Goose's Story

Goose's Story

by Best, Holly Meade
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Every spring, the geese touch down on the pond in a honking, flapping celebration. But this year, one of them is different. As it stands on one leg--shunned by the other geese, unable to search for food, to swim, or even to fly away--a young girl wonders: how can a goose with one foot survive?

"A heartwarming story with a tender message about accepting

See more details below

  • Checkmark Kids' Club Eligible  Shop Now

Overview

Every spring, the geese touch down on the pond in a honking, flapping celebration. But this year, one of them is different. As it stands on one leg--shunned by the other geese, unable to search for food, to swim, or even to fly away--a young girl wonders: how can a goose with one foot survive?

"A heartwarming story with a tender message about accepting others in spite of their differences and helping those who are less able." --Starred, School Library Journal

"Best's simple prose is rhythmic and beautiful . . . Every child who has nursed an injured creature will recognize the bond, the distance, and the hope. " --Starred, Booklist

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Best's story will appeal to young nature lovers and to anyone with a soft spot for an underdog . . . Mead's paper-collage illustrations capture the action as well as the glory of the passing seasons." —Starred, School Library Journal

Children's Literature
A young girl and her dog follow closely the development of a goose with one leg, from when the flock arrives in the spring through the summer until September, when they all have gone. The girl thinks about her goose all through the months at school. When the geese return, her goose has acquired a friend and eventually, to the girl's delight, a bunch of goslings. The rather sentimental story is made special by Meade's use of collage to create the geese. Wing and body shapes are boldly painted with feather-like markings, then combined to produce solid, animated fowl. The family members and settings are treated with less detail, keeping our focus on the geese. The book is based on a true story; a photo of the actual one-legged goose appears on the title page. 2002, Melanie Kroupa Books/Farrar Straus and Giroux, $16.00. Ages 4 to 8. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 3-When a girl and her dog, Henry, greet the Canada geese as they return in the spring, she notices that one has been injured and is missing a foot. The others in the flock shun the goose, but the child worries about it. Her parents warn her not to interfere-the animal must grow strong on its own to survive. Saddened by its plight, the youngster can't help herself; she and her dog observe, talk to, and sometimes feed the bird. Over the summer, the creature begins to hobble on one leg and eventually swim, but the family still wonders how it will get up enough speed to fly. Then one day, all the geese are gone. After worrying all winter, the child and Henry hear honking from above in early spring, and welcome back "their" goose-and her mate. Based on an experience with a real goose that landed in the author's yard, Best's story will appeal to young nature lovers and to anyone with a soft spot for an underdog. Meade's paper-collage illustrations capture the action as well as the glory of the passing seasons. This is a heartwarming story with a tender message about accepting others in spite of their differences and helping those who are less able.-Jeanne Clancy Watkins, Chester County Library, Exton, PA Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Early one spring, a girl is delighted when a flock of Canada geese arrive in her yard, but she is stricken when she realizes one of the geese has an injured foot. The next day, the foot is gone, and the girl wonders how a one-legged goose can possibly survive. In spite of her parents' advice to let the wild animal learn to survive on its own, the girl feeds Goose cracked corn and keeps an eye out for her. One day in the fall, the geese are gone-all of them. The seasons turn, and the geese return, but this time, it's only two: Goose, still with a foot missing, and a big, healthy gander. Best of all, seven goslings soon appear-all with both feet intact. The heartbreaking, ultimately hopeful story is based on a real goose from author Best's (Shrinking Violet, 2001, etc.) own yard, making the happy ending touching rather than overly sentimental. The interplay between the text and the earthy, cut-paper illustrations is remarkable; while the text does not spell out what's happened to Goose's foot, the images of the injured limb evoke shock and sadness. Meade (Queenie Farmer Had Fifteen Daughters, p. 488, etc.) employs a woodsy palette of browns, greens, and blues. A variety of perspectives draws readers into the text: some scenes are portrayed from the girl's point of view, others from Goose's, some from the ground, some from the sky. Art and story complement each another again at the end: the final, spot illustration of Goose nuzzling one of her goslings on the pond while the girl's oar drips in the background is an enlarged portion of the previous spread, and the girl's amazed words repeat: " ‘Look at you,' I whisper, ‘Look at you.' " Quietly joyful, satisfyingly optimistic. (Picture book.5-8)

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780374400323
Publisher:
Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Publication date:
10/13/2009
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.30(w) x 10.30(h) x 0.20(d)
Lexile:
430L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >