Graphic Guide to Frame Construction: Details for Builders and Designers

Graphic Guide to Frame Construction: Details for Builders and Designers

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by Robert Thallon
     
 

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A classic reference, the Graphic Guide to Frame Construction is a comprehensive visual handbook filled with hundreds of meticulous drawings showing the framing details you need to understand when building with wood. This revised fourth edition reflects the most recent changes in residential frame construction. It contains more details for engineered wood

Overview

A classic reference, the Graphic Guide to Frame Construction is a comprehensive visual handbook filled with hundreds of meticulous drawings showing the framing details you need to understand when building with wood. This revised fourth edition reflects the most recent changes in residential frame construction. It contains more details for engineered wood products, fasteners, and seismic hold-down requirements, as well as the latest IRC code updates. It is well annotated and covers foundations, floors, walls, stairs, and roofs. Because examples are taken from actual job sites by a trusted expert, this book is an invaluable visual aid that can help builders and homeowners alike to tackle a wide range of framing projects.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
For over 100 years, the majority of North American homes have been built using wooden framing. This technique is strong, conserves materials, and allows great design flexibility. Framing Basics (part of Sterling's excellent "Basics" series, which covers numerous tools and woodworking techniques) offers a helpful introduction to framing for do-it-yourselfers. Readers for whom this book is intended aren't going to build an entire house; they are homeowners who want to move, remove, or install a wall or create built-in storage. Peters covers tool-use, materials, methods of work, and demolition in easily understood text supplemented with numerous color photographs. Thallon, a professor of architecture, takes frame construction to the next level, showing how to build a house's entire shell from the foundation to the roof. He believes that when properly constructed, a wood-framed house should be able to last for 200 years or more. This title's intended audience is professional builders and designers; a great deal of reader knowledge is assumed by the author. Broad sections include foundations, floors, walls, roofs, and stairs. The text is brief and to the point, with a huge number of excellent illustrations providing the details. Libraries that own the original edition (1991) of this title should consider this revision--it covers recent developments such as new sheathing methods, wood I-joists, and vinyl windows. A comprehensive glossary and list of resources round out this title. Structural insulated panels (SIPs) consist of slabs of foam insulation sandwiched between oriented strand board or plywood. They represent one of the newest technologies and may render wood-framing methods obsolete. Morley, a builder who specializes in SIPs construction, gives a compelling argument for this new system--it's structurally superior, better insulated, faster to erect, and more environmentally friendly than traditional methods. The use of SIPs requires many specialized tools and techniques, all of which are covered in detail. A large resource list provides the names of architects, builders, and companies that deal with this system. Framing Basics is well written and is geared toward the beginner; with other titles in Sterling's "Basics" series, it deserves a place in most public library collections. Both Thallon's and Morley's works are excellent but are geared toward a specialized audience; public libraries with comprehensive collections and academic library architecture collections should consider them.--Jonathan Hershey, Akron-Summit Cty. P.L. Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Booknews
A practical, lucid set of drawings of construction details with notes explaining mechanics, materials, installation. We come away believing a complete klutz could build a house--at least an outhouse. Published by The Taunton Press, 63 South Main Street, Box 355, Newtown, CT 06470. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781561583539
Publisher:
Taunton Press, Incorporated
Publication date:
10/28/2000
Series:
For Pros By Pros Series
Edition description:
2nd ed.
Pages:
252
Product dimensions:
8.82(w) x 10.68(h) x 0.52(d)

Meet the Author

Rob Thallon, architect and Associate Professor of Architecture at the University of Oregon, is the author of the bestselling series of guides: "Graphic Guide to Frame Construction, Graphic Guide to Site Construction, and Graphic Guide to Interior Details." He has more than 30 years of experience in residential design construction and has designed many custom houses and housing complexes.

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Graphic Guide to Frame Construction: Details for Builders and Designers 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
A must for any architect's library. I have used this guide since I was in college. From the Taunton press, the people who publish Fine Homebuilding, also a must have magazine for any architect.