The Grand Inquisitor

The Grand Inquisitor

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by Fyodor Dostoevsky
     
 

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The Grand Inquisitor is a parable told by Ivan to Alyosha in Fyodor Dostoevsky's novel, The Brothers Karamazov (1879-1880). Ivan and Alyosha are brothers; Ivan questions the possibility of a personal, benevolent God and Alyosha is a novice monk.

The Grand Inquisitor is an important part of the novel and one of the best-known passages in modern literature…  See more details below

Overview

The Grand Inquisitor is a parable told by Ivan to Alyosha in Fyodor Dostoevsky's novel, The Brothers Karamazov (1879-1880). Ivan and Alyosha are brothers; Ivan questions the possibility of a personal, benevolent God and Alyosha is a novice monk.

The Grand Inquisitor is an important part of the novel and one of the best-known passages in modern literature because of its ideas about human nature and freedom, and because of its fundamental ambiguity.

The tale is told by Ivan with brief interruptive questions by Alyosha. In the tale, Jesus comes back to earth in Seville at the time of the Inquisition. The people recognize him and adore him, but he is arrested by Inquisition leaders and sentenced to be burnt to death the next day. The Grand Inquisitor visits him in his cell to tell him that the Church no longer needs him. The main portion of the text is the Inquisitor explaining to Jesus why his return would interfere with the mission of the church.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940013239562
Publisher:
Seven Treasures Publications
Publication date:
10/30/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
65 KB

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The Grand Inquisitor: with related chapters from The Brothers Karamazov 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
For an in depth understanding of the temptations of Christ you can do no better than Anne Freemantle's introduction to 'the Grand Inquisitor.' In plucking this chapter from 'The Brothers ....', Freemantle goes straight to the heart of Christianity and the freedom offered to man by God. What an extraordinary and inciteful booklet.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I was perusing the shelves of Barnes & Noble this evening and carelessly picked up this book (or a poem in prose as Dostoevsky describes it). I was immediately and intensely moved by its poignancy of topic, depth of thought, unabashed critique of the Church, and scathingly, yet eerily logical, depiction of the depravity of human nature. I have never before written a review and only do so now because I believe that such an incredibly striking text should be read by all who have never before been rendered speechless (as I have not before now) by a book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is VERY hard to follow. Don't expect to get through this in one sitting. It takes at least 2 reads to understand the implications of what is being said, but if you can understand the meaning of it, then you are in for a Grand Enlightenment.