Gothic Radicalism

Overview

Applying ideas drawn from contemporary critical theory, this book historicizes psychoanalysis through a new and significant theorization of the Gothic. The central premise is that the nineteenth-century Gothic produced a radical critique of accounts of sublimity and Freudian psychoanalysis. This book makes a major contribution to an understanding of both the nineteenth century and the Gothic discourse which challenged the dominant ideas of that period. Writers explored include Mary Shelley, Edgar Allan Poe, ...

See more details below
Hardcover
$136.41
BN.com price
(Save 14%)$160.00 List Price
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (6) from $144.58   
  • New (4) from $144.58   
  • Used (2) from $160.58   
Sending request ...

Overview

Applying ideas drawn from contemporary critical theory, this book historicizes psychoanalysis through a new and significant theorization of the Gothic. The central premise is that the nineteenth-century Gothic produced a radical critique of accounts of sublimity and Freudian psychoanalysis. This book makes a major contribution to an understanding of both the nineteenth century and the Gothic discourse which challenged the dominant ideas of that period. Writers explored include Mary Shelley, Edgar Allan Poe, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Bram Stoker.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
In light of contemporary critical theory, Smith (English, U. of Glamorgan, Wales) reconsiders the relationship between the 19th- century Gothic, theories of the sublime, and Freudian psychoanalysis. He identifies a specific Gothic history that rewrites the dominant intellectual history of the time. Among the writers he examines are Mary Shelley, Edgar Allan Poe, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Bram Stoker. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
From The Critics
Smiths work is interesting because it is neither historical or biographical but rather a theoretical synthesis which demands that reader accept rather unconditionally the grounding assumptions of his analysis A thing I found difficult to do without addressing all of his sources in a very exacting manner which is really an impossible task for any reviewer.

He blends three major historical currents of the west together the Enlightenment, The Romantic, and the Modern with the historical the literary and the psychoanalytic and using contemporary literary theory to make his argument, which he concisely states in the preface page viii. . "The Subject of this study is the Gothic rewriting of the tradition of idealistic though one which begins with Burke and ends with Freud. A range of critical methodologies is used to draw out this Gothic History, which employs a range of writings from Marry Shelly to Bram Stoker."

I thought it useful to the inform the potential reader of the progression in Smith's argument by including is table of contents as follows which maps the structure of his argument

Acknowledgments Introduction—- The Gothic and the Sublime Frankenstein: Sublimity Reconsidered, Foucault and Kristeva History and the Sublime Utterance: Gothic Voyages, Going Public with the Private The Urban Sublime: Kant and Poe Textuality and Sublimity in Dracula Freud's Uncanny Sublime Afterword Notes Index. From my standpoint as a scholar I wish a separate bibliography were included with the text.

As an informed but resistant reader I found the work challenging. Because one must ask the following question. Is Smith Using contemporary literary theory in an appropriate, or an opportunistic manner. A colleague and myself spent an excruciating intense 45 minutes on Chapter II The Gothic and the Sublime Frankenstein: Sublimity pages 38- 39 trying establishing exactly what he was driving at as he developed a relationship Mary Shelly's characterization of the Sublime and Focault's conception of miss recognition. Leading to a very uncomfortable state of affairs for both of us.

I have since decided that this is not an effective approach to a critical text. Because in order to make any reading whatsoever it is necessary to grant the author some sort of Rhetorical license For me perhaps the greatest problem with the book was that perhaps Smith gave too little to the reader, and at the same time asked too much.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780312230425
  • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
  • Publication date: 4/1/2000
  • Pages: 200
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.62 (d)

Meet the Author

Andrew Smith is Lecturer in English Studies at the University of Glamorgarr.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

The Gothic and the Sublime
Frankenstein
• History and the Sublime
• Sublime Utterance
• The Urban Sublime
• Textuality and Sublimity in Dracula
• Freud's Uncanny Sublime

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)