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Grandparents Wisconsin Style: Places to Go and Wisdom to Share
     

Grandparents Wisconsin Style: Places to Go and Wisdom to Share

by Mike Link, Kate Crowley
 

Take an active role in your grandchildren's lives. Show them the best of Wisconsin. Teach the valuable lessons you've learned throughout your years. Grandparents Wisconsin Style is filled with insights and advice to help you along the way. The guidebook features more than 70 Wisconsin attractions and activities, with tips on making each stop a bonding experience.

Overview

Take an active role in your grandchildren's lives. Show them the best of Wisconsin. Teach the valuable lessons you've learned throughout your years. Grandparents Wisconsin Style is filled with insights and advice to help you along the way. The guidebook features more than 70 Wisconsin attractions and activities, with tips on making each stop a bonding experience. If you're a grandparent who wants to play an instrumental part in your grandchildren's healthy development, this book is for you!

Editorial Reviews

Wisconsin Natural Resources - Kathryn A Kahler
As fate would have it, another book crossed our desk that deserves mention here.

Grandparents, Wisconsin Style, by Mike Link and Kate Crowley (Adventure Publications, 159 pages, $14.95) is an excellent guide grandparents can use to "get out, get going, take those grandchildren and experience the world again for the first time through heir smiles, their curiosity, their wonder and their energy." You'll find 74 Wisconsin destinations - some natural, others manmade. Each has a two-page description including suggested opportunities for "bonding and bridging" that each destination offers, the best season for a visit, contact information, and "a word to the wise" to help prepare for the trip or avoid disappointments. Each entry also comes witha recommendation for how old your grandchild should be to get the maximum benefit from the trip.

The authors are a husband and wife team who speak from experience, with four young grandchildren of their own. They challenge grandparents to pass on their wealth of life experiences, just as elders across the generations have passed on traditions of their own. The simplest of experiences - like baking cookies or flying a kite - will be the ones your grandchildren will treasure most. Season them with field trips to pick cherries in Door County, ride a train through the Baraboo Hills, or experience the thrill of a dog sled race, and your grandchildren will have their own wealth of memories to pass on someday.

Wisconsin State Journal - William R. Wineke
Grandparents' travel guide

OK, this might be a little cheesy. But if you want to give a subtle hint to your parents about how they could take the grandkids off your hands for a few hours or a couple of days, "Grandparents Wisconsin Style: Places to Go & Wisdom to Share" by Mike Link and Kate Crowley (Adventure Publications: $14.95), might make a good Christmas gift.

The authors are married and their connection to Wisconsin is that Link spent childhood summers at his grandparents home in Rice Lake. The two now live in Minnesota. The book is a travel book of fun places in Wisconsin to take one's grandchildren.

Included are Lambeau Field and the Packers Hall of Fame - but the authors also suggest the International Clown Hall of Fame in West Allis, the National Fresh Water Fishing Hall of Fame and Museum in Hayward and the Wisconsin Conservation Hall of Fame in Stevens Point.

"Ask your grandchildren to tell you what a hero is," they write. "The halls of fame are filled with athletic prowess, but see if you can find the stories about the athletes who rose above the sport and helped the community. Find the qualities in sports that are important to everyone, in every line of work - intelligence, dedication, practice, knowledge, teamwork. Then emphasize these qualities as you enjoy thinking about the Packer champions and championships."
They also recommend Old World Wisconsin, the State Capitol in Madison and the Mid-Continent Railway Museum in North Freedom.

Each entry suggests the optimum age for the grandchild, includes addresses, telephone numbers and "words to the wise" about how to make the trip enjoyable.

To be honest, there's nothing about this guidebook to really set it apart from the others on the market - except that it is aimed at grandparents and, thus, makes a handy and inexpensive gift to wrap for the old folks.
-William R. Wineke A

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781591931706
Publisher:
Adventure Publications, Incorporated
Publication date:
08/28/2007
Pages:
176
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x (d)

Meet the Author

Since marrying and moving to the country twenty-two years ago, Mary Crowley has been surrounded by forests, prairies, birds, dogs, cats, horses and lots of other wild creatures. When husband, Mike, built her Lady Slipper Cottage in the woods, her dream expanded, but it wasn’t complete until she became a grandmother. Kate has been a naturalist, an educator, and a writer for 30 years, first at the Minnesota Zoo and then the Audubon Center of the North Woods. She has co-authored 12 books with Mike and writes for magazines and a monthly nature newspaper column. Kate enjoys hiking, biking, skiing, scrapbooking, reading and spending as much time as possible with her grandchildren. She cares deeply about preserving the natural world.

Mike Link is the author of 22 books and numerous magazine articles. He and his wife, Kate, live in Willow River, Minnesota, where they enjoy helping their grandchildren discover the world of nature and play. The bird feeders are always full and the forest has wonderful trails. For 37 years Mike directed the Audubon Center and now, entering retirement, he looks forward to writing, teaching for both Northland College and Hamline University, and of course spending time with the grandchildren. As his books attest, traveling is another passion. With fifty states and twenty countries covering his travels, paddles, hikes, and explorations, he feels that he owes a debt to the earth. Whether we call it Mother Nature, Gaia or Creation, the earth is our source of air, water and sustenance, and its destruction is a crime.

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