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Overview

This book provides a thorough basis for understanding the entire governmental accounting and reporting framework for all funds and account groups. All content is up-to-date, with the latest GASB standards, the latest FASB and AICPA guidance on accounting and reporting for not-for-profit organizations, and the latest changes in federal government accounting and reporting. This incredibly comprehensive yet readable book starts with an overview of governmental and nonprofit accounting basics, and is then divided into 3 sections: state and local government accounting and reporting; federal and not-for-profit organization accounting and reporting; and public sector auditing. The recent principle standard, GASB Statement 34, is discussed and applied throughout. For governmental accountants, nonprofit group accountants, and accountants in not-for-profit organizations.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780130661913
  • Publisher: Pearson Education
  • Publication date: 5/1/2002
  • Series: Charles T. Horngren Series in Accounting
  • Edition description: 7TH
  • Edition number: 7
  • Pages: 785
  • Product dimensions: 8.58 (w) x 11.26 (h) x 1.35 (d)

Table of Contents

1. Governmental and Nonprofit Accounting: Environment and Characteristics.

I. STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTING AND REPORTING.

2. State and Local Government Accounting Concepts, Objectives, and Principles.
3. Budgeting, Budgetary Accounting, and Budgetary Reporting.
4. General and Special Revenue Funds.
5. Revenue Accounting—Governmental Funds.
6. Expenditure Accounting—Governmental Funds.
7. Capital Projects Funds.
8. Debt Service Funds.
9. General Capital Assets; General Long-Term Liabilities; Permanent Funds: Introduction to Interfund-GCA-GLTL Accounting.
10. Enterprise Funds.
11. Internal Service Funds.
12. Trust and Agency (Fiduciary) Funds Summary of Interfund-GCA-GLTL Accounting.
13. Financial Reporting: The Basic Financial Statements.
14. Financial Reporting: Deriving Government-Wide Financial Statements and Required Reconciliations.
15. Financial Reporting: The Comprehensive Annual Financial Report and the Financial Reporting Entity.

II. FEDERAL AND NOT-FOR-PROFIT ORGANIZATION ACCOUNTING AND REPORTING.

16. Non-SLG Not-for-Profit Organizations: SFAS 116 and 117 Approach.
17. Accounting for Colleges and Universities.
18. Accounting for Health Care Organizations.
19. Federal Government Accounting.

III. PUBLIC SECTOR AUDITING.

20. Auditing.
Index.

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Preface

The past several years have brought dramatic changes in governmental accounting and financial reporting:
  • In June 1999, the Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) issued the most significant government accounting standards in over 65 years.
  • The principal standard, GASB Statement 34, "Basic Financial Statements-and Management's Discussion and Analysis—for State and Local Governments," requires governments to use a new financial reporting model that incorporates government-wide, revenue- and expense-based financial statements alongside improved traditional fund financial statements. Depending on their size, governments must apply Statement 34 as early as years ending after June 15, 2002.
  • The GASB continues to develop related standards and implementation guides even as the first governments prepare financial statements under the new financial reporting model.
  • The Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) recently instituted major changes in financial reporting by nongovernment not-for-profit entities through two major pronouncements—Statements of Financial Accounting Standards (SFASs) 116 and 117.
  • In 2002 the US, General Accounting Office issued a far-reaching new "independence" standard.

This is the dynamic and challenging environment students face as they learn this new accounting discipline and as they enter professional careers in the near future.

To address these changes and help students succeed, we use what we call an "evolutionary approach to revolutionary change." This sound and logical approach incorporates both new features and tried-and-true elements of this text. Those who have beeninvolved in governmental and not-for-profit accounting for some time will find many familiar elements in this text, including:

  • updated coverage of fund accounting and reporting built upon proven pedagogical methods
  • governmental funds with the same accounting equation and essentially the same financial statements as before GASB Statement 34
  • modified accrual accounting for governmental funds and accrual accounting for proprietary funds and trust funds

You will also find many noteworthy differences, including:

  • logical, incisive coverage of the new reporting model instituted by GASB Statement 34, including a practical, understandable approach to deriving the new government-wide financial statements from the fund information
  • coverage of two new fund types as well as new definitions of some other fund types
  • government-wide financial statements, as well as newly revised fund financial statements
  • new presentations of proprietary fund equity and operations
  • major fund reporting and government-wide reporting
  • explanation and illustration of how governments derive the information reported in government-wide financial statements without maintaining two sets of records
  • updated material that incorporates the relevant portions of all authoritative pronouncements issued through 2002 (including GASB Statement 39 on affiliated organizations, Statement 38 on note disclosures; Statement 37, which amends several Statement 34 requirements; Statement 35, which requires government colleges and universities to apply Statement 34; and Interpretation 6 on governmental fund accounting and financial reporting)

We have thus retained the successful approach, comprehensiveness, and other strengths that have long been hallmarks of this text. In addition, we have further refined and improved the emphasis on the foundational aspects of governmental accounting and financial reporting—such as the nature and purposes of the various accounting entities—and the unique approach for teaching the state and 'local government accounting and reporting model that has proven so successful.

