Good Enough to Eat

Overview

Once there was a poor girl who had no mama and no papa and nothing at all, not even a name.
 
But then one day an Ogre comes knocking at the town’s gate, threatening to ravage the town unless the townspeople give him one of their fair maidens. Of course they pick this poor girl to be sacrificed. They dress her in a gown and a paper crown, put her in a sack, and leave her for the Ogre. But this brave and clever girl manages to outwit the ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (16) from $1.99   
  • New (1) from $4.05   
  • Used (15) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$4.05
Seller since 2010

Feedback rating:

(398)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
2007-09-18 Hardcover New New, unread book with light shelf wear. May have a remainder mark.

Ships from: Amherst, NY

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview

Once there was a poor girl who had no mama and no papa and nothing at all, not even a name.
 
But then one day an Ogre comes knocking at the town’s gate, threatening to ravage the town unless the townspeople give him one of their fair maidens. Of course they pick this poor girl to be sacrificed. They dress her in a gown and a paper crown, put her in a sack, and leave her for the Ogre. But this brave and clever girl manages to outwit the Ogre and all the townspeople, too, earning a purse full of gold, a fine sharp sword, and most important, a fitting name for herself: Good-Enough-to-Eat.
 
This satisfying story has the feel of a classic fairy tale, brought to life by Brock Cole’s expressive watercolors.
 

Good Enough To Eat is a 2008 Bank Street - Best Children's Book of the Year.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Cole is a master at conveying the emotions of the characters, both animal and human. This engaging story and its resourceful heroine will appeal to many children."—Starred, School Library Journal

"A beguiling mix of rhythmic prose and snatches of verse . . . Fine fare for reading alone or aloud."—Starred, Kirkus Reviews

"Satisfying fare indeed."--The Horn Book

"A spunky and self-contained folkloric heroine whose victory has nothing to do with getting the prince, our protagonist will be welcomed by many young listeners."—Bulletin for the Center for Children's Books

"In both text and art, Cole...delivers an original fairy tale with lingering emotional resonance."Starred, Publisher's Weekly

Publishers Weekly

As in Larky Mavis, Cole introduces an eccentric village misfit who emerges a heroine. The bedraggled lass lives on the streets, selling "stale buns and paper birds," begging for food ("Sometimes she would starve") and singing aloud, much to the displeasure of the villagers who alternately dub her Scraps-and-Smells, Skin-and-Bones or Sweets-and-Treats. The mayor, an impotently compassionate patriarch adorned in purple finery, won't let them run her out of town, claiming, "The poor are always with us, and no good deed goes unrewarded." When a foul ogre threatens to ravage the village if he isn't given a maiden to wed, the residents gladly offer up the gawky young woman, whom they truss up in an ill-fitting gown and battered paper crown. The creature rejects her on sight, but she slyly persuades the townsfolk that the ogre wants both a dowry and a sharp sword. After the ogre swallows maiden, gold and jewels, and sword, the heroine slays the creature and outwits the villagers to strike off on her own, fully equipped with treasure. Cole speeds the action with his bustling ink-and-watercolor washes of the villagers, none of them who seems to pause, neither the well-dressed man who claps his hand over his purse when asked for help nor the plump lady with the disapproving expressions. In both text and art, Cole indicts the hypocritical villagers and delivers an original fairy tale with lingering emotional resonance. Ages 5-up. (Oct.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Children's Literature - Monserrat Urena
A nameless girl is homeless and alone in a small town. The villagers call her many names. To some she is "Scraps-and-Smells" and to others she is "Skin-and-Bones." They view her as a nuisance. One day, a hideous Ogre threatens the small town. He demands that they give him a fair maiden. The townspeople quickly turn to their homeless outcast. They dress her up in a pretty gown, put a paper crown on her head, and send her to the Ogre. But "Scraps-and-Smells" is clever and manages to outsmart everyone. This story uniquely reinvents the idea of the fairy tale heroine. This heroine, like others before her, suffers, but unlike most fairy tale maidens, she does not have any outside help. What she achieves, she achieves on her own. She uses a cunning intelligence to play off the weaknesses of both Ogre and townspeople. This heroine embodies the idea of capturing a seemingly bad turn of luck and turning it into the opportunity of a lifetime. The illustrations are both beautiful and painful. The heroine's unfortunate condition comes through palpably through the early illustrations. The Ogre is comedic and perfectly disgusting. This a story for the reader who is looking for something outside the conventions of the weak and insipid maiden in distress. This is recommended for its edgy turn and its interesting conclusion.
School Library Journal

K-Gr 3
A poor homeless girl, known only as "Scraps-and-Smells" or "Skin-and-Bones" or "Sweets-and-Treats," is barely tolerated by the townspeople. When a terrifying Ogre comes to the town gate demanding a bride, the frightened villagers quickly choose her as their offering. But this girl is not as dimwitted as she might seem, and she cleverly manages to get the best of both the foul Ogre and the ungrateful townspeople. The writing is vivid, incorporating some rhyming verse and some delicious vocabulary, making the story especially well suited for reading aloud. The descriptions are sometimes harsh and compelling: " . . . sometimes she would beg and sometimes she would starve . . . ." Strong ink outlines add energy to the watercolor illustrations, aptly conveying the events of the dramatic text. Cole is a master at depicting the emotions of the characters, both animal and human. This engaging story and its resourceful heroine will appeal to many children.
—Robin L. GibsonCopyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Kirkus Reviews
Like Larky Mavis (2001) but sans the metaphysics, this folklorish original tale gives a poor, scorned orphan a chance to show her inner stuff, and to make a fresh start. When an ogre-"Oh, he was a foul creature! His breath smelled of graves, and he had rats in his hair instead of lice"-appears at the town gates demanding a bride, the townsfolk dress the nameless beggar, sometimes dubbed "Scraps-and-Smells" or "Skin-and-Bones," in a fine gown and a paper crown, and push her out. She turns out to be quicker of wit than anyone supposes, however, and by the time the ogre finally swallows her down, she's acquired a sharp sword and a purse of gold-using the one to kill the monster and triumphantly carrying the other away as her reward, head held high. Cole writes in a beguiling mix of rhythmic prose and snatches of verse, paired to equally beguiling watercolor scenes of rumpled-looking figures in a medieval setting. Viewers who linger over the pictures will be rewarded with plenty of comical side details, but also come to appreciate the artist's genius for conveying character through subtleties of posture and expression. Fine fare for reading alone or aloud. (Picture book. 7-9)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780374327378
  • Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
  • Publication date: 9/18/2007
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Pages: 32
  • Age range: 6 - 10 Years
  • Lexile: AD810L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 8.91 (w) x 10.61 (h) x 0.39 (d)

Meet the Author

BROCK COLE is the author and/or illustrator of many books. His picture books include Buttons, a Boston Globe-Horn Book Award Honor Book, and Larky Mavis, and his critically acclaimed novels include The Goats and Celine. Most recently, he illustrated George Washington's Teeth, written by Deborah Chandra and Madeleine Comora, which was selected as an ALA Notable Book. He lives in Buffalo, New York.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)