Goldie Locks Has Chicken Pox

Goldie Locks Has Chicken Pox

5.0 1
by Erin Dealey, Hanako Wakiyama
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Goldie Locks has chicken pox;
from head to toe were polka dots....

When Goldie Locks spies her first spot, her mother knows it must be chicken pox. She immediately calls the Three Bears, apologizing for the chair, to see if Baby Bear has chicken pox, too. Soon, a steady stream of storybook favorites — from Little Bo Peep to Henny Penny —

Overview

Goldie Locks has chicken pox;
from head to toe were polka dots....

When Goldie Locks spies her first spot, her mother knows it must be chicken pox. She immediately calls the Three Bears, apologizing for the chair, to see if Baby Bear has chicken pox, too. Soon, a steady stream of storybook favorites — from Little Bo Peep to Henny Penny — stop by to visit the bedridden child. All the while, Goldie Locks tries to ignore her brother's relentless teasing about her spotted exterior. But as more visitors arrive, her pox-free brother, in a fit of jealousy at the attention his sister is getting, intensifies his teasing, until suddenly all eyes are on him, but not for the reason he thinks...

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
According to PW, "This fond look at old-fashioned fairy tales and family-sitcom dynamics injects wry touches that let readers in on the joke." Ages 3-7. (Apr.) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1-Goldie Locks not only has lots of pink spots, but she also has a thoroughly pesky brother and many visitors, including Henny Penny, Bo Peep, and Jack Be Nimble. While her mouse doctor prescribes cool treats, cool baths, and patience, Little Brother suggests connecting the "dots," calls her a monster and an alien, and boldly boasts of his own immunity, causing poor Goldie to wail, "-how am I supposed to rest/when my brother's such a pest?" However, the obstreperous sibling suffers a fitting (if predictable) fate-some polka dots of his own. The oil illustrations have a decidedly retro feel with furniture, fashions, and fabric patterns of the 1950s. Observant viewers will have fun with the visual references to fairy-tale events. With four to eight lines of verse per page, the rhyming text sometimes strains-"pox" is variously paired with "spots," "squawked," "doc," etc. However, the pacing is lively and both mother and doctor offer sympathy and recommend tried-and-true remedies for this common childhood ailment. This combination of fairy-tale fantasy and domestic realism just might win a smile from young patients and from those adults who can appreciate the nostalgia.-Carol Ann Wilson, Westfield Memorial Library, NJ Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Goldie Locks has contracted chicken pox from an unknown source, although her mom asks Mrs. Bear if Baby Bear shows any signs of the disease. While she's at it, she also apologizes for the chair her daughter broke. Goldie's spots start out small in number and size, but are soon larger and more numerous. And of course they itch like mad. Henny Penny, Bo Peep, and Little Red Riding Hood all make appearances to distract Goldie. The doctor gives a clear-cut diagnosis and suggests a cool bath and lots of sweet treats, but he's a mouse so one might doubt his advice. Little Brother is even more bothersome than the spots and itch. Jealous of all the attention she's receiving, he tries to connect the dots on Goldie's face, makes fun of the way she looks, and is generally obnoxious. Of course, his turn comes too. Dealey has chosen to tell the story in verse, but the verse is amateurish, with too many awkward lines, at least one passage that is completely lacking rhythm and stocked with bland rhymes and several non-rhymes, like "dots/pox" and "six/itched." Straightforward, breezy prose might have served this slight tale better. Wakiyama's (Too Big, 1998, etc.) illustrations are much more successful. They are rendered brightly, in oil, with red the predominating color. The style might be described as 1950s kitsch. Little Brother looks particularly like the icon for an early fast-food chain. There are cowboy shirts, Formica tables, checkered-tile floors, record players, kidney-shaped coffee tables, and more. Great fun to look at, but the illustrations can't save the mediocre writing. (Picture book. 4-7)
From the Publisher
"Great fun to look at."
Kirkus Reviews

"This fond look at old-fashioned fairy tales and family-sitcom dynamics injects wry touches that let readers in on the joke."
Publishers Weekly

"This combination of fairy-tale fantasy and domestic realism just might win a smile from young patients and from those adults who can appreciate the nostalgia."
School Library Journal

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780689829819
Publisher:
Atheneum Books for Young Readers
Publication date:
02/01/2002
Edition description:
1ST
Pages:
40
Sales rank:
1,098,499
Product dimensions:
8.90(w) x 11.20(h) x 0.40(d)
Lexile:
AD420L (what's this?)
Age Range:
3 - 6 Years

Meet the Author

Erin Dealey was inspired to write this story after her daughter's particularly itchy bout with chicken pox. She is an English and drama teacher who lives in Placerville, California, with her husband and her no-longer itchy daughter. Goldie Locks Has Chicken Pox is her first picture book.

Hanako Wakiyama has also suffered through the itchy torment of chicken pox. She is the illustrator of Too Big!, by Claire Masurel, and lives in San Francisco with her husband and young daughter.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Goldie Locks Has Chicken Pox 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I picked this book up for my six year old. The rhyming text was fun for us both. The artwork is absolutely beautiful, with a '50's' feel to it and the introduction of many storybook characters is very imaginative. I highly recommend for 'cuddle-time'.