Graphic Classics, Volume 5: Jack London

Graphic Classics, Volume 5: Jack London

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by Arnold Arre, Jack London, Rod Lott, Trina Robbins
     
 

Graphic Classics: Jack London returns to print in a completely revised second edition, with over 50 pages of new material. New to this edition are adaptations of "The Red One" illustrated by Mark A. Nelson and "The Wit of Porportuk" by Arnold Arre. Plus a new comics adaptation of "To Kill a Man" by Kostas Aronis and a completely redrawn "That Spot" by Nick

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Overview

Graphic Classics: Jack London returns to print in a completely revised second edition, with over 50 pages of new material. New to this edition are adaptations of "The Red One" illustrated by Mark A. Nelson and "The Wit of Porportuk" by Arnold Arre. Plus a new comics adaptation of "To Kill a Man" by Kostas Aronis and a completely redrawn "That Spot" by Nick Miller. Returning from the previous edition are "A Thousand Deaths" by J.B. Bonivert, "Jan, the Unrepentant" by Hunt Emerson and six more thrilling stories. With a dramatic new cover by Jim Nelson.

Editorial Reviews

VOYA
For those who have read only mainstream works by Jack London, such as Call of the Wild, this collection of stories in graphic format will put London in a different light. Subtitled "A Thousand Deaths Plus More Stories of Adventure, Horror and Science Fiction," this collection is truly bizarre. In one tale, a father makes his son a victim of his grotesque experiments whereas another is based on what London claims is a true incident in which sailors decide to kill and eat one of the younger boys aboard their ship. Another inclusion is London's thought-provoking story War. A tale of one-upmanship between two friends reflects the two oft-visited themes of competitiveness and greed in the collection. The last entry is The Call of Jack London, which succinctly explores London's life as a writer, highlighting his struggle with alcohol. Teachers who are doing a unit on London or on short stories could use this collection as a supplemental work, pointing out some of the more bizarre stories and disreputable characters. London's regime of a thousand words a day as a writer clearly caused him to produce some less-than-polished pieces, although some tales are sure to promote interesting class discussions. London's junior or senior high fans will discover a fascinating collection, whereas the graphic style and rather lurid cover will attract other readers, London fans or not. This interesting collection is a worthy purchase for libraries and classrooms but certainly not essential. VOYA Codes: 3Q 3P J S G (Readable without serious defects; Will appeal with pushing; Junior High, defined as grades 7 to 9; Senior High, defined as grades 10 to 12; ~G). 2003, Eureka Productions, G144p,
— Mary AnnDarby
KLIATT - George Galuschak
This volume of Graphic Classics highlights the work of Jack London; included are a number of short stories and one essay—"How I Became A Socialist." The Call of the Wild and White Fang are notable by their absence. This is the second edition of Graphic Classics: Jack London, and it contains a number of new and revised stories. New to this edition is "The Red One," the story of a butterfly hunter who runs afoul of a tribe of cannibals who worship The Red One, a huge red rock from outer space. New also is "The Wit of Porportuk," a truly unpleasant tale about an Indian man who sets about reclaiming a woman he considers his property. "That Spot," an amusing tale of a freeloading dog, has been redrawn; and "To Kill A Man," a two-fisted tale of a robbery gone wrong, has been expanded. Graphic Classics is well worth purchasing. It features an ensemble cast of talented writers and artists, including Kostas Aronis, Mark A. Nelson, Milton Knight and Nick Miller. The stories run the gamut from horror to science fiction to adventure. Many of London's tales end with an ironic twist: in "The Francis Spaight," a crew of starving sailors on a marooned ship butcher a cabin boy for food, and are rescued immediately after the deed is done. A few of the stories are frankly unpleasant. Graphic Classics contains comic book violence, some of which may be too intense for younger readers. This graphic novel should do fine in junior high collections on up, and is highly recommended for libraries that do not own the first edition.
School Library Journal
Adult/High School-In these volumes, works by Bierce and London are illustrated by various artists, including "Classics Illustrated" vets Gahan Wilson and Rick Geary. Bierce retells, gleefully and morbidly, significant portions of the author's cynical, epigrammatic oeuvre, including "The Devil's Dictionary" and "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge." London offers readers a chance to examine some of the author's lesser-known works, and fans will be fascinated to see his themes-the great outdoors, the icy north, social injustice-woven into these Twilight Zone-esque tales. As an enlightening record of an author and his work, this is the more interesting of the two, although the stories are formulaic, often ending in a macabre twist. In "Just Meat," two thieves poison one another in a dispute over their loot; in "The Leopard Man's Story," a lion tamer's enemy finally gets the best of him, etc. In both books, the sheer variety of artistic styles, all in black and white, is both a strength and weakness. While the diversity of techniques is intriguing, individual tastes will draw readers to some stories more than to others. Older readers may enjoy the black humor and wit of these books; their violence (however comical), un-PC views, and severely pessimistic nature will limit their appeal with younger readers.-Douglas P. Davey, Guelph Public Library, Ontario, Canada Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780974664880
Publisher:
Eureka Productions
Publication date:
10/25/2006
Series:
Graphic Classics Series
Edition description:
2nd Edition
Pages:
144
Product dimensions:
7.00(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.25(d)

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