Good Times

( 1 )

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Ronnie D. Lankford
While categories like alternative country can help identify the kind of music a certain artist plays, they can also be confusing. If a singer like Charlie Robison plays country music but doesn't receive play on mainstream country music stations, does that automatically make him alternative? Or do lyrics like "For your footprint in the sand, did you hear the ocean singin'" make him a singer/songwriter with country backing? Good Times conjures up such questions because Robison isn't a mainstream country singer, but seems like he's playing country music because it's part of who he is and how he thinks, not because a friend loaned him a George Jones album in college. The...
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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Ronnie D. Lankford
While categories like alternative country can help identify the kind of music a certain artist plays, they can also be confusing. If a singer like Charlie Robison plays country music but doesn't receive play on mainstream country music stations, does that automatically make him alternative? Or do lyrics like "For your footprint in the sand, did you hear the ocean singin'" make him a singer/songwriter with country backing? Good Times conjures up such questions because Robison isn't a mainstream country singer, but seems like he's playing country music because it's part of who he is and how he thinks, not because a friend loaned him a George Jones album in college. The title cut is an upbeat ode to having a big time by getting stoned out of one's gourd, the type of song Merle Haggard used to toss off without a thought. "The Bottom," on the other hand, is a sad weeper about the woman who got away, a song that Jones might've sung in his heyday. Then again, Robison's entertaining and raunchy "Love Means Never Having to Say You're Hungry" probably couldn't be played on country radio even if a DJ wanted to. It's times like these when Robison sounds a bit too clever for straight country. His band, however, utilizes acoustic guitars, fiddles, and Dobros, and these arrangements keep the whole affair grounded. Good Times finally qualifies as solid country release that will nonetheless appeal to the alternative crowd.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 9/21/2004
  • Label: Dualtone Music Group
  • UPC: 803020118522
  • Catalog Number: 1185
  • Sales rank: 152,159

Album Credits

Performance Credits
Charlie Robison Primary Artist, Acoustic Guitar, Vocals, Vocal Harmony
Keith Robinson Percussion, Drums
Rich Brotherton Mandolin
Pat Buchanan Guitar
Paul Franklin Steel Guitar
David Grissom Guitar
Tony Harrell Keyboards
Lloyd Maines Dobro, Steel Guitar, Lap Steel Guitar, Papoose
Greg Morrow Percussion, Drums
Riley Osbourne Keyboards
Billy Panda Acoustic Guitar
Bruce Robison Vocals, Vocal Harmony
Ted Roddy Harmonica
Glenn Worf Bass Guitar
Glenn Fukunaga Bass, Double Bass
Chip Dolan Accordion
Scott Esbeck Bass Guitar
Natalie Maines Vocals, Vocal Harmony
Eamon McLoughlin Fiddle
Robyn Ludwick Vocals, Vocal Harmony
Technical Credits
Terry Allen Composer
Blake Chancey Producer, Audio Production
Lloyd Maines Producer, Audio Production
Greg Morrow Producer, Audio Production
Charlie Robison Composer, Producer, Audio Production
Keith Gattis Composer
James Calloway Engineer
Tony Castle Engineer
Waylon Payne Composer
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Robison returns to the indie circuit

    The grand experiment that was Sony's Lucky Dog imprint never really managed to turn the renegades (Bruce & Charlie Robison, Jack Ingram, BR549, The Derailers, among others) into commercial stars, and one-by-one, they're fruitfully returning to their indie roots. To give the label its due, the albums these artists put out under the Lucky Dog imprint, smoothing out rougher edges with mainstream production hands, were artistically interesting, if not commercially successful. ¶ Perhaps none of the Lucky Dog releases benefited more from this combination than Robison's 2000 release, "Step Right Up," with its flagship single, "Right Man for the Job." As a man in transition (recently married, soon-to-be father), the album found Robison advancing his party-boy songwriting to more adult (but not necessarily less rowdy) subjects. This follow-up, waxed for the busy Dualtone label (and recorded in Austin, TX with Lloyd Maines at the board), finds Robison a few more years into his marriage and two years into fatherhood. He's neither as prickly as on his earlier releases, nor as radio-polished as on his last, resting instead in a middle ground of mid-life. ¶ The album isn't filled with autobiographical songs of family life (though the lascivious "Love Means Never Having to Say You're Hungry" and the sentimental "Photograph" certainly count), but Robison does use his new found roles as a path away from the bachelor life touched upon in the title track. As on earlier albums, he's especially successful when writing in the Texas school of Van Zandt and McMurtry with story songs like "New Year's Day" and the waltz-time "Magnolia." ¶ In addition to guest harmonies from brother Bruce and bandmate-in-law Natalie Maines, Robison sings songs from Keith Gattis, Waylon Paine and Terry Allen. The latter's "Flatland Boogie" is particularly fine, managing to evoke both the windswept plains of Texas and the romance of Springsteen's highway sprites. It's a fitting piece to summarize Robison's music - down home at its heart, but with an ear that took in rock radio of the '80s, and feet that still need to wander.

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