Grandmothers Garden

Grandmothers Garden

by John Archambault, Raul Colon, David Plummer
     
 

In this beautiful story-poem, master storyteller John Archambault celebrates the magnificence and commonality of life in all its rich diversity. Using the image of the Earth as a garden turning around the sun, the book affirms that with a bit of sunshine, rain and lots of love, there is room for everyone to bloom. Full color.See more details below

Overview

In this beautiful story-poem, master storyteller John Archambault celebrates the magnificence and commonality of life in all its rich diversity. Using the image of the Earth as a garden turning around the sun, the book affirms that with a bit of sunshine, rain and lots of love, there is room for everyone to bloom. Full color.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Leila Toledo
Although the roses, carnations and chrysanthemums in Grandma's garden are different in color, size and shape, their beauty flows forth. Likewise, everyone blossoms when showered with a little sunshine, rain and love in Grandma's garden. A beautiful story-poem depicting the world's diversity.
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
K-Gr 2-In this didactic story told in verse, people are likened to flowers in Grandmother's garden. "Different colors, different faces...reaching for the sun." The imagery is confusing: "Earth is a garden" leads one to see Grandmother as a personification of God, but later she is identified as Grandma Rose, the relative of the narrator. There is a recurring awkward line: "Till your fingers through the soil `til the time stands still." After the "til(l)s" are sorted out, what does this mean? And how does it contribute to the theme of blooming diversity? The stippled illustrations show sweet, dreamy faces of children from many lands tending oversized blossoms against a blurry green background. The vague and wispy religiosity of this book contains ingredients of multiculturalism, but they are mixed together in such an odd way that many children may be uncomfortably confused.-Carolyn Jenks, First Parish Unitarian Church, Portland, ME
Kirkus Reviews
Grandmother's Garden ( PLB book & cassette Aug. 1996; 32 pp.; 0-382-39653-7; PLB 0-382-39652-9; book & cassette 0-382-39664-2): In an extended poetic metaphor, Archambault (The Birth of the Whale, p. 222, etc.) compares the earth to Grandmother Rose's garden, where all flowers grow together. "Different colors, different faces, different names/Underneath our skin, we are all the same./We are flowering faces reaching for the sun./In Grandmother's garden, we are all one./In Grandmother's garden, we are all one." These words seem to belong to a song, and here are sunnily set to Colón's illustrations, created in his now-trademark style. Soft-hued, rainbow-colored scenes have been given a texture like scratched-out fingerprints. Sculpted, ethnically diverse boys and girls are pictured working in a flower garden, bathed in sunlight. A warm, optimistic work.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780382396526
Publisher:
Silver Burdett Press
Publication date:
08/01/1996
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.76(w) x 11.25(h) x 0.36(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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