveys her conflict with her brother and the range of resulting feelings. As in Good as Goldie, Palatini uses ink-pen and watercolor cartoon drawings in bold, primary colors to portray her protagonist's emotions. When Goldie is angry, her image fills most of a page; when her feelings soften, her image shrinks in size. The book will work for storytimes and laptimes, to help children identify feelings, come to terms with a younger sibling, or identify the complexities of any relationship.-Laura Scott, Baldwin Public Library, Birmingham, MI Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
A time-out gives an irate tot a chance to ponder the finer aspects of sibling relationships. When her little brother generously soaks her favorite doll with drool, Goldie has a towering tantrum that results in a visit to the time-out chair. At first, Goldie is defiantly unrepentant, vehemently wishing that Nicholas would go away. However, this thought, once vocalized, causes her to stop and consider a life without her baby brother. Suddenly, she discovers a host of endearing qualities about him: gleeful bouts of silliness, delicious just-been-washed baby smells, and exuberant hugs. Palatini (Good as Goldie) skillfully takes the reader through the gamut of emotions associated with a tantrum, successfully clueing readers (and perhaps even their caregivers) in to the purpose of a time-out chair. Text and artwork are deftly integrated to convey the shifting tenor of the tale. Goldie's angry words and emotions are done in oversized fonts and livid red, aptly conveying the fierceness of her feelings. Comical illustrations, depicting Goldie in high dudgeon are uproariously funny. Generously colored and situated on a plain white background, the simplicity of the drawings keep the attention on Goldie's feelings. Although highly idealized-if only all toddler tantrums ran such a smooth course-Goldie's tale of woe and redemption is perfect for young readers learning how to manage their own roiling emotions. (Picture book. 2-5)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780786805655
Publisher:
Hyperion
Publication date:
08/01/2001
Edition description:
1 ED
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.50(w) x 8.50(h) x (d)
Age Range:
1 - 5 Years

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Goldie Is Mad 1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
MJsStokedMom More than 1 year ago
I originally purchased this book to help my child deal with her emotions. I would never imagine a childrens' book to teach hate -- especially about a baby sibling. Goldie says, "I hate baby spit. I hate Nicholas!" I understand the point that this book is trying to get across, but can a 3-year-old?