MAJOR CONTENT CHANGES

The seventh edition of the text incorporates these pervasive changes in government financial reporting. The most dramatic changes in the text are found in the financial reporting chapters. Particularly noteworthy changes in the text include:

  • Chapter 2, State and Local Government Accounting: Concepts, Objectives, and Principles. Several of the principles of governmental accounting changed as a result of GASB Statement 34. These changes, particularly in fund types and fund type definitions, classification and treatment of interfund transactions, and financial reporting requirements, are introduced in this chapter.
  • Chapter 4, General and Special Revenue Funds. Although very similar to the previous edition overall, this chapter has been revised to reflect changes in budgetary reporting, accounting for and reporting interfund transactions, and new reporting classifications in the governmental fund operating statement.
  • Chapter 5, Revenue Accounting—Governmental Funds. This chapter incorporates GASB Statement 33, "Accounting for Nonexchange Transactions."
  • Chapter 6, Expenditure Accounting—Governmental Funds. This chapter builds on earlier discussions of GASB Interpretation 6.
  • Chapter 9, General Capital Assets; General Long-Term Liabilities; Permanent Funds: Introduction to Interfund-GCA-GLTL Accounting. This chapter is revised to be consistent with the new terminology used for general capital assets and general long-term liabilities. It also is revised to explain and illustrate one way that governments can capture and maintain the information on these assets and liabilities required for government-wide financial reporting. Finally, the chapter explains the new requirements on reporting general government infrastructure capital assets, as well as the modified approach permitted for accounting for these assets.
  • Chapter 10, Enterprise Funds. This and the following two chapters have been reordered to present information in a sequence and manner that is most consistent with the new financial reporting requirements. Chapter 10 explains the new definition of Enterprise Funds and the changes in Enterprise Fund reporting—particularly the changes in the reporting of fund equity and the presentation of operating statement information.
  • Chapter 12, Trust and Agency (Fiduciary) Funds: Summary of Interfund-GCA-GLTL Accounting. This chapter explains and illustrates the nature, definitions, and reporting of the new fiduciary fund types. The changes are significant.
  • Chapter 13, Financial Reporting: The Basic Financial Statements. This and the following two chapters explain and illustrate financial reporting requirements, financial reports, and deriving government-wide financial statement data under the requirements of the new reporting model. These chapters are critical to students' understanding of the new financial reporting model and of government financial reporting in this new era. They provide an effective and efficient vehicle for students to gain an in-depth understanding of the basic financial statements required by Statement 34, how to derive the government-wide statement data using the fund accounting and reporting knowledge gained in their study of the first 12 chapters, and the requirements for a Comprehensive Annual Financial Report. Chapter 13 is a new chapter that discusses and illustrates the basic financial state menu required by Statement 34 and explains the requirements for the notes to the financial statements and for Management's Discussion and Analysis and other required supplementary information. This chapter explains the unique aspects of fund financial statements and of government-wide financial statements in depth.
  • Chapter 14, Financial Reporting: Deriving Government-Wide Financial Statements and Required Reconciliations. This is another new chapter. In practice, governments capture most of the information required for preparing fund financial statements in their accounts. Data for reporting the government-wide financial statements are derived through a yearend conversion process that uses the data in the fund financial statements as a starting point. Government-wide financial statement data typically is not captured directly in the accounts. To convert fund financial statement data to government-wide financial statement data requires a sound understanding of both fund financial statements and government-wide financial statements, which is why we cover the government-wide statements in Chapter 13—before deriving the statement data in this chapter. Chapter 14 is more than a "how-to" chapter. The chapter explains and illustrates the differences between fund reporting and government-wide reporting that must be addressed to derive government-wide financial statement data. It also discusses and diagrams the process required so that students understand the reasons for and context of each step in the process.
  • Chapter 15, Financial Reporting: The Comprehensive Annual Financial Report and the Financial Reporting Entity. This chapter completes the coverage of state and local government financial reporting by explaining the components and requirements for a Comprehensive Annum Financial Report. It also addresses financial reporting when a government has component units and how to determine whether another entity should be treated as a component unit in a government's financial statements. GASB Statement 39 on affiliated organizations is discussed in this chapter.
  • Chapter 16, Non-SLG Not-For-Profit Organizations: SFAS 116 and 117 Approach. This chapter covers nongovernment not-for-profit organization accounting and reporting in the context of voluntary health and welfare organizations and other nonprofit organizations. It covers the requirements of FASB Statements 116 and 117 on not-for-profit accounting and has been updated for recent changes, including FASB Statement 136 on accounting for transfers of assets to not-for-profit entities that raise contributions for others. Chapter 16 was moved to precede the chapters on college and university accounting and hospital accounting, which have both government and nongovernment not-for-profit counterparts. This arrangement permits us to cover both government and nongovernment not-for-profit reporting requirements for colleges and universities and for hospitals in a concise manner.
  • Chapter 17, Accounting for Colleges and Universities. This chapter has been revised and simplified significantly. Government college and university reporting requirements are discussed and illustrated first. Because most government colleges and universities are expected to report using Enterprise Fund accounting principles and statements under the provisions of GASB Statement 35, we discuss and illustrate government college and university reporting in the context of a specific purpose government engaged only in business-type activities. Nongovernment not-for-profit college and university financial reporting is illustrated briefly at the end of the chapter. Both the coverage of not-for-profit organization accounting and reporting from Chapter 16 and the coverage of unique aspects of college and university accounting and financial reporting in the first part of this chapter are utilized to explain nongovernment not-for-profit college and university accounting and reporting.
  • Chapter 18, Accounting for Health Care Organizations. Because of the impact of the new GASB standards, government hospital accounting is discussed and illustrated in the context of a specific purpose government engaged only in business-type activities. Nongovernment not-for-profit hospital financial reporting is illustrated briefly at the end of the chapter using Chapter 16 and the first part of this chapter as building blocks.
  • Chapter 19, Federal Government Accounting. This chapter has been updated for recent changes in federal financial management and in accounting and reporting for federal agencies. Bruce K. Michelson of the U.S. General Accounting Office provided invaluable assistance in determining the appropriate depth of coverage for this important chapter and in updating for changes since the last edition.
  • Chapter 20, Auditing Governments and Not-for-Profit Organizations. This chapter has been updated for changes through early 2002.

NEW PEDAGOGICAL FEATURES

Several important new and improved pedagogical features have been integrated into this text.

THE "1-1-1 APPROACH"

Most students are more successful and efficient when they learn one approach to addressing one issue at one time. The government and not-for-profit field proves challenging to students in part because they are exposed to several different approaches to accounting and reporting for many types of transactions and events for a number of types of entities in one semester (or less). Likewise, most students find it confusing to learn how to account for each transaction of a single government under the model required for governmental fund financial reporting at the very same time that they learn how to report the transaction in the government-wide, revenue- and expense-based model.

Students will be far more successful if they first master the fund accounting and financial reporting model; then, using this and other prior knowledge as a base, learn how to derive the government-wide financial statements. Students are able to learn how to account using one approach, and later to use what they have learned to master a second approach more easily.

CONTEXT-CENTERED LEARNING

When a new topic is introduced in this text, it is addressed in a context that has meaning to students. For instance, we discuss details of accounting for governmental fund revenues and expenditures only after students understand the basics of accounting and reporting for the most significant governmental fund—the General Fund. More importantly, we explain accounting and reporting for individual funds, general capital assets, and general long-term liabilities only after helping students understand the overall accounting and reporting model of which they are a part. Students are better able to understand the nature and role of each individual fund if they understand the overall model, or context, in which that fund fits.

CONCRETE LEARNING VS. ABSTRACT DISCUSSION

While we are careful to cover the logic and theory behind accounting and reporting for governments and not-for-profit organizations, students learn best when they apply knowledge. For example, concrete learning has proven very helpful in improving students' initial understanding of the government accounting and reporting model and the related principles. Therefore, we have retained our unique approach to introducing students to the state and local government model. This transaction analysis-based approach allows students to understand and apply the government model better and quicker than other approaches. It combines a strong emphasis on the underlying nature of the various fund types and nonfund accounts with transaction analysis. Transaction analysis using the accounting equations of the various fund types and nonfund accounts gets students out of the business accounting mindset and helps them understand how the pieces of the government model complement one another.

Many who have used prior editions of the text have attested to the effectiveness of this approach in the college classroom. This pedagogy enables students to grasp concepts and principles at an early stage that most would not otherwise understand until well into the course. Indeed, for many, this "concrete-learning" approach provides the key to unlock the door to understanding state and local government accounting and financial reporting.

"JUST-IN-TIME" PROGRESSION

Care has been taken in the text—both among and within chapters—to order material in a manner that ensures students have mastered other topics that understanding of a new topic depends on. To the extent possible, we introduce prerequisite material close to when it is needed for understanding other topics. Likewise, there is a progression from simple scenarios to related, but more complex, scenarios. One of the many places that this can be observed is in the explanation of how Internal Service Fund data is incorporated in government-wide financial statements. (See Figure 14-11 on pages 548-549.)

REAL WORLD COMPATIBILITY

The text reflects, to the extent practicable, the way things are actually accomplished in practice. Indeed, we lead seminars for government accounting, reporting, and auditing practitioners each year. The material that we use to instruct professionals is strikingly similar to what is in this book—not only in content but also in approach. Therefore, students who use this text will recognize and be able to contribute to government and not-for-profit accounting and reporting immediately upon entering the professional workplace—whether as government officials, auditors, or consultants.

REINFORCEMENT TOOLS: PROBLEM MATERIALS AND COMPREHENSIVE CASE

This textbook has a rich pool of problem material ranging from simple to complex and from single-topic to multitopic questions, exercises, and problems. These should help instructors design a work plan that enhances student understanding of the subject chatter in each chapter.

A significant new feature of this edition is a comprehensive case covering the accounting activities and financial reports for a hypothetical city. This comprehensive case addresses many key issues in Chapters 4 through 15, as it gives students a continuing experience in accounting for and reporting on the activities of a small government for an entire year. Further, the suggested solution approach uses a worksheet—preferably an electronic worksheet—though a worksheet approach is not essential.

  • The worksheet solution approach provides a time-efficient method for students to make journal entries, develop trial balances, and prepare both fund-based and government-wide financial statements for the illustrative government.
  • It also familiarizes students with a tool they will need regularly in practice but typically receive little exposure to in classrooms.
  • Solving the case using the worksheet method also should help students when they study the fund-to-government-wide data conversion in Chapter 14, because they should be comfortable with the use of worksheets and will have the fund data in worksheets as they start the process of deriving the government-wide financial statements.

The comprehensive case is a valuable adjunct to our other exercises and problems, whether it is done by worksheet or by journal entries and non-worksheet calculations. The comprehensive case is a valuable new pedagogical tool—regardless of how it is solved.

Finally, the comprehensive case is designed so that you can assign the case problems for most chapters individually even if you do not assign the entire case. Therefore, except in Chapters 13 to 15, which depend upon information from solutions to the case problems in other chapters, instructors who do not assign the entire case can view the case problems as additional problem material for each individual chapter. In other words, the case need not be an "all or nothing" assignment.

INSTRUCTOR AND STUDENT RESOURCES

Several supplements accompany the seventh edition to aid instructors with preparing lectures, examinations, and homework solutions. Less time on these details means more potential time available for you to work face-to-face with your students. This maximizes the availability of their best pedagogical tool: You! These enhanced resources include:

NEW! POWERPOINT SLIDES

The seventh edition includes a comprehensive set of PowerPoint slides ready for classroom use. Available on the Web site professors have a ready-made slide presentation. You also have the luxury of editing the slides to meet your classroom needs. Prepared by Barry Atwood of Florida International University, the slides also help facilitate lecture preparation both by making it less time consuming and by providing useful teaching and learning aids.

SOLUTIONS MANUAL

Prepared by the authors, the Solutions Manual provides suggested solutions to each question, exercise, and problem in the text. Opt either for the printed version or download an electronic version. Instructors will need to obtain a password from their Prentice Hall book representative.

INSTRUCTOR'S RESOURCE MANUAL

Also prepared by the authors, the Instructor's Resource Manual provides detailed outlines and teaching suggestions for each chapter of the text. Overhead transparency masters of selected figures are also included. This resource can be accessed at the password-protected Web site.

TEST BANK

Written by Dr. Bruce Chase, a well-recognized government and not-for-profit accounting expert who serves on the faculty of Radford University, this newly revised Test Bank includes a variety of testing materials, including multiple choice questions, other objective questions, essay questions, journal entry problems, and financial statement preparation problems. An invaluable resource regardless of your testing style, the Test Bank is available to instructors in printed form and electronically.

NEW! SOLUTION TEMPLATES FOR THE COMPREHENSIVE CASE

To allow students to receive maximum benefit from the new comprehensive case included in the seventh edition, the authors have provided electronic solution templates for solving the case problems. The templates are available on the Web site.

NEW! COMPANION WEB SITE

Bookmark and enjoy the ease of accessing materials online. Once you receive your instructor password from your Prentice Hall book representative, you can access the Solutions Manual and Instructor's Resource Manual. Both instructors and students can access the PowerPoint slides as well as links to other useful Web sites, such as pertinent financial statement examples of various government and not-for profit organizations. In addition, access the password-protected Web site for periodic updates to testing materials and other instructor resources.

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