BN.com Gift Guide

Grandfather's Microscope

Overview

About the Author

Mei Liu was born in 1929 in Hunan, China. She fled to Taiwan in 1949, graduated from Taiwan University Medical School and immigrated to America in 1953. She served on the faculties of the University of Chicago, Northwestern University and Brown University. In 1989, she returned to Asia and taught at Cheng Kung University in Taiwan and Hunan University in China. She retired in 1997 and now lives in Honolulu.

...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (1) from $56.96   
  • Used (1) from $56.96   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$56.96
Seller since 2007

Feedback rating:

(265)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

Very Good
Hardcover. Book Condition: Very Good. Jacket Condition: Near Fine. Nice Firm Clean copy ! Light general wear. 256 pages. Size: 8.88 x 5.9 x .92.

Ships from: Weymouth, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

About the Author

Mei Liu was born in 1929 in Hunan, China. She fled to Taiwan in 1949, graduated from Taiwan University Medical School and immigrated to America in 1953. She served on the faculties of the University of Chicago, Northwestern University and Brown University. In 1989, she returned to Asia and taught at Cheng Kung University in Taiwan and Hunan University in China. She retired in 1997 and now lives in Honolulu.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781401078300
  • Publisher: Xlibris Corporation
  • Publication date: 2/28/2003
  • Pages: 254
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.88 (h) x 0.92 (d)

Read an Excerpt

It was a warm summer day, and I was playing with elder sister Lan in the garden. A black monarch butterfly with yellow spots on its wings was flitting among the blossoms. I followed it around until it landed on a flower petal. I was about to pinch its wings between my fingers when the old housekeeper, Lin Ma, appeared on the veranda. “Come inside, little sisters!” she called out.

 

I pretended not to hear. I was too busy searching for the butterfly, which had just flown away. Lin Ma was determined to get us into the house. From the veranda, she shuffled down the stone steps on her little bound feet, grasping the railing for support. When she finally reached us in the garden, she was out of breath.

 

“Come in quickly! Your Ma is calling you!” I looked at Lin Ma’s face, which now loomed above my own. Her eyes were wild, not at all like her usual self, and her voice made us obey. Quietly we followed her to our mother’s room.

 

Ma was lying in bed, and Nai Nai, my maternal grandmother, was sitting in a chair by her side. Dad was standing at the foot of the bed. We were led to the bedside opposite Nai Nai and I looked at Ma.

 

Ma was not seeing. Her eyes were closed. She waved her arms in the air and cried out:

“Help me! Somebody come help me! Save my life!” I thought she was trying to tease us, one of those make-believe plays.

 

“Lan! Lan! Save me! Save me!” Ma cried out. I looked at Lan for any clue of what was happening.

 

Nai Nai turned her tear-stricken face to Lan and said:”Answer your Ma! Say you are here! Say Ma, come back!”

 

Lan drew a deep breath and burst into tears. When she had gathered enough wind, she said in a small, trembling voice “Ma.... Come back....Ma!”

 

I felt a sudden panic to see Lan cry. She was the leader of our clan, the one who was never afraid of anything. By then I realized Ma was not playing, and something was terribly wrong. I don’t remember myself crying. I was thinking,”why doesn’t she call my name? I could save her although I am not yet seven and Lan is eight.”

 

By her bedside, Dad stood rigid, silent and stone-faced. I couldn’t tell if he knew what was going on, but I knew his stomach was tied into a big knot, just like mine.

The next day, Ma was thrashing about in bed, moaning and muttering incomprehensible words. Two Taoist priests were summoned to the house. I peeked through a crack in the door to watch the strange goings-on. The priests were dressed in tall pointed caps and long flowing black gowns. In the hallway, they set up a large square table on which they placed gilded statues of gods, incense burners and candlesticks. For days, the priests burned incense and paper money and chanted incantations to invoke the spirits of heaven and earth. They prostrated themselves before the gods, and went into a trance. After lengthy communication with the world beyond, the priests came up with this insight.

 

On the fifth day of the fifth lunar month, the day of the Dragon Boat Festival, our family had gone on an outing aboard a houseboat moored along the banks of the Yangtze River. We watched the dragon boat race and had tea and zengzi, packets of sweet rice wrapped in bamboo leaves. It was an evil boat, the priests said, and a vicious murder had been committed there. As Ma walked on the deck, she had stepped on a dried bloodstain from the murdered man. That’s how the ghost had attached itself to her body.

 

Lin Ma told me the world is full of ghosts of people who have died a violent death. These malicious ghosts are forever wandering in the wild, looking for substitutes. They like to haunt people whose qi is weakened by illness or sadness. The ghosts would go so far as to set traps to lure people to their deaths. Only when the ghost comes up with a substitute would the local earth god allow it to get on the Wheel of Incarnation so that it could be reborn again.

 

The night before Ma took sick, she went missing from her bed. When Dad and the servants went looking for her, they found her sitting under the moonlight by a well at the back of our house. The wooden cover of the well had been pushed aside. When they brought her back home, she had become incoherent and delirious.  

 

I never for a moment questioned the adults’ explanation of my mother’s bizarre behavior. What would draw her to that well, the one which we had always been warned to stay away from, to perch on the edge so close to death? Why would she, a happy, loving mother, suddenly lose her mind? From my child’s perspective, an angry ghost made as much sense as anything else did. The episode was so frightening, and so incomprehensible, it must have been a product of the supernatural. Nothing in our human world, I thought, could cause such anguish and pain.

 

The priests wasted no time getting on with the exorcism. They burned candles and incense and spent long hours chanting to the gods for intervention and help. They brandished their swords and performed kung fu to tame the ghost. They bribed the ghost with stacks of paper money and paper gold nuggets, which were placed in large sacks and burned. A miniature horse and carriage, constructed of colorful paper plastered over a willow frame, was set alight to allow the ghost to travel to the Wheel in comfort and style.  

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Prologue

Chapter 1:    Dragon Boat Ghost

Chapter 2:    Three-Inch Golden Lily

Chapter 3:    Golden Rice Bowl

Chapter 4:    Hunan, My Ancestral Home

Chapter 5:    Song Girl's Ignorance

Chapter 6:    The Struggle

Chapter 7:    Under the Peach Blossoms

Chapter 8:    Exodus

Chapter 9:    My ABC Daughter

Chapter 10:  Becoming a Neuropathologist

Chapter 11:  Kung Fu, Grasshoppers and Ramon y Cajal

Chapter 12:  Feng Shui

Chapter 13:  The Yale Dream

Chapter 14:  The East Wind

Chapter 15:  The Women Warriors

Chapter 16:  The Martyr

Chapter 17:  Yuan, the Spiritual Link

Chapter 18:  Soul Bridge

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)