The Good Luck Cat

The Good Luck Cat

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by Joy Harjo
     
 


Some cats are good luck. You pet them and good things happen. Woogie is one of those cats. But as Woogie gets into one mishap after another, everyone starts to worry. Can a good luck cat's good luck run out?

The first children's book from an acclaimed poet whose honors include the American Book Award and the William Carlos Williams Award

Celebrates the special

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Overview


Some cats are good luck. You pet them and good things happen. Woogie is one of those cats. But as Woogie gets into one mishap after another, everyone starts to worry. Can a good luck cat's good luck run out?

The first children's book from an acclaimed poet whose honors include the American Book Award and the William Carlos Williams Award

Celebrates the special relationship between a young girl and her cat •A modern Native American story from a member of the Muskogee-Creek tribe

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Native American poet and literary critic Harjo makes her children's book debut with a simple but beautifully executed tale of a "good luck cat": "You pet [her] and good things happen." Woogie, the cat in question, has need of some luck--as the unnamed girl who narrates explains, Woogie has quickly used up eight of her nine lives, surviving an encounter with a large dog, a tumble in the clothes dryer, a fall from a tree, etc. Then, apparently down to her last life, Woogie disappears. The girl searches everywhere and finally puts a dish of food and some cat toys on the stoop, asking her cat to return. The next morning, Woogie has reappeared, missing half an ear but seemingly content. Harjo combines a childlike voice with a command of detail and imagery ("When I pet her she purrs as if she has a drum near her heart"), and the passing characterization of the narrator as Native American adds interest. Lee's (Amistad Rising) spare, sharply focused, acrylic art provides realistic action views of the risk-taking Woogie, showing familiarity with the way cats move. Given its fresh narrative voice and winning animal heroine, this is likely to have a long shelf life--perhaps even nine. Ages 3-7. (Apr.) Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.|
Children's Literature - Children's Literature
Woogie is a special cat. She has nine lives, just like all cats, but she also has the gift of bringing good luck to her family. At the rate that she is using up her nine lives, however, the question arises as to whether her luck has finally run out. Being a cat owner myself, I can empathize with Woogie's owners when she disappears. This is the part that is particularly scary. Will she return? Has something happen to her? I've been through it myself. The author has created an exciting story and paints a realistic picture of the typical adventures of a feisty cat. 2000, Harcourt, Ages 5 to 8, $16.00. Reviewer: Leila Toledo
Alan Tack
While young readers will surely find the tale exciting and will identify with the narrator's feelings, they will also find in the story lessons in good stewardship, respect for the wisdom of the elders and reverence for life around us—lessons deftly cast in a contemporary Native context.
Native Peoples
Kirkus Reviews
Poet Harjo's first children's book is a high-drama tale of a cat with more than nine lives. The narrator, an adolescent Native American girl, has a cat named Woogie. Woogie is all soft fur and electric-green eyes, and she confers a bit of good luck on all those who give her a stroking. She is also capable of her share of mischief and accidents and close calls, eight of which the narrator tells in the story, each caught in the direst moment by Lee in expressive, highly polished illustrations that project the burnished colors of late autumn. The incidents are both comical and slightly scary: Woogie falls asleep under the hood of the car by the warm engine and then is rudely awakened, or falls out of a tree and lands on her head rather than her feet, or gets chased by her cousin's dog. But eight lives are now spent and when Woogie goes missing, the girl is badly worried. Woogie does return, minus half an ear, so she must be a good luck cat indeed to have returned at all. Anyone who has loved a cat will find plenty to identify with here, and those who haven't had the pleasure will get a sense of what they are missing in terms of affection and missed heartbeats. (Picture book. 4-6)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780152321970
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
04/28/2000
Edition description:
1 ED
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
11.36(w) x 8.80(h) x 0.34(d)
Lexile:
AD540L (what's this?)
Age Range:
3 - 7 Years

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Good Luck Cat 1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is one of the worst books I have ever read to my 4 year old. It is all about how a cat "loses" her lives--from being thrown into a dryer, to dogs chasing her, to being locked in a box and forgotten about, to being chased and shot at by boys with bb guns. I can't imagine why anyone would want to read this to their child--it teaches them about violence towards cats is ok because they will survive it....Sad.