Grasshopper Summer

Grasshopper Summer

3.2 5
by Ann Turner, Erika Meltzer
     
 

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In 1874, eleven-year-old Sam White and his family are moving from Kentucky to the Dakota Territory. These hardy pioneers know it will be hard work, but they don't expect the devastating plague that comes like an unstoppable force to sweep away all their hopes for the future. They will cope.
But they will never forget this grasshopper summer.

Overview

In 1874, eleven-year-old Sam White and his family are moving from Kentucky to the Dakota Territory. These hardy pioneers know it will be hard work, but they don't expect the devastating plague that comes like an unstoppable force to sweep away all their hopes for the future. They will cope.
But they will never forget this grasshopper summer.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Kirkus Reviews Ann Turner recreates a quintessential American experience — a pioneer trek to the Dakota Territory and the tragic loss of a harvest. A beautifully written book.

Horn Book Both a family story and an account of pioneer living, the book is accessible as well as informative.

School Library Journal A good realistic novel of frontier life.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780689835223
Publisher:
Aladdin
Publication date:
05/01/2000
Edition description:
1 ALADDIN
Pages:
176
Sales rank:
183,372
Product dimensions:
5.20(w) x 7.60(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

Ann Turner, author of other stories about Early American life including Dakota Dugout and Nettie's Trip South (both in Aladdin Paperback editions), lives in western Massachusetts.

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Grasshopper Summer 3.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
storiesforchildren More than 1 year ago
Set in 1874, this book tells how eleven-year-old Sam and his ten-year-old brother Billy move with their father and mother from Kentucky, where their grandfather's farm had been ravaged during the Civil War, to the southern Dakota Territory, where they experience a plague of hungry grasshoppers. Will they return home or stay? It is a very interesting story about pioneer life in the 1870s, told in an easy-to-read manner that can be very helpful in enabling children to understand the hardship of the western settlers. The language is not too bad--there are some euphemisms (dratted, gosh, darn) and the term "God" is used occasionally as an interjection (also Billy says that it was hot as "Hades" but his mother reproved him for it), but I really do not think that books for young people need to be talking about children's getting into Pa's corn liquor and Pa's letting his two young sons take a puff on his "cheroot" (cigar). Most of this I was able to edit out when we read it aloud. There are occasional references to religion and going to church, but there was also a lot of superstition (e.g., rubbing a rabbit's foot). Otherwise, I think it gives a good look at the trials and triumphs of our nation's pioneers. Ann Turner is also the author of other stories about early American life such as Dakota Dugout, Nettie's Trip South, Third Girl from the Left, Tickle a Pickle, and Time of the Bison.
KentuckyTeacher More than 1 year ago
Each year when our fifth-graders are learning about western expansion in social studies, we read Grasshopper Summer in our reading class. This is a historical fiction book that takes place in the 1870s when families moved west for land. Sam White is an eleven-year-old who reluctantly moves with his family from his home in Kentucky where he is happy with his pa and ma, younger brother Billy, and grandma and grandpa. Pa is a former confederate soldier and wants a new place to start over. On the way the family faces tragedy and hardships but finds courage as they settle in the Dakota Territory and begin their new life.
When Sam and his family begin to adapt to the new frontier, a tragedy strikes. They are forced to decide whether to move back to the comfort of their old home, or stay and persevere on their new land of promise.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a very interesting book about pioneer life in the 1870's. The language is not too bad, but I really do not think that books for 8 to 12 year olds need to be talking about children getting into Pa's corn liquor and Pa letting his 11 and 10 year old boys take a puff on his cheroot. Otherwise, I think it gives a good look at the trials and triumphs of our nation's pioneers.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I thought this book was excellent and encourage other elementary school kids to read this book. It will teach you alote about farmers that have to go through getting grasshoppers away from eating their crops.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I thought this book was quite boring. I, myself, didn't enjoy it, but it was well written and I'm sure a lot of people would like it. I had to read it as a class assignment in fifth grade. I don't know many kids who liked it. But don't listen to my judgement, read and find out what you think.