Googled: The End of the World As We Know It

Googled: The End of the World As We Know It

3.8 61
by Ken Auletta
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

"The fullest account yet of the rise of one of the most profitable, most powerful, and oddest businesses the world has ever seen."
-San Francisco Chronicle

Just eleven years old, Google has profoundly transformed the way we live and work-we've all been Googled. Esteemed media writer Ken Auletta uses the story of Google's rise to explore the

Overview

"The fullest account yet of the rise of one of the most profitable, most powerful, and oddest businesses the world has ever seen."
-San Francisco Chronicle

Just eleven years old, Google has profoundly transformed the way we live and work-we've all been Googled. Esteemed media writer Ken Auletta uses the story of Google's rise to explore the future of media at large. This book is based on the most extensive cooperation ever granted a journalist, including access to closed-door meetings and interviews with industry legends, including Google founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin, Marc Andreessen, and media guru "Coach" Bill Campbell. Auletta's unmatched analysis, vivid details, and rich anecdotes illuminate how the Google wave grew, how it threatens to drown media institutions, and where it's taking us next.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“This is an engrossing look at Google and the broader trends in information and entertainment in the Internet age.”—Booklist, Starred Review

“[A] savvy profile of the Internet search octopus….[and] a sharp and probing analysis of the apocalyptic upheavals in the media and entertainment industries.”—Publishers Weekly

“Auletta uncovers some endlessly colorful material and assesses [Google’s] prospects critically but fairly.”—Kirkus Reviews

“Auletta has captured something critical and true about the tribe that made the enormous success of Google possible. His understanding is critical and essential for anyone trying to predict how long this run of enormous success will continue. Bottom line: Not forever, and maybe not much longer. Here's exactly why.”—Larry Lessig, author of Remix: Making Art and Commerce Thrive in the Hybrid Economy and Free Culture: The Nature and Future of Creativity

“A uniquely incisive account of the new Internet revolution, powered by Ken Auletta’s unparalleled access. Essential reading.”—Marc Andreessen, founder of Netscape and co-founder of Ning

"Ken Auletta has produced the seminal book about media in the digital age. It is a triumph of reporting and analysis, filled with revealing scenes, fascinating tales, and candid interviews. Google is both a driver and a symbol of a glorious disruption in the media world, and Auletta chronicles, in a balance and thoughtful way, both that glory and that disruption."—Walter Isaacson, author of Einstein: His Life and Universe and Benjamin Franklin: An American Life

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780143118046
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
10/26/2010
Pages:
432
Sales rank:
1,343,520
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 8.30(h) x 1.00(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Meet the Author

Ken Auletta has written the “Annals of Communications” column and profiles for The New Yorker since 1992. He is the author of eight books, including Three Blind Mice, Greed and Glory on Wall Street, and World War 3.0. In naming him America’s premier media critic, the Columbia Journalism Review said, “No other reporter has covered the new communications revolution as thoroughly as has Auletta.” He lives in Manhattan with his wife and daughter.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Googled: The End of the World as We Know It 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 61 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Fuk.
Booknut62 More than 1 year ago
This book effectively combines a biography of sorts that focuses on Google as a company, and on its impact on media specifically and the world more generally. Throughout its pages, Auletta offers readers stories from inside the company, and these stories effectively illustrate the culture of Google. In addition, Mr. Auletta effectively captures the personalities of the founders and other leaders of this company, which provides valuable insight in how Google has come to be the corporate powerhouse that it is. Auletta's book is a critical look at Google's rise of power, its business practices, and its powerful ambitions. It is a must read for anyone who wants to experience a portrait of a truly "disruptive" company that is still making waves in the world of modern media.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Once upon a time there was five little girl
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Is this the best book evef?
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Shantouman More than 1 year ago
Mr. Auletta's reputation and seat at the New Yorker give him unprecedented access to his subjects. His skill as an interviewer generates answers that permit him insights missing elsewhere in the oft trod ground of the growing Google empire. The rapid development of Google and the unusual personalities and relationship between its two founders are the driving force of 3/4 of the book. In Part 4 that carries the title of the book GOOGLED, the author marshals his years of media reporting and writes with nuance as he looks into the next chapters of our increasingly Googled world. There is more than imagination at work here. There are the educated insights of a reporter challenged by his subject. Peter M. Herford 20 Feb 2010