A Good Life: Newspapering and Other Adventures

A Good Life: Newspapering and Other Adventures

5.0 1
by Ben Bradlee
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

This is the witty, candid story of a daring young man who made his own way to the heights of American journalism and public life, of the great adventure that took him at only twenty years old straight from Harvard to almost four years in the shooting war in the South Pacific, and back, from a maverick New Hampshire weekly to an apprenticeship for Newsweek in postwar… See more details below

Overview

This is the witty, candid story of a daring young man who made his own way to the heights of American journalism and public life, of the great adventure that took him at only twenty years old straight from Harvard to almost four years in the shooting war in the South Pacific, and back, from a maverick New Hampshire weekly to an apprenticeship for Newsweek in postwar Paris, then to the Washington Bureau chief’s desk, and finally to the apex of his career at The Washington Post.

Bradlee took the helm of The Washington Post in 1965. He and his reporters transformed it into one of the most influential and respected news publications in the world, reinvented modern investigative journalism, and redefined the way news is reported, published, and read. Under his direction, the paper won eighteen Pulitzer Prizes. His leadership and investigative drive following the break-in at the Democratic National Committee led to the downfall of a president, and kept every president afterward on his toes. Bradlee, backed every step of the way by the Graham family, challenged the federal government over the right to publish the Pentagon Papers—and won. His ingenuity, and the spirited reporting of Sally Quinn, now his wife, led to the creation of the Style Section, a revolutionary newspaper feature in its time, now copied by just about every paper in the country.

Read More

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Having spent 25 years as Executive Editor of the Washington Post, Bradlee's memoir looks at such memorable incidents as Watergate and the Pentagon Papers. (Sept.)
Library Journal
Bradlee, immortalized in the Watergate film All the President's Men, retired in 1991 after 26 years as executive editor of the Washington Post. This memoir, bluntly written and sprinkled with salty language, tells his life story, which included a close friendship with John and Jackie Kennedy. As colorful as Bradlee's personal life has been, the most interesting stories here are journalistic: Watergate with Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, publication of the Vietnam-era Pentagon Papers, and the saga of Janet Cooke, a young Post reporter who had to return a 1981 Pulitzer Prize when it was discovered that her story of an eight-year-old heroin addict had been fabricated. For more of Bradlee and the Post, seek out In the Shadow of Power: The Story of the Washington Post, by veteran Post reporter Chalmers M. Roberts (Seven Locks Pr., 1989). Recommended for most collections. [Previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 5/15/95.]Bruce Rosenstein, "USA Today" Lib., Arlington, Va.
Mary Carroll
Bradlee may not be the "most important, glamorous, and famous newspaperman of modern times," as his publisher claims, but the "Washington Post"'s longtime (196591) executive editor knows how to write an autobiography. It's all here: growing up in a shabby, genteel branch of an upper-crust Boston family; prep school and Harvard; four years on Navy destroyers in the Pacific; apprenticeship as a reporter in New Hampshire and Washington; "Newsweek" years in Paris and then Washington in the 1950s and 1960s; the move into editorial management at the "Post"; JFK, the Pentagon Papers, Watergate, and the Janet Cooke fiasco; three wives, children, stepchildren, and life after retirement. Bradlee deserves credit (with owner Katherine Graham and others) for making the "Post" one of the nation's best newspapers, and his memoirs include thoughtful ruminations on subjects like the celebrity status and establishment power that journalism's stars have achieved during his 45-year watch. What Bradlee seems not to recognize even now is how much the "luck" that contributed to his "good life" reflected class advantages: arrogance and a sense of entitlement sometimes lie below the surface here. Still, Bradlee's genuine accomplishments and his bird's-eye view of history--plus a 100,000-copy first printing, "Newsweek" serialization, and alternate selection status with the Book-of-the-Month Club--suggest that "A Good Life" is headed for the best-seller lists.

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781439128855
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster
Publication date:
05/31/2011
Sold by:
SIMON & SCHUSTER
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
512
Sales rank:
391,213
File size:
7 MB

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >