The Great Atlas of the Stars

( 3 )

Overview

Author Biography: Serge Brunier (the author), is a television commentator, journalist, scriptwriter and longtime editor-in-chief of the magazine Ciel et Espace. He has written bestselling books for experts and beginners including Majestic Universe: Views from Here to Infinity and Glorious Exlipses: Their Past, Present and Future, written in collaboration with Jean-Pierre Luminet and Voyage dans le système solaire, which was awarded the 1997 Astronomy Book Prize.

In 1986, he ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Other Format)
  • All (11) from $10.00   
  • New (1) from $97.11   
  • Used (10) from $10.00   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$97.11
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(142)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
2001 Spiral-bound Isbn matches spiral bound softcover new in shrink wrap FAST SHIPPING W/ CONFIRMATION. NO PRIORITY OR INTERNATIONAL ORDERS OVER 4LBs.

Ships from: ypsilanti, MI

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

Author Biography: Serge Brunier (the author), is a television commentator, journalist, scriptwriter and longtime editor-in-chief of the magazine Ciel et Espace. He has written bestselling books for experts and beginners including Majestic Universe: Views from Here to Infinity and Glorious Exlipses: Their Past, Present and Future, written in collaboration with Jean-Pierre Luminet and Voyage dans le système solaire, which was awarded the 1997 Astronomy Book Prize.

In 1986, he received the Montyon Prize from the Académie Française and was awarded the Henry Rey Prize by the Société Astronomique de France. As a tribute to his work popularizing science, the International Astronomy Union named asteroid No. 10943 after Serge Brunier.

