The Good Soldier Svejk: and His Fortunes in the World War

( 5 )

Overview

The inspiration for such works as Joseph Heller's Catch-22, Jaroslav Hašek's black satire The Good Soldier Švejk is translated with an introduction by Cecil Parrott in Penguin Classics. Good-natured and garrulous, Švejk becomes the Austro-Hungarian army's most loyal Czech soldier when he is called up on the outbreak of the First World War - although his bumbling attempts to get to the front serve only to prevent him from reaching it. Playing cards, getting drunk and becoming a general nuisance, the resourceful ...

See more details below
Paperback (Revised)
$14.20
BN.com price
(Save 21%)$18.00 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (46) from $1.99   
  • New (21) from $9.48   
  • Used (25) from $1.99   
Sending request ...

Overview

The inspiration for such works as Joseph Heller's Catch-22, Jaroslav Hašek's black satire The Good Soldier Švejk is translated with an introduction by Cecil Parrott in Penguin Classics. Good-natured and garrulous, Švejk becomes the Austro-Hungarian army's most loyal Czech soldier when he is called up on the outbreak of the First World War - although his bumbling attempts to get to the front serve only to prevent him from reaching it. Playing cards, getting drunk and becoming a general nuisance, the resourceful Švejk uses all his natural cunning and genial subterfuge to deal with the doctors, police, clergy and officers who chivvy him towards battle. The story of a 'little man' caught in a vast bureaucratic machine, The Good Soldier Švejk combines dazzling wordplay and piercing satire to create a hilariously subversive depiction of the futility of war. Cecil Parrott's vibrant, unabridged and unbowdlerized translation is accompanied by an introduction discussing Hašek's turbulent life as an anarchist, communist and vagranty, and the Everyman character of Švejk. This edition also includes a guide to Czech names, maps and original illustrations by Josef Ladas. Jaroslav Hašek (1883-1923) Besides this book, the writer wrote more than 2,000 short works, short stories, glosses, sketches, mostly under various pen-names. If you enjoyed The Good Soldier Švejk, you might like Mikhail Bulgakov's The Master and Margarita, also available in Penguin Classics. 'Brilliant ... perhaps the funniest novel ever written' George Monbiot 'Hašek was a comic genius' Sunday Times 'Hašek was a humorist of the highest calibre....A later age will perhaps put him on a level with Cervantes and Rabelais' Max Brod

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780140449914
  • Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 12/27/2005
  • Edition description: Revised
  • Pages: 784
  • Sales rank: 224,951
  • Product dimensions: 5.03 (w) x 7.79 (h) x 1.35 (d)

Meet the Author

Jaroslav Hašek (1883-1923) Besides this book, the writer wrote more than 2,000 short works, short stories, glosses, sketches, mostly under various pen-names.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 5 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(4)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 28, 2005

    Humble greatness...

    If you like literature - you will love this book. It's as simple as that. The humor is umimitable, the characters are not only vivid and memorable, but also very very real. They are still among us, and you will, in fact, recognize them as you read. The plot is very interesting, but it fades in comparison with the character of Shejk. He is unique, there is noone like him in literature. After reading the book he will become a friend to you, and his presence will never leave you afterwards. He is truly great. And just as a sidenote - this is a must-read for everyone who either wants to learn about Eastern European culture, or will go there anytime soon - that part of the world has not changed much since Shejk walked the earth.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 27, 2004

    Hasek

    Svejk is a haunting fellow, even weeks after `living¿ with him through his haunts in Czech Republic, I still think about his exploits. Many people must remember the American on the train or in the hostel laughing out loud while he read. Svejk clearly is not stupid, he plays the idiot automatically when it benefits him. He knows that the front line will not be good for him, but is loyal to his Lt up to suggesting that he take the punishment for his Lt.¿s hedonistic tendencies. One thing that bothered me is the coincidence of the story about the editor that made up animals for his periodicals. This is eerily similar to Samuel Clemens¿ short story about editing a country journal. The story does get long in parts, rehashing times in the ¿gaol¿ or his ¿guzzling¿ fellow soldiers. I think Heller must¿ve drawn `inspiration¿ from Hasek, so perhaps it¿s simply being passed on¿ The Army has not changed over 100 years and a continent away. Nobody knows what¿s going on and if you have some power¿ The portrayal of war is equivalent to Remarque¿s All Quiet on the Western Front, but seemingly forgotten today. The history of Hasek face to face with this writing was constantly in mind as I read.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 21, 2001

    Svejk Forever

    This is a wonderfully satiric book that I've read 5 times. It pokes fun not only at the martial mentality, but also empires and petty officials and most other people as well. Hasek fits more anecdotal stories into this than any other book I've read. Also, if you enjoy Eastern European culture: food and drink and liquor, you'll love this novel. Svejk would be a wonderful guest any time you're at a pub or a party.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 27, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 6, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)