Good Mentoring: Fostering Excellent Practice in Higher Education

Overview

For a society to endure, it is necessary to preserve the knowledge, beliefs, and ways of living that give shape to the identity of a group—what anthropologists call culture. One of the oldest and most effective ways to keep what has been learned from being forgotten is through face-to-face interaction between older and younger members of a community.

Good Mentoring offers a detailed analysis of the way mentors transmit not only knowledge and skills, but guiding values that ...

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Overview

For a society to endure, it is necessary to preserve the knowledge, beliefs, and ways of living that give shape to the identity of a group—what anthropologists call culture. One of the oldest and most effective ways to keep what has been learned from being forgotten is through face-to-face interaction between older and younger members of a community.

Good Mentoring offers a detailed analysis of the way mentors transmit not only knowledge and skills, but guiding values that support good work—work that is excellent in quality, socially responsible, and meaningful to its practitioners. In doing so, mentors foster the professional integrity that benefits society as a whole, as well as the practitioners themselves and the fields in which they work. Drawing on a first-of-its-kind study by the GoodWork Project—a cooperative enterprise by Harvard, Stanford, and Claremont Graduate University—the authors show how the cultivation of professional ethics and excellence depends on teachers and mentors and the learning environments they foster. In profiles of three lineages of scientists who passed their professional skills, values, and practices down through generations, the book reveals what constitutes successful mentoring in science and beyond.

The authors identify six key dimensions of supportive mentoring:

  • A balance between intellectual freedom and guidance
  • Consistent availability and involvement
  • An atmosphere and resources for fostering development
  • Positive feedback that is specific and encouraging
  • Treatment of graduate students as respected collaborators
  • Individualized attention to the student

Good Mentoring includes practical advice to mentors, mentees, and institutions where graduate and professional education occurs, and suggestions for future directions for researchers.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“Having a mentor can be a great experience or it can be disappointing. As advisors, we know why it is important that students have a great mentoring experience, but often how to cultivate a great experience is not addressed. Jeanne Nakamura and David Shernoff, in their new book Good Mentoring, strive to define good mentoring and offer details on how it can be achieved.

To reach this goal, the authors conducted a research study to determine the practices that make mentors effective and what kind of relationships support good mentoring. Though the authors conducted their research in the field of science, the results can be applied to many fields. 

Readers…will find good suggestions for anyone striving to become a good mentor.”

NACADA Journal, Issue 30(1) (Spring 2010)

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780470189634
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 6/2/2009
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 336
  • Product dimensions: 6.30 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.30 (d)

Meet the Author

Jeanne Nakamura is assistant professor in the School of Behavioral and Organizational Sciences and codirector of the Quality of Life Research Center at Claremont Graduate University.

David J. Shernoff is associate professor in the Department of Leadership, Educational Psychology, and Foundations at Northern Illinois University.

Charles H. Hooker, an attorney at Kilpatrick Stockton LLP, conducted research on human development, shared leadership, and group mentoring while working on the GoodWork Project.

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Table of Contents

The Authors.

Foreword.

Preface.

Acknowledgments.

1. Why Mentoring?

Part One: Three Examples of Good Mentoring.

2. The Naturalist.

3. The Physician-Scientist.

4. The Moralist.

Part Two: How Good Mentoring Works.

5. Values, Practices, and Knowledge Through the Generations.

6. How Values, Practices, and Knowledge Are Transmitted.

7. Supportive Relationships as the Context for Intergenerational Influence.

Part Three: Promoting Good Mentoring.

8. What Have We Learned?

9. Where Do We Go from Here?

Appendix A: Data Collection, Coding, and Analyses.

Appendix B: Science Apprenticeship Study—G2 and G3 Interview Questions.

Appendix C: Global Code Sheet.

References.

Index.

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