The Gradual Acceptance Of The Copernican Theory Of The Universe (1917) by Dorothy Stimson, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
The Gradual Acceptance of the Copernican Theory of the Universe

The Gradual Acceptance of the Copernican Theory of the Universe

by Dorothy Stimson
     
 

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This study does not belong in the field of astronomy, but in that of the history of thought; for it is an endeavor to trace the changes in people's beliefs and conceptions in regard to the universe as these were wrought by the dissolution of superstition resulting from the scientific and rationalist movements. The opening chapter is intended to do no more than to

Overview

This study does not belong in the field of astronomy, but in that of the history of thought; for it is an endeavor to trace the changes in people's beliefs and conceptions in regard to the universe as these were wrought by the dissolution of superstition resulting from the scientific and rationalist movements. The opening chapter is intended to do no more than to review briefly the astronomical theories up to the age of Copernicus, in order to provide a background for the better comprehension of the work of Copernicus and its effects.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781514769256
Publisher:
CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date:
06/30/2015
Pages:
130
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.28(d)

Read an Excerpt


PART TWO THE RECEPTION OF THE COPERNICAN THEORY. CHAPTER I. Opinions And Arguments In The Sixteenth Century. DURING the life-time of Copernicus, Roman Catholic churchmen had been interested in his work: Cardinal Schonberg wrote for full information, Widmanstadt reported on it to Pope Clement VII and Copernicus had dedicated his book to Pope Paul III.1 But after his death, the Church authorities apparently paid little heed to his theory until some fifty years later when Giordano Bruno forced it upon their ' attention in his philosophical teachings. Osiander's preface had probably blinded their eyes to its implications. The Protestant leaders were not quite so urbane in their attitude. While Copernicus was still alive, Luther is reported2 to have referred to this "new astrologer" who sought to prove that the earth and not the firmament swung around, saying: "The fool will overturn the whole science of astronomy. But as the / Holy Scriptures state, Joshua bade the sun stand still and not f the earth." Melancthon was more interested in this new idea, perhaps because of the influence of Rheticus, his colleague in the University of Wittenberg and Copernicus's great friend and supporter; but he too preferred not to dissent from the accepted opinion of the ages.3 Informally in a letter to a friend he 'See before, p. 30. "Luther: Tischreden; IV, 575; "Der Narr will die ganze Kunst Astron- omiae umkehren. Aber wie die heilige Schrift anzeigt, so heiss Josua die Sonne still stehen, und nicht das Erdreich." ""Non est autem hominis bene instituti dissentire a consensu tot sae- culorum." Praefatio Philippi Melanthonis, 1531, in Sacro-Busto: Libel- lus de Spfurra (no date). - --.-J implies the absurdity of the new teaching,1 and in his Initia Doctrina Physics; he go...

Meet the Author

"Dorothy Stimson (born 1890) was an American historian of science. She served as the president of the History of Science Society during 1953-1957. Her research interest included the reception of the Copernican theory. She also edited a collection of papers by George Sarton, considered to be the founder of the discipline of history of science." --Wikipedia

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