Grammar Snobs Are Great Big Meanies: A Guide to Language for Fun and Spite [NOOK Book]

Overview

What do suicidal pandas, doped-up rock stars, and a naked Pamela Anderson have in common? They’re all a heck of a lot more interesting than reading about predicate ...
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Grammar Snobs Are Great Big Meanies: A Guide to Language for Fun and Spite

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Overview

What do suicidal pandas, doped-up rock stars, and a naked Pamela Anderson have in common? They’re all a heck of a lot more interesting than reading about predicate nominatives and hyphens. June Casagrande knows this and has invented a whole new twist on the grammar book. Grammar Snobs Are Great Big Meanies is a laugh-out-loud funny collection of anecdotes and essays on grammar and punctuation, as well as hilarious critiques of the self-appointed language experts.



Chapters include:





I’m Writing This While Naked—The Oh-So Steamy Predicate Nominative




Semicolonoscopy—Colons, Semicolons, Dashes, and Other Probing Annoyances




I’ll Take "I Feel Like a Moron" for $200, Alex—When to Put Punctuation Inside Quotation Marks




Snobbery Up with Which You Should Not Put Up—Prepositions




Is That a Dangler in Your Memo or Are You Just Glad to See Me?




Hyphens—Life-Sucking, Mom-and-Apple-Pie-Hating, Mime-Loving, Nerd-Fight-Inciting Daggers of the Damned




Casagrande delivers practical and fun language lessons not found anywhere else, demystifying the subject and taking it back from the snobs. In short, it’s a grammar book people will actually want to read—just for the fun of it.



In this collection of hilarious anecdotes and essays on grammar and punctuation, Casagrande delivers practical language lessons not found anywhere else, demystifying the subject and taking it back from the snobs. Simultaneous paperback. Unabridged. 5 CDs.

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Grammar snobs are lurking. They are ready to offer their services with anything but a gentle approach. Who really knows how to use the word whom? Most of us. It's just common sense. On the other hand, very few of us understand commas. This book includes short essays on topics such as prepositions, dangling modifiers, commas, colons, semicolons, and every grammar rule in-between. This lively book with humorous essays is a sure winner with adults; however, it is questionable for the teen reader set. In order to make the essays more appealing to for teens, more teen-friendly examples and language are needed. Librarians and teachers might want to look at a copy of this for their own shelves, but are better off to skip buying a book for the school or classroom library. 2006, Penguin, Ages 18 up.
—Mindy Hardwick
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781101221389
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 3/28/2006
  • Sold by: Penguin Group
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 224
  • Sales rank: 1,222,746
  • File size: 237 KB

Meet the Author

June Casagrande writes the popular and very humorous "A Word, Please" grammar column for four Los Angeles Times community newspapers. She has written over 900 articles for various newspapers and magazines and has four years of improvisational comedy training.


