Grant's Lieutenants: From Chattanooga to Appomattox

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Overview

A companion to Grant's Lieutenants: From Cairo to Vicksburg, this new volume assesses Union generalship during the final two years of the Civil War. Steven Woodworth, one of the war's premier historians, is joined by a team of distinguished scholars—Mark Grimsley, John Marszalek, and Earl Hess, among others—who critique Ulysses S. Grant's commanders in terms of both their working relationship with their general-in-chief and their actual performances.

The book covers well-known Union field generals like William T. Sherman, George Thomas, George Meade, and Philip Sheridan, as well as the less-prominent Franz Sigel, Horatio Wright, Edward Ord, and Benjamin Butler. In addition, it includes an iconoclastic look at Grant's former superior and wartime chief of staff Henry W. Halleck, focusing on his wise counsel concerning Washington politics, the qualities of various subordinates, and the strategic environment. Each of these probing essays emphasizes the character and accomplishments of a particular general and shows how his relationship with Grant either helped or hindered the Union cause. The contributors highlight the ways Grant's lieutenants contributed to or challenged their commander's own success and development as a general. In addition to revisiting Grant's key collaboration with Sherman, the essays illuminate the hostile relationship between Grant and Thomas, commander of the Army of the Cumberland; Grant's almost daily contact with "Old Snapping Turtle" Meade, whose expertise relieved Grant of the close tactical direction of the Army of the Potomac; and the development of a highly successful command partnership between Grant and Sheridan, his new commander ofthe Army of the Shenandoah. Readers will also learn how Grant handled the relative incompetence of his less sterling leaders—perhaps failing to give Butler adequate direction and overlooking Ord's suspect political views in light of their long relationship.

Like its companion volume, Grant's Lieutenants: From Chattanooga to Appomattox is an essential touchstone for Civil War scholars and aficionados. It offers new and profound insights into the command relationships that fundamentally shaped both the conduct of the war and its final outcome.

This book is part of the Modern War Studies series.

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What People Are Saying

Brooks D. Simpson
These stimulating and insightful essays remind us of the collaborative nature of military command and help us appreciate how Grant persevered and ultimately prevailed in directing the Union armies to victory. (Brooks D. Simpson, author of Ulysses S. Grant: Triumph over Adversity, 1822-1865)
Gary W. Gallagher
A companion to Woodworth's earlier collection of essays on top Union commanders that matches the high quality of the original. . . . Offers incisive analysis of the men Grant entrusted with execution of his strategic plans. Scholars and general readers will find much to ponder in this fine book. (Gary W. Gallagher, author of The Confederate War)
Stephen D. Engle
A fascinating and thought-provoking book. (Stephen D. Engle, author of Struggle for the Heartland: The Campaigns from Fort Henry to Corinth)
Brooks D. Simpson

These stimulating and insightful essays remind us of the collaborative nature of military command and help us appreciate how Grant persevered and ultimately prevailed in directing the Union armies to victory. (Brooks D. Simpson, author of Ulysses S. Grant: Triumph over Adversity, 1822-1865)

Gary W. Gallagher

A companion to Woodworth's earlier collection of essays on top Union commanders that matches the high quality of the original. . . . Offers incisive analysis of the men Grant entrusted with execution of his strategic plans. Scholars and general readers will find much to ponder in this fine book. (Gary W. Gallagher, author of The Confederate War)

Stephen D. Engle

A fascinating and thought-provoking book. (Stephen D. Engle, author of Struggle for the Heartland: The Campaigns from Fort Henry to Corinth)

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780700615896
  • Publisher: University Press of Kansas
  • Publication date: 5/29/2008
  • Series: Modern War Studies
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 256
  • Product dimensions: 6.20 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Steven E. Woodworth is professor of history at Texas Christian University. He is the author and editor of more than a dozen books, including Nothing but Victory: The Army of the Tennessee, 1861-1865.

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Table of Contents

"Take the Seat of Honor": William T. Sherman John F. Marszalek Marszalek, John F. 5

"Old Slow Trot": George H. Thomas Steven E. Woodworth Woodworth, Steven E. 23

"Wherever Lee Goes . . .": George G. Meade Ethan S. Rafuse Rafuse, Ethan S. 47

Politics, Ethnicity, and Military Operations: Franz Sigel Earl J. Hess Hess, Earl J. 85

"A Lack of Confidence": Benjamin F. Butler Mark Grimsley Grimsley, Mark 105

Chasing "Old Jube": David Hunter, Lewis Wallace, and Horatio Wright Benjamin Franklin Cooling Cooling, Benjamin Franklin 133

"In the Right Place and at the Right Time": Philip H. Sheridan Steven E. Nash Nash, Steven E. 155

Grant's Relief Man: Edward O. C. Ord William B. Feis Feis, William B. 173

More Than a "First-Rate Clerk": Henry W. Halleck Mark Grimsley Grimsley, Mark 195

Notes 217

List of Contributors 249

Index 251

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 20, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Excellent end to the series

    Doing a book of essays is challenging. Each essay needs to contribute to a central theme while being able to standalone. The essayists bring different perspectives and styles that need to mesh or the result is a mess. Weaving this into a recognizable intelligent book that contributes to the readers understanding of the main subject is no small accomplishment. Steven E. Woodworth once again demonstrates his ability to do just that. This is the second book of essays on Grant's Lieutenants he has edited. This book benefits from star power covering the campaigns where Grant deals with major Civil War figures. While covering Thomas, Meade, Halleck, Sheridan & Sherman, we see a number of obscure generals too. This approach gives us a balanced look what Grant faced and how he managed to handle this very mixed group of men.
    Woodworth's essay on George H. Thomas is one of the best things written about Thomas. In 24 pages, he provides a balanced portrait and covers the difficulties of his relationship with Grant. The considerable Thomas fan club will find much here to be upset over but this is one of the fairest looks at the man I have seen.
    Ethan S. Rafuse looks at George G. Meade in the longest essay in the book. This is the critical relationship during this period and gets the required space. This excellent piece captures the contentious, friendly and often difficult relationship. This is very factual, devoid of sentiment or blame detailing the command structure that wins the war in Virginia.
    Earl J. Hess covers the always-difficult Franz Sigel and Grant's immersion in ethnic politics. Benjamin Franklin Cooling provides a different perspective on Jubal Early's 1864 Raid and the North's response looking at Hunter, Wallace and Wright. This leads us into Steven E. Nash's excellent look at Philip H. Sheridan. Grant was not always right about people and William B. Feis gives us an example of this with Edward O. C. Ord.
    Mark Grimsley contributes two excellent views given Benjamin F. Butler he made the case that Henry W. Halleck had to be included. After getting them to agree, he got the assignment to write it. The happy result is two excellent essays that fairly cover these difficult generals.
    You will not find a detailed in-depth analysis in 20-pages. It is not possible to produce something readable in that short a space. What you have is an excellent overview of these men. While not highly detailed, nothing important is omitted and many secondary items are considered. Each author is a respected historian with deep knowledge of the subject and excellent writing skills. The result is an enjoyable, informative read that completes the series on a high note.

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