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Goldilocks and the Three Bears
     

Goldilocks and the Three Bears

by Jim Aylesworth, Barbara McClintock
 

"Once upon a time, there lived a little girl named Goldilocks, who was very, very good, except that sometimes she forgot to do things that her mother told her to do. Yes she did... "
But worse is when she forget's not to do what she is told not to do. For sometimes that can lead to much more serious trouble....like what happened the day of this story.

Overview


"Once upon a time, there lived a little girl named Goldilocks, who was very, very good, except that sometimes she forgot to do things that her mother told her to do. Yes she did... "
But worse is when she forget's not to do what she is told not to do. For sometimes that can lead to much more serious trouble....like what happened the day of this story. McClintock's art, that is reminscent of 19th Century children's book art, perfectly compliments Aylesworth's playful, original, and very involving rendition of the classic Three Bears story.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

* "Aylesworth turns the traditional, all-in-fun nursery tale into a coy lesson -- save for the pictures -- in doing as mother says. McClintock is ideally suited, of course, to illustrating the core of the story: her characterization of the Three Bears is on a par with the animal portrayals of Wallace Tripp, for one distinguished example, and her dramatic, humorous staging of familiar scenes gives new life to the Goldilocks/Three Bears face-off. Would that that were, indeed, the whole story." -- The Horn Book, starred review
* "Another excellent rendition of a favorite folktale....At once antique and immediate, this Goldilocks will sassily invite herself onto library shelves everywhere." -- School Library Journal, starred
* "A conversational voice, delightfully fussy pictures and a recipe for 'Mama Bear's Porridge Cookies' make for a satisfying nursery story." -- Publishers Weekly, starred reviews

"...traditional but never dull retelling of a classic...A conversational voice, delightfully fussy pictures...make for a satisfying nursery story" -Publishers Weekly

""At once antique and immediate, this Goldilocks will sassily invite herself onto library shelves everywhere."" -School Library Journal

Publishers Weekly
The team behind The Gingerbread Man sinks their teeth into this traditional but never dull retelling of a classic. McClintock borrows from Tenniel and Caldecott in her intricate ink-and-watercolor illustrations. Goldilocks may have the thick blonde curls and voluminous rose-pink dress of a doll, but her untied shoelaces, fierce eyes and predatory smile suggest a certain willfulness. Aylesworth likewise sums up the young troublemaker, explaining that Goldilocks "was very, very good, except that sometimes she forgot to do things that her mother told her to do. Yes she did." One day, the girl politely asks permission to pick some flowers, then promptly skips into the forbidden woods. She arrives at the back door of a quaint, ivy-covered stone house just as the Three Bears, dressed for a country stroll, are sauntering out the front. As the girl explores the cottage, her expressions range from absolute disgust to pure joy. When she sinks into the deep cushions of the "medium-sized mama-bear chair" or crawls on the "great, huge papa-bear bed," she frowns like a guest at the Mad Hatter's Tea Party. But as she devours Baby Bear's porridge and flops into his "just right" bed, she relaxes with a contented grin. The poor bears, styled as an unsuspecting middle-class family, are shocked to discover the break-in and the guilty party. A conversational voice, delightfully fussy pictures and a recipe for "Mama Bear's Porridge Cookies" make for a satisfying nursery story. Ages 2-6. (Sept.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
This lively retelling of the familiar story includes a Goldilocks "who was very, very good, except that sometimes she forgot to do things that her mother told her to do. Yes she did!" And she unfortunately "would forget not to do things that her mother told her not to do...."That and her curiosity get her into trouble in the house in the woods which the three bears have left for a walk. The bears' traditional comments when they return are printed in large, medium, and small type to match their sizes. After the frightened Goldilocks runs away, her memory improves so she "never, ever forgot not to do what her mother told her not to do ever, ever again." McClintock imagines the story set in Victorian times with Goldilocks in pink dress, hair ribbon, and frilly apron. Her colored line drawings "rendered in watercolor, sepia ink, and gouache" have that antique look creating an appropriate quaintness to the ivy-covered bears' house, the furniture and clothing, and even the characters' behavior. This version offers a fine storyteller along with the engaging visual narrative. Background notes tell the history of the story, while there is a recipe for Mama Bear's Porridge Cookies on the back of the jacket/cover. For an interesting contrast, compare this with the recent country-style Goldilocks and the Three Bears told by Pam Tillis and illustrated by Jane Chambless Wright (Dutton, 2003). 2003, Scholastic Press, Ages 4 to 8.
— Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2-When a curious little girl forgets to follow her mother's instructions, she finds herself in an unbearable situation. Delightfully rhythmic language and witty artwork make this cozy tale just right. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Though not straying as far from standard versions as Diane Stanley’s Goldie and the Three Bears (p. 1024), this new rendition gives the classic tale a fresh shot of charm. Sounding like a rather maternal storyteller--"Straight away, she saw those porridge bowls on the kitchen table. And mmm, yes! That porridge smelled so delicious that I’m afraid she forgot that her mother had told her not to touch other people’s food . . ."--Aylesworth sends the good-but-impulsive Goldilocks through the back door of a "curious little house" as its ursine residents stroll out the front. Later, when they wake her from her nap, she remembers her mother’s admonition never to talk to strangers, dashes away, and "never ever forgot not to do what her mother told her not to do ever, ever, ever again." Featuring a pretty, pinafore-clad child whose mobile features express exaggerated looks of disgust or delight, McClintock’s finely detailed illustrations have a 19th-century feel, classic but not stiffly formal. A witty alternative to Paul Galdone’s primal version (1972). (source note). (Picture book/folk tale. 7-9)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780439395458
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
09/01/2003
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
553,233
Product dimensions:
8.50(w) x 11.00(h) x (d)
Lexile:
AD830L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author


Jim Aylesworth tells his stories with generous doses of "out loud" sounds, rhythms, and rhymes. His 25-year teaching career taught him exactly what children love best in a story. He lives in Chicago, IL with his wife.

Barbara McClintock has written and/or illustrated over forty distinguished books for children, including My Grandfather's Coat, retold by Jim Aylesworth, which received three starred reviews, and her own highly acclaimed Adele and Simon books. Her books have five times been named New York Times Best Illustrated Children’s Books. She has received a Boston Globe-Horn Book Honor, as well as a myriad of other awards and honors. Barbara lives in Connecticut with her family and two very graceful cats.

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