Graphic Classics, Volume 6: Ambrose Bierce

Graphic Classics, Volume 6: Ambrose Bierce

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by Steven Cerio, Ambrose Bierce, Mort Castle, Rod Lott
     
 

Graphic Classics: Ambrose Bierce is revised, with 70 new pages, including new comics adaptations of "Moxon's Master", "The Damned Thing" and "The Monk and the Hangman's Daughter". Returning from the first edition are "The Stranger" and four other tales, plus a collection of 20 short fables illustrated by Dan O'Neill, Shary Flenniken, Florence Cestac, Johnny

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Overview

Graphic Classics: Ambrose Bierce is revised, with 70 new pages, including new comics adaptations of "Moxon's Master", "The Damned Thing" and "The Monk and the Hangman's Daughter". Returning from the first edition are "The Stranger" and four other tales, plus a collection of 20 short fables illustrated by Dan O'Neill, Shary Flenniken, Florence Cestac, Johnny Ryan and more great artists. With a stunning cover illustration by Steven Cerio.

Editorial Reviews

VOYA
Reigning names in the comic book and graphic novel communities band together to give some of the shorter stories by two literary lions, Ambrose Bierce and Bram Stoker, the panelized treatment, and the results are fantastic. In an age in which comics and their kin are being recognized for their capabilities for superb storytelling, fans can thank Neil Gaiman for his Sandman books and Kevin Smith for Green Arrow: Quiver and Daredevil: Visionaries. What better way to further the format's credibility than by putting some classic writers' less famous work into the excitingly different medium? Stoker will draw more curious onlookers than the lesser-known Bierce, but both books are equally interesting. Readers will do better to start with the probably unknown entity, satirist Bierce, and savor the anticipation for Stoker in the meantime. High points for the Ambrose book are An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge, illustrated by John Coulthart; An Imperfect Conflagration by Rick Geary; and Michael Slack's rendition of The Hypnotist. Selections from Dracula are included, but the best Stoker offerings are Rico Sacherel's Lair of the White Worm and the creepy The Judge's House from Jerry Alanguilan. With their dramatic retellings and marvelous artwork, the books prove interesting and entertaining on their own. Certainly, they make the prospect of reading pre-1920s literature seem like less of a chore and more of a choice. But ultimately, they go one step even better: Many readers might just be interested enough to seek out more Stoker and Bierce on their own. VOYA CODES: 5Q 3P M J S A/YA G (Hard to imagine it being any better written; Will appeal with pushing; Middle School, defined as grades 6 to 8;Junior High, defined as grades 7 to 9; Senior High, defined as grades 10 to 12; Adult-marketed book recommended for Young Adults; Graphic Novel Format). 2003, Eureka Productions, 144p., Trade pb. Ages 11 to Adult.
—Matthew Weaver
School Library Journal
Adult/High School-In these volumes, works by Bierce and London are illustrated by various artists, including "Classics Illustrated" vets Gahan Wilson and Rick Geary. Bierce retells, gleefully and morbidly, significant portions of the author's cynical, epigrammatic oeuvre, including "The Devil's Dictionary" and "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge." London offers readers a chance to examine some of the author's lesser-known works, and fans will be fascinated to see his themes-the great outdoors, the icy north, social injustice-woven into these Twilight Zone-esque tales. As an enlightening record of an author and his work, this is the more interesting of the two, although the stories are formulaic, often ending in a macabre twist. In "Just Meat," two thieves poison one another in a dispute over their loot; in "The Leopard Man's Story," a lion tamer's enemy finally gets the best of him, etc. In both books, the sheer variety of artistic styles, all in black and white, is both a strength and weakness. While the diversity of techniques is intriguing, individual tastes will draw readers to some stories more than to others. Older readers may enjoy the black humor and wit of these books; their violence (however comical), un-PC views, and severely pessimistic nature will limit their appeal with younger readers.-Douglas P. Davey, Guelph Public Library, Ontario, Canada Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780978791957
Publisher:
Eureka Productions
Publication date:
09/23/2008
Series:
Graphic Classics Series
Edition description:
2nd Edition
Pages:
144
Product dimensions:
6.70(w) x 9.80(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
12 - 17 Years

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