Goldilocks
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Goldilocks

5.0 1
by Ruth Sanderson
     
 

Beloved illustrator Ruth Sanderson offers a fresh, heartwarming twist to the classic story. In the new happy ending, Goldilocks makes up for her presumptuous infractions on the Three Bears' household by helping them make muffins with the berries she's picked from the woods near their home. Charming artwork—topped off with a tried-and-true recipe for homemade

Overview

Beloved illustrator Ruth Sanderson offers a fresh, heartwarming twist to the classic story. In the new happy ending, Goldilocks makes up for her presumptuous infractions on the Three Bears' household by helping them make muffins with the berries she's picked from the woods near their home. Charming artwork—topped off with a tried-and-true recipe for homemade blueberry muffins—make this new edition of Goldilocks a story time treasure that is just right.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
Sanderson retells the familiar story of Goldilocks simply and with verve, adding an appealingly different ending. Her Goldilocks has been blueberry picking when she comes upon the bears' cottage, which they have left to take a walk. Forgetting her manners, she goes right in. She has the traditional experiences with the three bowls of porridge and the three chairs. Feeling tired, she tries the three beds and falls asleep in the one that is "just right." Upon their return, the bears are distressed to find their door open and a mess in the room. When they discover Goldilocks, however, Baby Bear wants to keep her. Momma Bear suggests that Goldilocks make the beds. She then helps Mama Bear weave a new seat for Baby Bear's chair. When the bears announce that they are hungry, Goldilocks offers her blueberries. All delight as they make blueberry muffins. From her gold-enhanced portrait on the jacket and its miniature on the cover, our curious miss seems almost too pretty, with seductive blue eyes and masses of blond curls. Her peasant outfit adds to the glamour. No wonder Baby Bear wants to keep her! Sanderson uses graphite pencil and Old Holland oil paints for lush, naturalistic double-page paintings filled with details of furniture, dishes, architecture, and more. Mixing a human with bears in peasant costumes works for this fairy tale. A blueberry muffin recipe is included. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2—Sanderson's retelling begins in a familiar vein: Goldilocks is out in the woods (here, picking blueberries), where she encounters an empty house that she can't resist exploring. After tasting the porridge, rocking in the chairs, and trying out the beds, she falls fast asleep. With the entrance of the bears, the tale veers onto a different track. A no-nonsense Mama Bear quickly has Goldilocks straightening the messed bed and helping to repair the broken chair. But when it comes to the empty bowls, Goldilocks, her basket in hand, becomes the one in charge: "Blueberries are very good for breakfast," she suggests. Mama Bear happily agrees and brings out the rest of the ingredients; together they all enjoy muffins right from the oven. The artist warms her version of this oft-told tale with lavish accoutrements, costumes, and furniture that suggest a Scandinavian setting, which will entice viewers to explore the far corners of the pages. Characters are presented up close: the furry-faced bears have stern yet friendly countenances while Goldilocks has just the right mixture of sauciness, curiosity, and kindness to give credibility. The large, richly colored images make this an ideal classroom read-aloud, and Mama Bear's recipe for blueberry muffins offers a nice finishing touch.—Barbara Elleman, Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art, Amherst, MA
Kirkus Reviews
It's a golden year when two equally artistically rendered versions of this classic story are published. This Goldilocks loves to pick blueberries and one morning finds herself in front of a strange cottage. When no one answers she walks in, eats all the porridge, sits in the chairs and climbs into bed where the three bears find her. Instead of running away, though, Mama Bear has Goldilocks make the beds and weave new chair seats. Instead of making more porridge, Goldilocks offers her basket of blueberries for Mama Bear to make muffins (the recipe is included). Contrasting this against Gennady Spirin's Goldilocks and the Three Bears (2009), both are realistically detailed. Spirin's bears are elegantly dressed in Renaissance finery, set against white backgrounds with ornate decorations; Sanderson's pencil-and-oils paintings are more folksy, with characters in Tyrolean garb, rustic furniture and fully furnished backgrounds, pussy willows in a jug and pinecone-decorated china. The good news is there's no need to choose; buy both and feature them on holiday gift lists. (Picture book/folktale. 4-7)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780316778855
Publisher:
Little, Brown Books for Young Readers
Publication date:
10/01/2009
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.70(w) x 11.00(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
4 - 7 Years

Meet the Author

Ruth Sanderson is the author and illustrator of numerous fairy tales for readers of all ages including Mother Goose and Friends, Cinderella, The Night Before Christmas, and The Twelve Dancing Princesses. She lives with her family in Easthampton, Massachusetts.

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Goldilocks 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
An interesting twist on a classic tale. Goldilocks must make reparations for her mistakes and learns a lesson in the process. Great for relating the fact to children that they are responsible for their actions.