During the day, Akira Fujii (the photographer) is an illustrator, photographer and writer. At night, he observes and photographs the universe using an exclusive process he developed. Akira Fujii is the first astronomer to have adapted classical photography techniques in astronomic imagery. Thus, the photograph obtained is an exact replica of the night sky as seen with the naked eye. To enable him to have a clear view of both celestial hemispheres, the astrophotographer has built two observatories: one in the Japanese Alps, not far from Mount Nasu, and the other in the Australian desert.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Choice
What makes it special, however, are the sumptuous color illustrations.
— B.E. Fleury
American Reference Book Annual
This atlas is an absolutely gorgeous book. The photography is this volume is awesome.
— Mark A. Wilson
Air and Space
Excels at placing stellar objects in their context ... Genuinely helpful.
— Eric Adams
Astronomy
Splendid color spreads of celestial objects, such as the Large Magellanic Cloud, the Orion Nebula, and Omega Centauri.
— Jeremy McGovern
Sky and Telescope
This is a big, beautiful astronomy book ... It reaffirms the power and art of astrophotography.
— Jeff Kanipe
Science Books and Films
Wonderfully attractive ... The entire volume is a delight.
— Jay M. Pasachoff
Professional Surveyor
I can think of no better guide than this book. It is great in both size and approach.
— Patrick Toscano
Halifax Chronicle-Herald
Any stargazer on your list would love this book.
— John McPhee
Montreal Gazette
Almost the size of a tabloid newspaper ... it is user-friendly and designed for frequent use.
— Lynn Moore
B.E. Fleury
Sumptuous color illustrations...[a] book calculated to inspire even the most jaded urban dweller ... Highly recommended.
Choice
Astronomy
This compelling atlas features 30 full-page (11" x 14") constellation photos.
American Reference Book Annual
This atlas is an absolutely gorgeous book. The photography is this volume is awesome.
Sky & Telescope
A big, beautiful astronomy book ... It reaffirms the power and art of astrophotography.
Mercury
Discover stars, nebulae, and galaxies with nearly 200 spectacular images from one of the world's foremost astrophotograhers.
American Reference Book Annual
This atlas is an absolutely gorgeous book. The photography is this volume is awesome.
Canadian Camera
This impressive 11" x 14" book is an authoritative compilation of amazing photographs of 30 of the most important constellations.
Publishers Weekly
Binocular-toting amateur stargazers have a new weapon in constellation recognition with The Great Atlas of the Stars by Serge Brunier (Majestic Universe: Views from Here to Infinity). Brunier features 30 of the 88 constellations visible from earth (focusing on those visible in the northern hemisphere) and offers details about the major stars in each: the luminosity of Cancer's "beehive cluster," for example, or the diameter of Perseus's supergiant star Mirfak. Many of Akira Fujii's gorgeous photographs of the night sky are overlaid with a clear Mylar sheet marked with the names of the constellation's stars and the celestial dot-to-dot of their shapes. (Oct.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature
I was drawn to this book like a magnet. Even if you are a causal stargazer, as I am, you will be awed by the images in this book. A large format, spiral bound volume, it is created to help amateur astronomers find 30 of the most common constellations. Some are visible from both hemispheres, most are visible from the Northern Hemisphere and a few are visible only from the Southern Hemisphere. The first photograph in the book is of hundreds of galaxies up to 10 billion light years away, taken by the Hubble Space Telescope. A nice way to get a personal perspective about our place in the universe. If that wasn't stunning enough, the second photograph is Galaxy M83, which is a spectacular, pinwheeling spiral galaxy. Another is an extreme close-up of the Milky Way in which the stars are as dense as sand on a beach. As breathtaking as these images are, they are the eye candy to the real substance of this book, which is specific information about 30 constellations. An acetate oversheet covers a photograph of the constellation with connecting lines and the names of the major stars. The Big Dipper is the most famous constellation and the first featured. It has a number of bright stars and is a prominent in the northern sky as it revolves around the North Star. The brightest six stars of the constellation are identified with photos and an icon that indicates whether it can be seen with the naked eye, or if a binoculars or telescope are needed. It is interesting to note that some "stars" in constellations are actually galaxies, as in Canes Venatici. Betelgeuse is the closest of the supergiant stars and its orange color contrasts with the blue of the other stars in winter's beautiful Orion. Theremarkable photographs of the constellations were taken by a Japanese amateur astronomer who has dedicated himself to the task of photographing all of the constellations in both the northern and southern skies. 2001, Firefly Books,
— Kristin Harris
Library Journal
This atlas by Brunier, editor in chief of Ciel et Espace ("Sky and Space"), is more coffee-table treat than comprehensive reference. Of the 88 constellations, 30 of the more familiar and easily seen are presented. Of these, 25 are visible from the Northern Hemisphere (ten may be viewed from most locations in the Southern Hemisphere as well), and the rest are visible only from south of the Equator. For each constellation, the text briefly describes three to six celestial objects, ranging from those visible to the naked eye to those detectable only by giant infrared or radio telescopes. The data include distance from Earth, diameter or dimensions, and (for stars) luminosity. Each entry is illustrated by astrophotographer Fujii's absolutely stunning photographs. Labeled plastic overlays trace the shape of the constellations, identify prominent stars, and locate the featured objects. The volume includes a short glossary, some tips on observing the skies, and a very brief overview of astrophotography as well. This is a beautiful book, but truly novice observers would benefit from additional background information and advice such as that offered in Terence Dickinson's Nightwatch: A Practical Guide to Viewing the Universe, which covers the Northern Hemisphere only. A much more detailed and comprehensive atlas, such as Wil Tirion's The Cambridge Star Atlas, would be a better first purchase for libraries serving dedicated amateur astronomers. The binding (covered spiral) is not particularly sturdy. An optional purchase for public and academic libraries. Nancy R. Curtis, Univ. of Maine Lib., Orono Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
School Library Journal
Gr 6 Up-Replete with huge, eye-filling star fields, this oversized astronomical atlas will dazzle both beginning sky watchers and young experts. Selecting 30 of the 88 standard constellations, nearly all of which are visible from the Northern Hemisphere, Brunier provides profiles of the major stars, nebulae, and other phenomena. The profiled objects are located and labeled on Mylar overlays-a neat device for quick orientation to the actual sky. Fujii uses unspecified photographic techniques that fill each image with a carpet of colored stars, while making those that form the constellations stand out; the effect is as beautiful as it is useful. Enhanced by simplified diagrams, specific advice for watching and photographing the nighttime sky, and a concluding table of the 290 brightest stars, this volume makes an appealing companion for more comprehensive but less lavishly illustrated guides, such as Michael E. Bakich's Cambridge Guide to the Constellations (Cambridge, 1995). One caveat: floppy covers and a spiral binding make The Great Atlas an unwieldy guide for field use, but then, how many libraries allow their reference books out at night?-John Peters, New York Public Library Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Booknews
A stunning atlas especially suited for beginning astronomers. Japanese astrophotographer Akira Fujii contributes beautiful photos of 30 of the most well-known northern and southern constellations (and asterisms, i.e., the Big Dipper rather than Ursa Major). Fujii doesn't mention what magnifications he used, but the stars are large and colorful. Each photo includes an acetate overlay labeled with star names, constellation outlines, and three areas (shown as insets on the facing page) containing objects selected for further study<-- >usually a galaxy, nebulae, double star, cluster, or very bright star. Spiral binding. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Maclean's
Gorgeous telescopic images to help even the least experienced of stargazers recognize 30 major constellations.
Booklist
Stunning photographic guide ... The strength of the atlas is in the quantity and quality of the photographs ... The large format of the book (about 10 1/2 by 14 inches) allows for some magnificent color double-page photographs of celestial objects.
Air and Space - Eric Adams
Excels at placing stellar objects in their context ... Genuinely helpful.
Astronomy - Jeremy McGovern
Splendid color spreads of celestial objects, such as the Large Magellanic Cloud, the Orion Nebula, and Omega Centauri.
Sky and Telescope - Jeff Kanipe
From its eye-popping photographs and overlays right down to the drop-shadow graphics and white-space relief, this is a big, beautiful astronomy book ... It reaffirms the power and art of astrophotography to draw us into a universe that the eye can never see, except in dreamland. In this respect, the book will inspire beginners and win over new converts, as well as encourage serious observers to stand back from the eyepiece every now and then and just look up.
Choice - B.E. Fleury
What makes it special, however, are the sumptuous color illustrations. This is the kind of book calculated to inspire even the most jaded urban dweller to look up at the night sky, and to make the brightest constellations more accessible to novice observers who will form the next generation of astronomers. Highly recommended for general readers and lower- and upper-division undergraduates.
American Reference Book Annual - Mark A. Wilson
This atlas is an absolutely gorgeous book. The photography is this volume is awesome ... This book is not only a good reference item for most libraries, it is a good book to have at home for those clear, starry nights.
Montreal Gazette - Lynn Moore
Almost the size of a tabloid newspaper and held together with a spiral binding, it is user-friendly and designed for frequent use.
Halifax Chronicle-Herald - John McPhee
Any stargazer on your list would love this book.
Science Books and Films - Jay M. Pasachoff
Wonderfully attractive ... The entire volume is a delight.
Professional Surveyor - Patrick Toscano
If you ever considered becoming acquainted with the night sky, I can think of no better guide than this book. It is great in both size and approach.
Canadian Camera
This impressive 11" x 14" book is an authoritative compilation of amazing photographs of 30 of the most important constellations.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781552096109
  • Publisher: Firefly Books, Limited
  • Publication date: 10/6/2001
  • Format: Spiral Bound
  • Edition description: SPIRAL
  • Pages: 112
  • Product dimensions: 11.25 (w) x 14.25 (h) x 0.62 (d)

