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Good to the Grain: Baking with Whole-Grain Flours [NOOK Book]

Overview

Baking with whole-grain flours used to be about making food that was good for you, not food that necessarily tasted good, too. But Kim Boyce truly has reinvented the wheel with this collection of 75 recipes that feature 12 different kinds of whole-grain flours, from amaranth to teff, proving that whole-grain baking is more about incredible flavors and textures than anything else. When Boyce, a former pastry chef at Spago and Campanile, left the kitchen to raise a family, she was determined to create delicious ...
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Good to the Grain: Baking with Whole-Grain Flours

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Overview

Baking with whole-grain flours used to be about making food that was good for you, not food that necessarily tasted good, too. But Kim Boyce truly has reinvented the wheel with this collection of 75 recipes that feature 12 different kinds of whole-grain flours, from amaranth to teff, proving that whole-grain baking is more about incredible flavors and textures than anything else. When Boyce, a former pastry chef at Spago and Campanile, left the kitchen to raise a family, she was determined to create delicious cakes, muffins, breads, tarts, and cookies that her kids (and everybody else) would love. She began experimenting with whole-grain flours, and Good to the Grain is the happy result. The cookbook proves that whole-grain baking can be easily done with a pastry chefAÆs flair. Plus, thereAÆs a chapter on making jams, compotes, and fruit butters with seasonal fruits that help bring out the wonderfully complex flavors of whole-grain flours.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781613121290
  • Publisher: Abrams, Harry N., Inc.
  • Publication date: 11/23/2011
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 208
  • File size: 25 MB
  • Note: This product may take a few minutes to download.

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 6 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(3)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 9, 2011

    Disappointed

    I was disappointed in the amount of AP flour used in many of the recipes. For example, in the Quinoa section, there are cookies that use 2-1/2 cups of AP and only 1/2 cup of Quinoa flour.

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 12, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    'Grain' for the Hungry and Healthy

    Seventy-fives scrumptious recipes fill "Good the Grain: Baking with Whole-Grain Flours," a new book from ex-pastry chef Kim Boyce.

    Biscuits, scones, pancakes, porridges and cakes are among the recipes, using 12 different whole grains. Some are more common than others: rye and buckwheat turn up, but so does amaranth,a pre-Columbian grain that was prohibited by the Spanish conquistadores because of its use in human sacrfice ceremonies.

    Boyce makes sure each recipe is easy to use, writing with clarity and relative brevity. Each is accompanied by colorful, closeup photos of the results. Some are a little unusual: blue cheese and onion scones, barley porridge and kasha pudding, while others, such as apple graham coffee cake, gingerbread cake and maple pecan granola might seem more familiar.

    Included in the book are weight conversion charts, sources for some of the more unusual products, and guide to stocking a pantry with the right tools.

    This is a handsome book filled with good advice, and a great addition to any collection of cookbooks.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 12, 2013

    Blah

    Blahblah

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 25, 2014

    This cookbook sounds like the author really knows the grains she

    This cookbook sounds like the author really knows the grains she is using.  Unfortunately, she does not specify whole or white for spelt or Kamut.  This leaves the baker to try both.  I have baked with many grains and flours other than wheat due to a wheat sensitivity.  So far, the recipes have been less than satisfactory due to the lack of which type of flour (whole or white) to use as well as a through understanding of how the grains work or don't work for a recipe.  What I can recommend is to learn hot to substitute other grains and flours for wheat on your own using your current recipes.  I give this book a two star instead of a 1 star based upon the introduction to the various grains.  This is the best part of the book.  Ms. Boyce, please have regular bakers try out your recipes before you write another cookbook.  A Good Baker I am.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2014

    I bought this book to explore whole grain cookie recipes.  I fou

    I bought this book to explore whole grain cookie recipes.  I found the organization disappointing.  It is by flour type, not by baked good type or any other fun, imaginative structure. The chapter intro material is OK and the jams and compote recipes are a bonus.  I also felt the tools and pantry sections were not need, and would rather have seen more photos of finished products.  That said it is good for exploring ideas that are not too crazy but expand a baking repertoire.  As a result I have a few new cookie ideas on my ‘to-bake’ list: amaranth honey-hazelnut, kamut shortbread, spelt double-chocolate, and cornmeal-blueberry cookies. 

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  • Posted October 18, 2013

    Highly Recommended if you are looking to use whole grains

    Nicely written cookbook of one pastry chef's journey into healthier baked goods for her family. She makes everything look delicious, beautiful and it even takes great!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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