Graphic Design History / Edition 2

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Overview

A Fresh Look at the History of Graphic Design

Graphic Design History, 2nd edition is a critical approach to the history of graphic design. Organized chronologically, the book demonstrates the connection to the current practices of graphic arts, visual expression, and design with its engaging narrative and special features.

With new images, chapter revisions, and features like Tools of the Trade, the authors stay true to connecting what designers do every day to a history of innovative graphic forms and effects. The MySearchLab with eText provides students and professors a new and exciting way to view Graphic Design History. Instructor PowerPoints featuring nearly all of the images from the text make class preparation easier than ever with this new edition.

A better teaching and learning experience

This program will provide a better teaching and learning experience– for you and your students. Here’s how:

  • Personalize Learning — The new MySearchLab delivers proven results in helping students succeed, provides engaging experiences that personalize learning, and comes from a trusted partner with educational expertise and a deep commitment to helping students and instructors achieve their goals.
  • Improve Critical Thinking — Chapters are framed by critical issues and historical themes so that students can fully grasp an understanding of the history of graphic design.
  • Engage Students — Timelines and images with detailed captions easily highlight relevant information for students.
  • Support Instructors — New MySearchLab with eText and high resolution PowerPoint are available for this text.

Note: MySearchLab with eText does not come automatically packaged with this text. To purchase MySearchLab with eText, please visit www.mysearchlab.com or you can purchase a ValuePack of the text + MySearchLab with eText (at no additional cost).

ValuePack ISBN-10: 0205867715 / ValuePack ISBN-13: 9780205867714

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Good typeface choices and settings. It never feels text-heavy, so it visually makes for a non-threatening read, which is important for today's students. The use of the red text within each chapter helps to emphasis important concepts. The use of the timeline and list of tools at the end of each chapter is very good in placing graphic design within the larger context of human history.

– John Luttropp, Montclair State University

An excellent critical overview. Somewhat inclined toward sweeping generalizations, but a refreshing re-calibration of graphic design history texts.

– Peter Hall, University of Texas at Austin

Thorough, easy reading, it's almost like reading a "novel" it's so fascinating. The author's love for the subject matter shines through.

– Grace Fowler, Palomar College

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780205219469
  • Publisher: Pearson
  • Publication date: 3/16/2012
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 416
  • Sales rank: 432,122
  • Product dimensions: 8.50 (w) x 10.80 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Johanna Drucker is the Breslauer Professor of Bibliographical Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles. She has been on the faculty of Yale University, SUNY Purchase, Columbia University, and the University of Virginia, as well as holding a Mellon Faculty Fellowship at Harvard, a Fulbright Fellowship, and a Getty Fellowship. Her previous publications include The Alphabetic Labyrinth (1995), The Century of Artists’ Books (1995), The Visible Word (1994), and Sweet Dreams (2005). She is also known for her work as a book artist and visual poet.

Emily McVarish is Associate Professor of Graphic Design at California College of the Arts, where she teaches experimental typography and writing, design history and theory, and topical studios. A writer, designer, and book artist, she has maintained a hybrid practice in San Francisco since 1990. Her work has been exhibited internationally, published by Granary Books, and collected by Harvard University and the British Library, among other major libraries and museums. Her writing has been featured in Visible Language and Design and Culture.

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Table of Contents

In this Section:

1. Brief Table of Contents

2. Full Table of Contents


1. BRIEF TABLE OF CONTENTS

Chapter 1 From Prehistory to Early Writing 35,000—500 BCE

Chapter 2 Classical Literacy 700 BCE—400 CE

Chapter 3 Medieval Letterforms and Book Formats 400—1450

Chapter 4 Renaissance Design: Standardization and Modularization in Print 1450—1660

