Good Mousekeeping: And Other Animal Home Poems

Good Mousekeeping: And Other Animal Home Poems

by J. Patrick Lewis, Lisa Desimini
     
 

Where would animals reside
...if they could decide?

A house that suits a polar bear?
Some place with very central air.

Where would a flamingo go?
She'd go to a flamingolow!

A rabbit's digs?
A garden apartment with walls of twigs.

J. Patrick Lewis's delightfully clever verse and Lisa Desimini's bright, imaginative

Overview

Where would animals reside
...if they could decide?

A house that suits a polar bear?
Some place with very central air.

Where would a flamingo go?
She'd go to a flamingolow!

A rabbit's digs?
A garden apartment with walls of twigs.

J. Patrick Lewis's delightfully clever verse and Lisa Desimini's bright, imaginative artwork will spark children's laughter — and their imaginations.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Lewis eschews the conventional approach to books about animal houses and imagines instead what sorts of dwellings different animals would choose if they lived "on a street with all of the/ Creature comforts." The Dragon's home thus "has warmth and charm,/ Four sprinklers and a/ SMOKE ALARM!" and a "house that suits a Polar Bear/ Has very, very central air." Unfortunately, with the exception of the longer title poem, "Good Mousekeeping," these brief verses are less energetic and clever than the poems in Lewis and Desimini's Doodle Dandies. Lines seem padded to create the rhyme, and Lewis's puns and wordplay generally lack the dexterity of his previous work ("A house would make/ A Bullfrog hopping mad/ If it did not come with/ A launching pad"). Desimini's inventive, computer-enhanced mixed-media collages yield the greater wit and humor. A house meant for a porcupine, for example, is shaped like the familiar red tomato pincushion with button eyes and porcupine quill needles. The turtle (who likes "a humble home/ To match his geodesic dome") inhabits a coconut shell which is split in two, half an igloo-shaped house and the other half a milky swimming pool. Humorous details, such as a framed picture of two ears of corn hung above a pig's loveseat, compensate for the inconsistencies of the poems. Ages 4-8. (May) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature
Where would an animal prefer to live? Lewis' short poems describe some fanciful places and artist Desimini lets her imagination run wild in this picture book. The premise is amusing, but the poems and accompanying art are a bit uneven. Kids will probably get a chuckle out of the porcupine's home and cowbird's ranch on a branch, but may scratch their heads over the bookworm and pig's abodes. It is all silly fun, the bright, imaginative art is arresting, and the cover a true delight. The notes state that the art was created by scanning drawings, paintings, fabrics, photographs and other items to fashion the imaginative three-dimensional scenes. 2001, Anne Schwartz/Atheneum, . Ages 4 to 8. Reviewer: Marilyn Courtot
School Library Journal
Gr 2-4-The creative team that collaborated on Doodle Dandies (Atheneum, 1998) is back in Good Mousekeeping. Desimini's computer-scanned collages lift what are occasionally forced rhymes into dazzling visual images. No one is better at clever wordplay than Lewis ("Chameleon's a shadow no one knows/And where he'd live is anybody's guess./He'd camouflage like wallpaper to pose/But never leave a forwarding address") and the book contains enough gems to make it a worthy companion to Mary Ann Hoberman's A House Is a House for Me (Puffin, 1982).-Kathleen Whalin, York Public Library, ME Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Whimsical verse marries curious art in a second collaboration by Lewis and Desimini (Doodle Dandies, 1998). A succession of animals including a flamingo, a dragon, a cowbird, and a pair of hippos suggest their abodes of choice in playful verses replete with puns and internal rhymes. " ‘Here's what to do: Read slowly, chew / Delicious books, all ages,' " / The Bookworm said, " ‘but make your bed / With sheets of picture pages.' " Desimini's collages, constructed by scanning images of all kinds of fabrics, textures, and pictures, will inspire scrutiny to detect their sources. An endnote reveals some secrets (the fact that the dragon's scaly tail and shingled tower are made from Popsicle sticks, for example), while other image sources (coconuts, feathers, and a pincushion for the porcupine's house) are more easily observed. Sly details abound. A cowbird's home is a "Branch/Ranch," complete with miniature black and white cows, while the polar bear's ice house with "central air" contains fish within its frozen walls. Although some of the verses are uninspired ("into" rhyming with "into"), others delight, such as, "Perfectly porpoisely, / Porpoises purposely / Surf through the windows and / Leap through the door." (Picture book/poetry. 6-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780689831614
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster Children's Publishing
Publication date:
05/01/2001
Edition description:
1 ED
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.70(w) x 11.38(h) x 0.35(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >