Grandpa's Corner Store

( 1 )

Overview

When a giant new supermarket moves into the neighborhood, Lucy's grandpa plans to sell his store. But with the help of friends and neighbors, Lucy is determined to keep this from happening. In another of her loving and lively portraits of community caring, DyAnne DiSalvo-Ryan tells the timely story of what can happen when the whole neighborhood gets involved.

"2001 Notable Children's Trade Books in the Field of Social Studies (NCSS/CBC)"

Grandfather's corner grocery...

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Overview

When a giant new supermarket moves into the neighborhood, Lucy's grandpa plans to sell his store. But with the help of friends and neighbors, Lucy is determined to keep this from happening. In another of her loving and lively portraits of community caring, DyAnne DiSalvo-Ryan tells the timely story of what can happen when the whole neighborhood gets involved.

"2001 Notable Children's Trade Books in the Field of Social Studies (NCSS/CBC)"

Grandfather's corner grocery business is threatened by a new supermarket, but his granddaughter, Lucy, organizes the neighbors to convince him to stay.

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Children's Literature
In this age of super stores and conspicuous consumption, comes this gentle reminder that sometimes small and simple is the best. Grandpa's store sits at a busy corner of a large city. He has a steady stream of customers--children who pile in for candy, the firefighters who frequent the deli, Mr. Tutti who only buys yesterday's paper, and Mr. Lee who phones in his orders. Grandpa's granddaughter helps by sweeping the floor and stocking the shelves. Moving into the community is a giant supermarket with a grand opening planned. When the little girl sees the For Sale sign and hears Grandpa's fear that he will lose his customers, she swings into action. Having learned in school that a community is a "group of people who live and work together," she calls on his customers to rally in support. Grandpa's store may not be as big as the supermarket but it still has everything you need. Soft watercolor illustrations give life to the loving text that aptly illustrates what can happen when neighbors work together. A map of the community on the endpapers adds to the warm, homey tone of the story. 2000, HarperCollins, Ages 6 to 9, $15.95. Reviewer: Beverley Fahey
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3-Lucy's grandfather owns the local grocery store, and the child is worried that he will be forced to sell and move away from her once a new supermarket opens. Filled with love and determination, she is able to pull the neighborhood together and save her Grandpa's store. DiSalvo-Ryan illustrates how anger at a situation can be turned into something positive and emphasizes the importance of community in our lives. Children will empathize with Lucy and realize that they are not always powerless, that they can make a difference. The soft, colorful illustrations are large, often taking up almost the entire two-page spread. The faces of the people reflect the feelings described in the text. The map on the end pages is an added bonus, paving the way for similar classroom projects. This title would fit well into a social studies lesson on communities.-Sheilah Kosco, Rapides Parish Library, Alexandria, LA Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.|
Kirkus Reviews
The author/illustrator of City Green (1994) and Uncle Willie and the Soup Kitchen (1991) again celebrates community spirit, this time with a tale of a takecharge child who refuses to let her grandpa's corner grocery quietly disappear when a big supermarket opens down the street. Having already seen the neighborhood hardware store closed by competition, Lucy indignantly rejects the idea that her grandpa would likewise knuckle under; so she is understandably dismayed when a "For Sale" sign goes up. " ‘The new supermarket will have everything from soup to nuts,' " Grandpa explains sadly. " ‘But it won't have you,' " she rejoins—then marches off to organize the willing regulars, from her own classmates to the firefighters across the street, into a fixit brigade. From plump resident tabby cat to worn checkerboard floor tiles, Grandpa's store positively exudes coziness, and in the final scenes DiSalvoRyan's industrious, multigenerational crowd is lit up as much by Grandpa's loving smile as by his bright red smock. (Picture book. 79)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780688167165
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 4/28/2000
  • Edition description: 1 ED
  • Pages: 40
  • Sales rank: 419,933
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Lexile: AD380L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 10.00 (w) x 10.00 (h) x 0.25 (d)

Meet the Author

DyAnne DiSalvo-Ryan's books include Grandpa's Corner Store, A Castle on Viola Street, City Green and Uncle Willie and the Soup Kitchen. She lives in Philadelphia. In Her Own Words...

"When I was a girl growing up in Brooklyn, New York, the oldest sibling of one brother and two sisters, I never thought that my art was among the very best. My mother and father recognized my art ability early on. It was because of their sensitivity that I eventually began to acknowledge my talent and enjoy my life as an artist. I remember when I was eight years old, looking at a book one day and thinking: I can make a better book. It was from that day on that I knew I wanted to be an artist and author of children's books. Consequently, whenever anyone asked me if wanted to be an artist When I grew up, I answered, "I am all artist already."

"I always loved a sharp pencil and a new piece of paper. As a young girl, I drew all the time. Even as a teenager, I stayed in my room and drew for hours. My favorite books as a child were the Madeline series, anything by Dr. Seuss, The Five Chinese Brothers, and A Big Ball of String.