Chapter 5 Modern Typography and the Creation of the Public Sphere 1660—1800

Chapter 6 The Graphic Effects of Industrial Production 1800—1850

Chapter 7 Mass Mediation 1850—1900s

Chapter 8 Formations of the Modern Movement 1880s—1910s

Chapter 9 Innovation and Persuasion 1910—1930

Chapter 10 The Culture of Consumption 1920s—1930s

Chapter 11 Public Interest Campaigns and Information Design 1930s—1950s

Chapter 12 Corporate Identities and International Style 1950s—1970s

Chapter 13 Pop and Protest 1960s—1970s

Chapter 14 Postmodernism in Design 1970s—1980s and Beyond

Chapter 15 Digital Design 1970s—2000s

Chapter 16 Graphic Design and Globalization


2. FULL TABLE OF CONTENTS

Chapter 1: From Prehistory to Early Writing 35,000—500 BCE

Mark-making

Prehistory

Proto-writing

Early writing

The spread of writing as idea and script

The alphabet

Conclusion

Timeline

Tools of the trade

Chapter 2: Classical Literacy 700 BCE—400 CE

Variations of literacy and the alphabet

The function of graphic codes

Models of writing: gestural and constructed

Writing at the end of the Classical age

Conclusion

Timeline

Tools of the trade

Chapter 3: Medieval Letterforms and Book Formats 400—1450

Medieval culture and graphic communication

Graphic media and contexts

The codex book

Letterforms, manuscript hands, and pattern books

Graphic forms of knowledge

Publishing communities and graphic arts

Conclusion

Timeline

Tools of the trade

Chapter 4: Renaissance Design: Standardization and Modularization in Print 1450—1660

Early print design

Graphic communication in Renaissance culture

Print technology and type design

Graphic forms of knowledge

Conclusion

Timeline

Tools of the trade

Chapter 5: Modern Typography and the Creation of the Public Sphere 1660—1800

Printed matter and the public sphere

Newsbooks, broadsheets, and newspapers

Politics and the press

Graphic arts and design

Modern type design

On the edge of industrialization

Conclusion

Timeline

Tools of the trade

Chapter 6: The Graphic Effects of Industrial Production 1800—1850

Industrialization and visual culture

Illustrated papers

Book design for mass production

Printing images

Advertising design and typography

Fine art and graphic art

Critical issues

Conclusion

Timeline

Tools of the trade

Chapter 7: Mass Mediation 1850—1900s

Printed mass media

Changes in print technology

Changing patterns in the use of graphic media

Media networks

Graphic design and advertising

Posters and public space

Conclusion

Timeline

Tools of the trade

Chapter 8: Formations of the Modern Movement 1880s—1910s

Responses to industrialism

Arts and Crafts publications

Arts and Crafts dissemination

Art Nouveau

Jugendstil

Viennese design

Decadence and Aestheticism

The private press movement and modern design

Integration of design and industry

Conclusion

Timeline

Tools of the trade

Chapter 9: Innovation and Persuasion 1910—1930

Visual culture and avant-garde design

The graphic impact of Futurism and Dada

From experiment to principles

Propaganda and mass communication studies

Graphic persuasion and its effects

Institutionalizing graphic design

Conclusion

Timeline

Tools of the trade

Chapter 10: The Culture of Consumption 1920s—1930s

Designing the modern lifestyle

Modern style in graphic design

Consumer culture

The profession

Conclusion

Timeline

Tools of the trade

Chapter 11: Public Interest Campaigns and Information Design 1930s—1950s

Public interest and education

Photojournalism and documentary

Wartime propaganda

Wartime information

Commercial and technical uses of information design

Information analysis and design process

Conclusion

Timeline

Tools of the trade

Chapter 12: Corporate Identities and International Style 1950s—1970s

Image and identity systems

International style

Style, systems, and graphic design concepts

Technology

The profession

Conclusion

Timeline

Tools of the trade

Chapter 13: Pop and Protest 1960s—1970s

Pop culture and style

Self-conscious graphic design

Slick surfaces and high production values

Counterculture and the alternative press

Revolutionary culture and protest

Changes in the profession

Critical vocabulary

Conclusion

Timeline

Tools of the trade

Chapter 14: Postmodernism in Design 1970s—1980s and Beyond

Postmodern styles

Postmodern consumption and conservatism

Critical theory and postmodern sensibility

Postmodernism and activism

Changes in the profession

Conclusion

Timeline

Tools of the trade

Chapter 15: Digital Design 1970s—2000s

Digital technology: from punch cards and plotters to desktop computing

Media transitions: type design and publications

Fluidity and functionality

The myth of immateriality and challenges of digital design

Conclusion

Timeline

Tools of the trade

Chapter 16: Graphic Design and Globalization

Globalization and design

Global encounters in design

Global networks and technology

Conclusion

Timeline

Tools of the trade

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