Grand Animals

Grand Animals

by Robbers on High Street
     
 

While New York's Robbers on High Street gained a lot of comparisons to the Strokes and Franz Ferdinand after the release of their first full-length, Tree City, it is Spoon that they turn to for their sophomore album. Not that hints of this didn't exist before, but it'sSee more details below

Overview

While New York's Robbers on High Street gained a lot of comparisons to the Strokes and Franz Ferdinand after the release of their first full-length, Tree City, it is Spoon that they turn to for their sophomore album. Not that hints of this didn't exist before, but it's amplified even more greatly here, and most of the tracks on Grand Animals sound as if they were borrowed directly from the Austin band's discarded sketches. Because while lead singer Benjamin Trokan has a voice and delivery style very reminiscent of Spoon's frontman, his words aren't quite up to par with those of Britt Daniel, who's able to tell intimate, interesting stories without sounding clichéd or forced. Not that Trokan's lyrics are bad, but they don't compare to Daniel's in the slightest, either trying too hard to be like him ("The Fatalist" and "Crown Victory" both sound like they were written after spending a lot of time with Gimme Fiction), or just plain mediocre ("The Ramp," "You Don't Stand a Chance"). Perhaps if they were put more often to compositions that weren't ripped directly from the Spoon songbook the lyrics wouldn't come across as weak (and the times where the band does take an alternate musical route, like in "Guard at Your Heel" and "Your Phantom Walks the Rail," they work well), but because of their musical choices, Robbers on High Street make that comparison inevitable, and therefore they must also face the consequences of having shown themselves so unmistakably as a lesser band. Yes, there are horns, yes there are string-sounding keyboards and plenty of falsetto (resembling Spacehog's frontman Royston Langdon, strangely enough) to try to set them apart, and it all sounds fine, but it's not more than bits and pieces of other people's work reassembled into something vaguely new, and at this point in their career, Robbers on High Street need to better attempt settling into a style of their own.

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Product Details

Release Date:
07/24/2007
Label:
Watertower Music
UPC:
0794043908521
catalogNumber:
39085

Related Subjects

Tracks

  1. Across Your Knee  -  Robbers on High Street
  2. The Fatalist  -  Robbers on High Street
  3. Crown Victoria  -  Robbers on High Street
  4. The Ramp  -  Robbers on High Street
  5. Kick 'Em in the Shins  -  Robbers on High Street
  6. Nasty Numbers  -  Robbers on High Street
  7. Married Young  -  Robbers on High Street
  8. Your Phantom Walks the Hall  -  Robbers on High Street
  9. You Don't Stand a Chance  -  Robbers on High Street
  10. Guard at Your Heel  -  Robbers on High Street
  11. Keys to the Century  -  Robbers on High Street

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Album Credits

Performance Credits

Robbers on High Street   Primary Artist
Done Piper   Mandolin
Morgan King   Bass,Trombone,Tuba,Bass Guitar,French Horn
Seth McLain   Hand Clapping
Benjamin Trokan   Percussion,Drums,Keyboards,Vocals
Steven Mercado   Guitar,Alto Saxophone,Baritone Saxophone
Daniele Luppi   Clavinet,Bells,Tubular Bells,Optigan,Hammond Synth
Matt Trowbridge   Wurlitzer
Tracy Eisenberg   Background Vocals
Emma F. Smith   Background Vocals
Olivia S. Dhaliwal   Background Vocals

Technical Credits

Joe Gastwirt   Mastering
Done Piper   Engineer
Morgan King   Composer
Seth McLain   Engineer
Benjamin Trokan   Composer,Contributor
Britt Myers   Engineer
Steven Mercado   Composer
Anton Riehl   Programming
Daniele Luppi   Producer,Audio Production
Tim McCarthy   Contributor

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