The Great American Mission: Modernization and the Construction of an American World Order

Paperback (Print)
Buy Used
Buy Used from BN.com
$15.27
(Save 41%)
Item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging.
Condition: Used – Good details
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $4.50
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 82%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (13) from $4.50   
  • New (7) from $14.97   
  • Used (6) from $4.50   

Overview

"An extraordinarily important book. Ekbladh puts concepts of development and modernization at the heart of America's global expansion in the twentieth century and thereby helps us understand the forces that move U.S. foreign policy, both yesterday and today."—O. A. Westad, author of The Global Cold War: Third World Interventions and the Making of Our Times

"A comprehensive history of developmentalism as it became increasingly central to U.S. foreign affairs in the twentieth century. The legacy is still with us, and anyone interested in finding out what may have happened to the 'American century' will find the book an excellent guide and a rich source of information and insights."—Akira Iriye, Harvard University

"Cogent and compelling. The Great American Mission illuminates for the first time how the central characteristics of America's modernization project in the Cold War came together in the prewar period. Carefully tracing ideas, institutions, and individuals from the Depression to the heyday of development, Ekbladh offers new insights into the distinctive components of American modernization efforts abroad."—David C. Engerman, Brandeis University

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Foreign Affairs
In this important book, Ekbladh provides one of the most compelling portraits yet of the liberal ideas that guide U.S. foreign policy. . . . Even though the liberal vision of modernization lost appeal amid the trauma of the Vietnam War, as Ekbladh's fascinating account makes clear, it remains deeply embedded in the American imagination.
— John Ikenberry
Political Science Quarterly
[T]his is a book with a broad mandate. . . . It is a significant contribution to have such a compelling account of the overall strategic impetus of American development during, before, and after the Cold War.
— Travis Nelson
Choice
Ekbladh offers a sweeping, provocative appraisal of the U.S. attempt to employ development as an ideological weapon.
Journal of American Studies
[E]rudite and ambitious. . . . [A]n illuminating and compelling read.
— David Milne
International Affairs
The Great American Mission deserves to take its place among the literature on the evolution of US foreign relations in the twentieth century.
— Nicolas Bouchet
Journal of Transatlantic Studies
David Ekbladh's excellent new book does valuable work in illustrating much of this complexity, and fleshing out its rich historical detail. He not only provides an impressive account of the evolution of American thinking about 'development' and 'modernisation', but also places this firmly in the context of both social and intellectual trends at work within the United States and the external demands being made of its foreign policy.
— Adam Quinn
Political Science Journal
[A]s a historical narrative it constitutes a very valuable and thorough contribution to understanding how modernization ideas furnished the foundations of American post-war development policy, whilst also supplying a series of interesting portraits of almost-forgotten figures who were intimately associated with this enterprise. . . . [T]he book is a substantial contribution both to the literatures on the Cold War as well as the history of Western development policy, making it a worthwhile book for the specialist and the interested general reader alike.
— Willem Oosterveld
Foreign Affairs - John Ikenberry
In this important book, Ekbladh provides one of the most compelling portraits yet of the liberal ideas that guide U.S. foreign policy. . . . Even though the liberal vision of modernization lost appeal amid the trauma of the Vietnam War, as Ekbladh's fascinating account makes clear, it remains deeply embedded in the American imagination.
Political Science Quarterly - Travis Nelson
[T]his is a book with a broad mandate. . . . It is a significant contribution to have such a compelling account of the overall strategic impetus of American development during, before, and after the Cold War.
Journal of American Studies - David Milne
[E]rudite and ambitious. . . . [A]n illuminating and compelling read.
International Affairs - Nicolas Bouchet
The Great American Mission deserves to take its place among the literature on the evolution of US foreign relations in the twentieth century.
Journal of Transatlantic Studies - Adam Quinn
David Ekbladh's excellent new book does valuable work in illustrating much of this complexity, and fleshing out its rich historical detail. He not only provides an impressive account of the evolution of American thinking about 'development' and 'modernisation', but also places this firmly in the context of both social and intellectual trends at work within the United States and the external demands being made of its foreign policy.
Political Science Journal - Willem Oosterveld
[A]s a historical narrative it constitutes a very valuable and thorough contribution to understanding how modernization ideas furnished the foundations of American post-war development policy, whilst also supplying a series of interesting portraits of almost-forgotten figures who were intimately associated with this enterprise. . . . [T]he book is a substantial contribution both to the literatures on the Cold War as well as the history of Western development policy, making it a worthwhile book for the specialist and the interested general reader alike.
From the Publisher
Winner of the 2011 Stuart L. Bernath Book Prize, Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations

Winner of the 2010 Best First Book Award, Phi Alpha Theta

"In this important book, Ekbladh provides one of the most compelling portraits yet of the liberal ideas that guide U.S. foreign policy. . . . Even though the liberal vision of modernization lost appeal amid the trauma of the Vietnam War, as Ekbladh's fascinating account makes clear, it remains deeply embedded in the American imagination."—John Ikenberry, Foreign Affairs

"[T]his is a book with a broad mandate. . . . It is a significant contribution to have such a compelling account of the overall strategic impetus of American development during, before, and after the Cold War."—Travis Nelson, Political Science Quarterly

"Ekbladh offers a sweeping, provocative appraisal of the U.S. attempt to employ development as an ideological weapon."—Choice

"[E]rudite and ambitious. . . . [A]n illuminating and compelling read."—David Milne, Journal of American Studies

"The Great American Mission deserves to take its place among the literature on the evolution of US foreign relations in the twentieth century."—Nicolas Bouchet, International Affairs

"David Ekbladh's excellent new book does valuable work in illustrating much of this complexity, and fleshing out its rich historical detail. He not only provides an impressive account of the evolution of American thinking about 'development' and 'modernisation', but also places this firmly in the context of both social and intellectual trends at work within the United States and the external demands being made of its foreign policy."—Adam Quinn, Journal of Transatlantic Studies

"[A]s a historical narrative it constitutes a very valuable and thorough contribution to understanding how modernization ideas furnished the foundations of American post-war development policy, whilst also supplying a series of interesting portraits of almost-forgotten figures who were intimately associated with this enterprise. . . . [T]he book is a substantial contribution both to the literatures on the Cold War as well as the history of Western development policy, making it a worthwhile book for the specialist and the interested general reader alike."—Willem Oosterveld, Political Science Journal

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780691152455
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • Publication date: 8/28/2011
  • Series: America in the World
  • Pages: 408
  • Sales rank: 838,864
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

David Ekbladh is assistant professor of history at Tufts University.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations ix
Acknowledgments xi
List of Abbreviations xv
INTRODUCTION 1
CHAPTER 1: The Rise of an American Style of Development, 1914-1937 14
CHAPTER 2: The Only Road for Mankind: "Modernisation" to Meet the Challenge of Totalitarianism, 1933-1944 40
CHAPTER 3: A Gospel of Liberalism: Point Four and Modernization as National Policy, 1943-1952 77
CHAPTER 4: "The Proving Ground": Modernization and U.S. Policy in Northeast Asia, 1945-1960 114
CHAPTER 5: "The Great American Mission": Modernization and the United States in the World, 1952-1960 153
CHAPTER 6: A TVA on the Mekong: Modernization at War in Southeast Asia, 1960-1973 190
CHAPTER 7: "Everything Is Going Wrong": The Crisis of Development and the End of the Postwar Consensus 226
CHAPTER 8: New Developments: From the Cold War to the "War on Terror" 257
Notes 275
Bibliography 337
Index 373

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)