Grammar Snobs Are Great Big Meanies: A Guide to Language for Fun and Spite

Grammar Snobs Are Great Big Meanies: A Guide to Language for Fun and Spite

3.0 7
by June Casagrande
     
 

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What do suicidal pandas, doped-up rock stars, and a naked Pamela Anderson have in common? They’re all a heck of a lot more interesting than reading about predicate nominatives and hyphens. June Casagrande knows this and has invented a whole new twist on the grammar book. Grammar Snobs Are Great Big Meanies is a laugh-out-loud funny collection of anecdotes

Overview

What do suicidal pandas, doped-up rock stars, and a naked Pamela Anderson have in common? They’re all a heck of a lot more interesting than reading about predicate nominatives and hyphens. June Casagrande knows this and has invented a whole new twist on the grammar book. Grammar Snobs Are Great Big Meanies is a laugh-out-loud funny collection of anecdotes and essays on grammar and punctuation, as well as hilarious critiques of the self-appointed language experts.

Chapters include:

  • I’m Writing This While Naked—The Oh-So Steamy Predicate Nominative

  • Semicolonoscopy—Colons, Semicolons, Dashes, and Other Probing Annoyances

  • I’ll Take "I Feel Like a Moron" for $200, Alex—When to Put Punctuation Inside Quotation Marks

  • Snobbery Up with Which You Should Not Put Up—Prepositions

  • Is That a Dangler in Your Memo or Are You Just Glad to See Me?

  • Hyphens—Life-Sucking, Mom-and-Apple-Pie-Hating, Mime-Loving, Nerd-Fight-Inciting Daggers of the Damned

Casagrande delivers practical and fun language lessons not found anywhere else, demystifying the subject and taking it back from the snobs. In short, it’s a grammar book people will actually want to read—just for the fun of it.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Grammar snobs are lurking. They are ready to offer their services with anything but a gentle approach. Who really knows how to use the word whom? Most of us. It's just common sense. On the other hand, very few of us understand commas. This book includes short essays on topics such as prepositions, dangling modifiers, commas, colons, semicolons, and every grammar rule in-between. This lively book with humorous essays is a sure winner with adults; however, it is questionable for the teen reader set. In order to make the essays more appealing to for teens, more teen-friendly examples and language are needed. Librarians and teachers might want to look at a copy of this for their own shelves, but are better off to skip buying a book for the school or classroom library. 2006, Penguin, Ages 18 up.
—Mindy Hardwick

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780143036838
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
03/28/2006
Pages:
224
Sales rank:
541,728
Product dimensions:
5.14(w) x 7.13(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Meet the Author

June Casagrande writes the popular and very humorous "A Word, Please" grammar column for four Los Angeles Times community newspapers. She has written over 900 articles for various newspapers and magazines and has four years of improvisational comedy training.

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Grammar Snobs Are Great Big Meanies: A Guide to Language for Fun and Spite 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
For the post below me...You seem to have forgotten a comma.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is fun, accessible and, most importantly, unintimidating. As a recovering grammar snob, I find June Cassagrande's approach to a usually dry subject to be refreshing and informative. Perhaps we can be grammer gurus instead, sharing the joy of good grammar with smiles instead of smirks.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
My aunt gave me this book for my birthday, and at first I was excited to read it. I thought it looked interesting and fun. But as I started reading, I quickly thought that June Casagrande was a bit insulting, smug, and conceited in this book. I know I didn't laugh or find it funny while reading it. Chapter 25 was really annoying. For me, grammar doesn't really matter in song-writing. As for the other parts, well, I couldn't really understand anything (although I think it's because I'm not really into essay books or whatever it's called, as I'm just thirteen-years). And I think my sister got annoyed with me because I kept saying, "This author is so mean." Now I know that the saying "Don't judge a book by its cover" can be literal. Of course, there were also good things about the book She made a lot of sense. The book smelled good, the font was nice, and the texture of the cover was great. But those were the only nice things about it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Along with questionable explanations and one terribly misplaced comma (call me a meanie, but if you espouse it get it right), this book is the hypocritical approach to grammar: you're a meanie if you uphold good grammar, but I'm not a meanie if I write a book about it. Giving half-hearted explanations and then dismissing their importance a la 'just use your head!' is like trying to play both sides of the field. And as for calling grammar afficionados snobs and meanies? Well, there's the pot calling, as they say in Ireland. Lynn Truss started the grammar craze with 2 well written, well presented, witty books. This overdone atempt at humour (I can't count the number of times I groaned) and insult sinks like a stone. Still, I'll read the whole thing just so I can point out the gaping faults to people. I'm a meanie that way.