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Table of Contents

Grammar Snobs Are Great Big Meanies Introduction: Grammar Snobs Make Good Prison Brides
1. A Snob For All Seasons—Shared Possessives
2. For Whom The Snob Trolls—"Who"/"Whom" and Why You're Right Not to Care
3. Passing The Simpsons Test— It's "Till," Not "Til"
4. To Boldly Blow—Only Windbags Fuss over Split Infinitives
5. The Sexy Mistake—"To Lay" versus "To Lie"
6. Snobbery Up With Which You Should Not Put—Prepositions
7. Is That A Dangler In Your Memo Or Are You Just Glad To See Me?
8. An Open Letter To Someone Who Knows I Once Tried To Be A Grammar Snob But Failed—"Dreamed" versus "Dreamt," "Preventive" versus "Preventative," and Similar Pairs
9. Anarchy Rules— "Adviser"/Advisor," "Titled"/"Entitled," and Other Ways to Be Right and Wrong at the Same Time
10. The Comma Denominator—Good News: No One Knows How to Use These Things
11. Semicolonoscopy—Colons, Semicolons, Dashes, Hyphens, and Other Probing Annoyances
12. The O.C.: Where The '80s Never Die—Lessons on the Apostrophe from Behind the Orange Curtain
13. Go Ahead, Make Up Your Own Words—Prefixes and Suffixes and Why the Dictionary Thinks You're Wrong
14. Hyphens: Life-Sucking, Mom-And-Apple-Pie-Hating, Mime-Loving, Nerd-Fight-Inciting Daggers Of The Damned
15. I'll Take "I Feel Like A Moron" For $200, Alex—When to Put Punctuation Inside Quotation Marks
16. A Chapter Dedicated To Those Other Delights Of Punctuation
17. Copulative Conjunctions: Hot Stuff For The Truly Desperate—Conjunctions to Know and Conjunctions That Blow
18. R U Uptite?—Shortcuts in the Digital Age and the Meanies Who Hate Them
19. Literally Schmiterally
20. How To Drop Out Of High School In The Ninth Grade And Still Make Big Bucks Telling People How To Use Good Grammar—"That" versus "Which"
21. Well, Well, Aren't You Good?—Adverbs Love Action
22. Fodder For Those Mothers—"Irregardless" and Other Slipups We Nonsnobs Can't Afford
23. I Wish I Were Batgirl—The Subjunctive Mood
24. Mommy's All Wrong, Daddy's All Wrong—The Truth about "Cans" and "Dones"
[25. The Kids Are All Wrong—"Alright," Dropping "The" Before "the The," Where to Put Your "Only," and Other Lessons from the World of Rock 'n' Roll
26. How To Impress Brad Pitt—"Affect" versus "Effect"
27. And You Too Can Begin Sentences With "And," "So," "But," And "Because"
28. Your Boss Is Not Jesus—Possessives and Words Ending in "S," "X," and "Z"
29. The Silence Of The Linguists—Double Possessives and Possessives with Gerunds
30. I'm Writing This While Naked—The Oh-So-Steamy Predicate Nominative
31. I Wish I May, I Wish I Might For Once In My Life Get This One Right—"May" versus "Might," "Different From" versus "Different Than," "Between" versus "Among," and Other Problematic Pairs
32. A Backyard Barbecue In The Back Yard, A Front-Yard Barbecue In The Front Yard—The Magical Moment When Two Words Become One
33. How To Never, Ever Offend Anyone With Inadvertently Sexist Or Racist Language
34. Complete Sentences? Optional!
35. It's/Its A Classroom Ditz—Or How I Learned to Stop Fuming and Love the Jerkwad
36. Eight, Nine, 10, 11—How to Write Numbers
37. If At First You Don't Irk A Snob, Try And Try Again—"Try To" versus "Try And"
38. Express Lane Of Pain—"Less Than" versus "Fewer Than"
39. Agree To Dis A Meanie—Subject-Verb Agreement, Conjugating Verbs for "None" and "Neither," and Other Agreement Issues
40. The Emperor's New Clause—Pronouns That Are Objects and Subjects, "Each Other" versus "One Another," and More Evidence That the "Experts" Aren't All They're Cracked Up to Be
41. Satan's Vocabulary
42. You Really Can Look It Up Acknowledgments Sources

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3
( 7 )
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(1)

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 8 of 7 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 16, 2012

    My aunt gave me this book for my birthday, and at first I was ex

    My aunt gave me this book for my birthday, and at first I was excited to read it. I thought it looked interesting and fun. But as I started reading, I quickly thought that June Casagrande was a bit insulting, smug, and conceited in this book. I know I didn't laugh or find it funny while reading it. Chapter 25 was really annoying. For me, grammar doesn't really matter in song-writing. As for the other parts, well, I couldn't really understand anything (although I think it's because I'm not really into essay books or whatever it's called, as I'm just thirteen-years). And I think my sister got annoyed with me because I kept saying, "This author is so mean." Now I know that the saying "Don't judge a book by its cover" can be literal. Of course, there were also good things about the book She made a lot of sense. The book smelled good, the font was nice, and the texture of the cover was great. But those were the only nice things about it.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 24, 2008

    Sticklers beware!

    This book is fun, accessible and, most importantly, unintimidating. As a recovering grammar snob, I find June Cassagrande's approach to a usually dry subject to be refreshing and informative. Perhaps we can be grammer gurus instead, sharing the joy of good grammar with smiles instead of smirks.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 22, 2012

    Hmm

    For the post below me...You seem to have forgotten a comma.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 14, 2007

    Who's the grammar snob now?

    Along with questionable explanations and one terribly misplaced comma (call me a meanie, but if you espouse it get it right), this book is the hypocritical approach to grammar: you're a meanie if you uphold good grammar, but I'm not a meanie if I write a book about it. Giving half-hearted explanations and then dismissing their importance a la 'just use your head!' is like trying to play both sides of the field. And as for calling grammar afficionados snobs and meanies? Well, there's the pot calling, as they say in Ireland. Lynn Truss started the grammar craze with 2 well written, well presented, witty books. This overdone atempt at humour (I can't count the number of times I groaned) and insult sinks like a stone. Still, I'll read the whole thing just so I can point out the gaping faults to people. I'm a meanie that way.

    0 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 16, 2010

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 28, 2009

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 8 of 7 Customer Reviews

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