Good Without God by Greg M. Epstein | Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Good without God: What a Billion Nonreligious People Do Believe
  • Alternative view 1 of Good without God: What a Billion Nonreligious People Do Believe
  • Alternative view 2 of Good without God: What a Billion Nonreligious People Do Believe

Good without God: What a Billion Nonreligious People Do Believe

3.5 29
by Greg M. Epstein
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

An inspiring and provocative exploration of an alternative to traditional religion

Questions about the role of God and religion in today's world have never been more relevant or felt more powerfully. Many of us are searching for a place where we can find not only facts and scientific reason but also hope and moral courage. For some,

Overview

An inspiring and provocative exploration of an alternative to traditional religion

Questions about the role of God and religion in today's world have never been more relevant or felt more powerfully. Many of us are searching for a place where we can find not only facts and scientific reason but also hope and moral courage. For some, answers are found in the divine. For others, including the New Atheists, religion is an "enemy."

But in Good Without God, Greg Epstein presents another, more balanced and inclusive response: Humanism. He highlights humanity's potential for goodness and the ways in which Humanists lead lives of purpose and compassion. Humanism can offer the sense of community we want and often need in good times and bad—and it teaches us that we can lead good and moral lives without the supernatural, without higher powers . . . without God.

Editorial Reviews

Ten percent of Americans and over one billion people worldwide are nonreligious, but media figures still registered surprised when President Barack Obama mentioned the "nonbelievers" in his inaugural address earlier this year. Greg Epstein, the humanist chaplain of Harvard University, maintains that nonbelievers are, in a sense, believers and deserve a seat at the interfaith table. In Good Without God, he speaks affirmatively and non-combatively about humanism and its relationship to other alternatives. A refreshing break from the Religion vs. Atheism range wars. Now in paperback.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780061670121
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
10/26/2010
Pages:
272
Sales rank:
524,952
Product dimensions:
5.30(w) x 7.90(h) x 0.90(d)

Meet the Author

The Humanist chaplain at Harvard University, Greg M. Epstein holds a B.A. in religion and Chinese and an M.A. in Judaic studies from the University of Michigan, and an M.A. in theological studies from the Harvard Divinity School. He is a regular contributor to "On Faith," an online forum on religion produced by Newsweek and the Washington Post.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Good without God: What a Billion Nonreligious People Do Believe 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 29 reviews.
Secular_American More than 1 year ago
This is an excellent book on several levels. For nonreligious people who felt that there was no movement or community for them, Epstein demonstrates that indeed there is. For those who are unfamiliar with Humanism, Epstein explains its history and concepts in a clear, readable way. For those who are religious but wish to better understand their secular neighbors, Epstein brilliantly provides that insight. Most importantly, Epstein provides a practical guide for Secular Americans who wish to see their movement go to the next level. Rather than dismiss religion outright as silly and outdated, Epstein thoughtfully considers all aspects of religion and suggests that the secular community utilize those aspects (community, emotional support, etc.) that can be utilized without sacrificing honest naturalism. Richard Dawkins, Sam Harris, Daniel Dennett and Christopher Hitchens may have debunked religion very effectively in recent years, but Epstein provides the real roadmap for a successful Humanist movement. Considering there has never been a book about Humanism by a major publisher in America, this excellent book will most likely go down as a groundbreaking, important milestone in the Humanist movement.
Patchee More than 1 year ago
Often I am asked about my Humanist lifestance by others who are interested in Humanism or by those who do not understand this philosophy. I can now direct them to a book that solidifies my views of tolerance and human flourishing and that is not anti-religious like some of the "new atheists" books out there. A perfect gift for those who no longer believe in "organized" religion and/or God and is looking for something to replace the void.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The concepts raised are good, although the history of humanism is a little long winded. I lost interest in reading this book after 2/3 of the way. I like the concepts, but there was so little context i couldn't stay interested.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago