Grading Health Care: The Science and Art of Developing Consumer Scorecards

Overview

Informing Health Care Purchasers

In today's competitive marketplace, health care providers, corporate purchasers, and health care executives are focusing their attention on quality, value, and accountability.

This valuable resource provides health care practitioners, administrators, and policymakers with the pertinent information they need to create a scientific method of ...

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Overview

Informing Health Care Purchasers

In today's competitive marketplace, health care providers, corporate purchasers, and health care executives are focusing their attention on quality, value, and accountability.

This valuable resource provides health care practitioners, administrators, and policymakers with the pertinent information they need to create a scientific method of measuring customer satisfaction.

The book contains black-and-white illustrations.

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Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Mary Ann Stump, BS, CPHQ (Blue Cross Blue Shield of Minnesota)
Description: This book presents a series of eight articles relevant to the development of consumer score cards for healthcare. The authors are all individuals who are members of the Oregon Consumer Scorecard Consortium who have particular expertise in health policy, health services research, health program evaluation, and/or healthcare delivery.
Purpose: The purpose is to present the "lessons learned" from the Oregon Consumer Scorecard Consortium Demonstration Project. The authors hope to provide a "road map" or description of the process of developing report cards to facilitate consumer choice in selecting managed care organizations and healthcare providers. The authors also intend to provide guidance and support to others who wish to develop such consumer report cards.
Audience: The audience consists of policy makers, healthcare administrators, healthcare providers, and health service researchers who are interested in developing or interpreting consumer report cards.
Features: The eight chapters cover different issues and perspectives relevant to developing consumer report cards. The first chapter provides an introduction to the issues of "reporting quality in a market driven healthcare system." This is followed by chapters that describe focus group efforts to elicit the dimensions of consumer preference. Theoretical and practical issues in measuring consumer preferences and care quality are then discussed. A concluding chapter highlights the lessons learned by the consortium. A very helpful appendix presents actual examples of the consumer guide developed through this project.
Assessment: This book contains important information and informative lessons in the rapidly evolving area of consumer-oriented report cards on healthcare organizations. It is strongest in its effort to provide the point of view and lessons learned from this specific consumer report card project. The more general chapters provide a helpful introduction for individuals new to the issues in this area. Likewise, the sections on the use of focus groups in the development of measures are interesting and helpful introductory material. Nonetheless, policy makers and health services researchers will need to look elsewhere for a current, in depth literature review on this large and complex subject. Similarly, group practice managers and other healthcare administrators hoping to develop their own consumer score cards will likely need other resources to develop their own consumer report card program.
From the Publisher
"Consumer choice and quality scorecards have been the subject of an extraordinary amount of rhetoric in the health care field. Finally, Hanes, Greenlick, and their colleagues have done us the enormous service of providing a thoughtful, comprehensive, and balanced exploration of the real issues." —Bruce Vladeck, former administrator, Health Care Financing Administration, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 1993-1997

"Grading Health Care is truly a first of its kind in a health care environment that is in great need of such practical guidance. Pamela Hanes and Mitch Greenlick have pulled together a series of easily understood, provocative essays on the art and science of quality reporting for a consumer audience. This book is must-reading for anyone interested in working through the complexities of translating abstract and often elusive quality information into understandable and consumer-friAndly formats." —Philip Lee, professor emeritus, University of California San Francisco Medical School and former assistant secretary of Health 1992-1997

"Consumer choice and quality scorecards have been the subject of an extraordinary amount of rhetoric in the health care field. Finally, Hanes, Greenlick, and their colleagues have done us the enormous service of providing a thoughtful, comprehensive, and balanced exploration of the real issues." —Bruce Vadeck, former HCFA administrator (1993-97)

"The Oregon Scorecard Project and this book has, for the first time, brought together commonsense science and deep commitment to listen to the consumer and has produced new knowledge and insights in this complex area." —Clifton R. Gaus, former director of the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 1992-1996

Mary Ann Stump
This book presents a series of eight articles relevant to the development of consumer score cards for healthcare. The authors are all individuals who are members of the Oregon Consumer Scorecard Consortium who have particular expertise in health policy, health services research, health program evaluation, and/or healthcare delivery. The purpose is to present the ""lessons learned"" from the Oregon Consumer Scorecard Consortium Demonstration Project. The authors hope to provide a ""road map"" or description of the process of developing report cards to facilitate consumer choice in selecting managed care organizations and healthcare providers. The authors also intend to provide guidance and support to others who wish to develop such consumer report cards. The audience consists of policy makers, healthcare administrators, healthcare providers, and health service researchers who are interested in developing or interpreting consumer report cards. The eight chapters cover different issues and perspectives relevant to developing consumer report cards. The first chapter provides an introduction to the issues of ""reporting quality in a market driven healthcare system."" This is followed by chapters that describe focus group efforts to elicit the dimensions of consumer preference. Theoretical and practical issues in measuring consumer preferences and care quality are then discussed. A concluding chapter highlights the lessons learned by the consortium. A very helpful appendix presents actual examples of the consumer guide developed through this project. This book contains important information and informative lessons in the rapidly evolving area of consumer-oriented report cards onhealthcare organizations. It is strongest in its effort to provide the point of view and lessons learned from this specific consumer report card project. The more general chapters provide a helpful introduction for individuals new to the issues in this area. Likewise, the sections on the use of focus groups in the development of measures are interesting and helpful introductory material. Nonetheless, policy makers and health services researchers will need to look elsewhere for a current, in depth literature review on this large and complex subject. Similarly, group practice managers and other healthcare administrators hoping to develop their own consumer score cards will likely need other resources to develop their own consumer report card program.
Booknews
Members of the Oregon Consumer Scorecard Consortium relate the process and results of their attempts to create a method for determining consumer satisfaction in health care. Topics include reporting quality; scorecard development; consumer preferences; consumer needs; special populations; eliciting, measuring, and reporting consumer satisfaction; measuring quality of health care; and accountability. Includes a sample consumer guide to selecting a health plan. For health care professionals and administrators. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

3 Stars from Doody
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780787940270
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 6/12/1998
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 166
  • Product dimensions: 0.63 (w) x 6.00 (h) x 9.00 (d)

Meet the Author

PAMELA P. HANES Ph.D., is an associate professor, Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine and associate director for research, Oregon Health Policy Institute, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland, Oregon. MERWYN R. GREENLICK Ph.D., is professor and chair of the Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, Oregon Health Sciences University. He is former director of the Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research and vice president for research, Kaiser Foundation Hospitals.

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Table of Contents

Foreward
Preface
1. Reporting Quality in a Market-driven Health Care System(Daniel M. Harris and Pamela P. Hanes)
2. Oregon Consortium: A Model in Scorecard Development(Pamela P. Hanes)
3. Consumer Preferences: Issues of Perception and Measurement(Pamela P. Hanes and Holly B. Jimison)
4. Consumers Want Choice and Voice(Michael J. Garland, Barry F. Anderson, and H. Diana Jones)
5. Tailoring Choice Information to Special Populations(Pamela P. Hanes)
6. Eliciting, Measuring, and Reporting Consumer Satisfaction(Christine Edlund)
7. Measuring Health Care Quality: The Process and Outcomes of Care(Bruce W. Goldberg)
8. The Alchemy of Accountability: Science and Art of Consumer Scorecards(Pamela P. Hanes and Merwyn R. Greenlick)
AppAndix A: A Consumer Guide to Selecting a Health PlanAppAndix B: A Request for Descriptive Navigational Information
Index

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