"After attending college a[ the School of Visual Arts in New York, I moved to Kansas City, Missouri" in 1978 to work with Hallmark cards. While living in Kansas City, I set tip interviews with New York publishers whenever I went back home. My first book was Published by Western Publishing in 1980. Since then, That New Baby has sold over one million copies. It is even printed in Indonesian!

"Before I begin a book I can see the whole thing. I can sense tile color and pacing. Depending on the type of manuscript I am working with, sometimes I take a lot of photographs, sometimes I need to do historical research, sometimes I draw from my head. Usually, it is very easy for me to draw. If I find myself erasing too much, I will start all over and try to envision the picture in a new way.

My characters are based on people I know or people I have seen. I want children to be able to see themselves or their neighbors when they look at my illustrations. I want them to feel familiar. Many of my personal experiences become the source of inspiration for my stories. The story of Uncle Willie and the Soup Kitchen was born from the three years I spent working at a soup kitchen while I lived in Park Slope, Brooklyn. City Green was inspired by the garden lot that I passed on my way there. Inspiration for Grandpa’s Corner Store comes from a local grocer with many loyal customers (including me) in Haddon Heights, New Jersey. Before writing, A Castle on Viola Street, I worked for several months building and renovating houses in Camden, New Jersey, through a nonprofit group like Habitat for Humanity. I donate a percentage of my royalties from each book to the organization that they support. This is my way of contributing back to the communities and purposes my books provide.

Currently, I live in a historical town just outside Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. I like living in a small town. It is quiet and easy to think. But the moment I cross the Verranzano Bridge into Brooklyn, I am enchanted by the man sweeping outside the little bodega. I am charmed by three women talking on a street corner, holding the red-and-white strings of their bakery boxes. There are teenagers in curlers and kids scooping puddle water with spoons. From fire escapes to gum spots I see life in the buildings and movement on the sidewalks. I take out my sharp pencil and a clean piece of paper. I am an artist already."

DyAnne DiSalvo-Ryan's books include Grandpa's Corner Store, A Castle on Viola Street, City Green and Uncle Willie and the Soup Kitchen. She lives in Philadelphia. In Her Own Words...

"When I was a girl growing up in Brooklyn, New York, the oldest sibling of one brother and two sisters, I never thought that my art was among the very best. My mother and father recognized my art ability early on. It was because of their sensitivity that I eventually began to acknowledge my talent and enjoy my life as an artist. I remember when I was eight years old, looking at a book one day and thinking: I can make a better book. It was from that day on that I knew I wanted to be an artist and author of children's books. Consequently, whenever anyone asked me if wanted to be an artist When I grew up, I answered, "I am all artist already."

"I always loved a sharp pencil and a new piece of paper. As a young girl, I drew all the time. Even as a teenager, I stayed in my room and drew for hours. My favorite books as a child were the Madeline series, anything by Dr. Seuss, The Five Chinese Brothers, and A Big Ball of String.

"After attending college a[ the School of Visual Arts in New York, I moved to Kansas City, Missouri" in 1978 to work with Hallmark cards. While living in Kansas City, I set tip interviews with New York publishers whenever I went back home. My first book was Published by Western Publishing in 1980. Since then, That New Baby has sold over one million copies. It is even printed in Indonesian!

"Before I begin a book I can see the whole thing. I can sense tile color and pacing. Depending on the type of manuscript I am working with, sometimes I take a lot of photographs, sometimes I need to do historical research, sometimes I draw from my head. Usually, it is very easy for me to draw. If I find myself erasing too much, I will start all over and try to envision the picture in a new way.

My characters are based on people I know or people I have seen. I want children to be able to see themselves or their neighbors when they look at my illustrations. I want them to feel familiar. Many of my personal experiences become the source of inspiration for my stories. The story of Uncle Willie and the Soup Kitchen was born from the three years I spent working at a soup kitchen while I lived in Park Slope, Brooklyn. City Green was inspired by the garden lot that I passed on my way there. Inspiration for Grandpa’s Corner Store comes from a local grocer with many loyal customers (including me) in Haddon Heights, New Jersey. Before writing, A Castle on Viola Street, I worked for several months building and renovating houses in Camden, New Jersey, through a nonprofit group like Habitat for Humanity. I donate a percentage of my royalties from each book to the organization that they support. This is my way of contributing back to the communities and purposes my books provide.

Currently, I live in a historical town just outside Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. I like living in a small town. It is quiet and easy to think. But the moment I cross the Verranzano Bridge into Brooklyn, I am enchanted by the man sweeping outside the little bodega. I am charmed by three women talking on a street corner, holding the red-and-white strings of their bakery boxes. There are teenagers in curlers and kids scooping puddle water with spoons. From fire escapes to gum spots I see life in the buildings and movement on the sidewalks. I take out my sharp pencil and a clean piece of paper. I am an artist already."

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 1, 2000

    A heartwarming story!

    This is a nice story, well-written and beautifully illustrated.

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