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Good People
     

Good People

4.6 5
by David Lindsay-Abaire
 

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"A lyrical and understanding chronicler of people who somehow become displaced within their own lives. . . . Mr. Lindsay-Abaire has shown a special affinity for female characters suddenly forced to re-evaluate the roles by which they define themselves."—The New York Times

With his latest play Good People, David Lindsay-Abaire returns to

Overview

"A lyrical and understanding chronicler of people who somehow become displaced within their own lives. . . . Mr. Lindsay-Abaire has shown a special affinity for female characters suddenly forced to re-evaluate the roles by which they define themselves."—The New York Times

With his latest play Good People, David Lindsay-Abaire returns to Manhattan Theatre Club where four of his previous works were produced, including his 2007 Pulitzer Prize-winning Rabbit Hole. The play premiered there in winter 2011 in a production directed by Daniel Sullivan (who also directed Rabbit Hole), and featuring Frances McDormand in the role of protagonist Margie Walsh. Good People is set in South Boston, the blue-collar neighborhood where Lindsay-Abaire himself grew up: Margie Walsh, let go from yet another job and facing eviction, decides to appeal to an old flame who has made good and left his Southie past behind. Lindsay-Abaire offers us both his "quiet three-dimensional depth" (Los Angeles Times) and his carefully observed humor in this exploration of life in America when you're on your last dollar.

David Lindsay-Abaire is the author of Fuddy Meers, Kimberly Akimbo, A Devil Inside, Wonder of the World, and Rabbit Hole, in addition to the book for the musicals High Fidelity and Shrek. His plays have been produced throughout the United States and around the world.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“A lyrical and understanding chronicler of people who somehow become displaced within their own lives. . . . Mr. Lindsay-Abaire has shown a special affinity for female characters suddenly forced to re-evaluate the roles by which they define themselves.”—The New York Times

“Lindsay-Abaire’s complex characters illustrate the difficult choices people will make to achieve their ambitions or retain their own sense of pride, along with the importance of luck in escaping poverty. By the end of the play, the near impossibility of always being ‘good people’ is searingly apparent.” –Jennifer Farrar, Associated Press

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781559366595
Publisher:
Theatre Communications Group
Publication date:
06/21/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
112
Sales rank:
439,632
File size:
236 KB

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From the Publisher

“A lyrical and understanding chronicler of people who somehow become displaced within their own lives. . . . Mr. Lindsay-Abaire has shown a special affinity for female characters suddenly forced to re-evaluate the roles by which they define themselves.”—The New York Times

Meet the Author

DAVID LINDSAY-ABAIRE, a native of South Boston, won the Pulitzer Prize for Rabbit Hole which was recently filmed starring Nicole Kidman. He is the author of several plays including Fuddy Mears and Kimberly Akimbo as well as the book for two musicals High Fidelity and Shrek the Musical. He lives in New York with his wife and two children.

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Good People 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A great example of modern playwriting, and an easy and engaging read. The characters have wonderful and engaging journeys. David Lindsay-Abaire's "Good People" definitely challenges your moral compass and your ideas of social justice and who is owed what.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Recomended
J23 More than 1 year ago
Another wonderful play from David Lindsay-Abaire. Great understanding of people's characters and a very real situation they find themselves in.
RandallDavidCook More than 1 year ago
David Lindsay-Abaire's brilliant new play touches on a topic that most American writers avoid: class differences, and how they affect and touch so many aspects of our lives.