Meet the Author

Serge Brunier is the best-selling author of Majestic Universe: Views from Here to Infinity.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Reading the Night Sky

The beautiful clear night has once again enticed you outdoors to stargaze. But tonight is different. Far from the city lights, the sky has a slightly unsettling presence. Millions of nameless stars hang above the landscape like puppets in a shadow theater. Here, toward the west, a bright star draws your attention. And there, in the south, a few twinkling stars outline a huge geometric shape against the dark, velvety sky.

But how can you find your way around in this multitude of stars? How to recognize the constellations? How far away is that star? Why does this one have an orangy tinge and that one look bluish? In your exploration of the fascinating beauty of the sky you feel somewhat overwhelmed because you can't get your bearings. It seems impossible to name the heavenly bodies and, especially, to describe them.

Twenty years of sitting face to face with the sky in all the corners of our blue planet have led to the creation of The Great Atlas of the Stars to help answer your questions. Since celestial cartography, a science as ancient as humanity, makes reading the sky a complex task, we have removed from The Great Atlas of the Stars everything that is not directly related to stargazing. The connecting lines of the constellations, for example, represent simplified star alignments used by today's amateur astronomers to orient themselves in the sky.

The Great Atlas of the Stars begins with the constellations that are visible in the spring in the northern hemisphere. The northern spring sky is dominated by the famous constellation of the Big Dipper. Once you have found it, it will help you explore the dome of the sky night after night, by following the slow, apparently clockwise movement of the stars with the seasons. Although most of the constellations described in this book are visible in the northern hemisphere, some of them — Sagittarius, Scorpius, or Canis Major, for example — are much easier to see in the tropics. Finally, a few magnificent constellations, such as the Southern Cross, the Centaur or the Keel, are only visible from tropical or southern latitudes. Be sure to pack your atlas of the stars if you take a holiday on a tropical island!

It would take more than a lifetime to explore the entire sky. So we have concentrated on 30 of the most beautiful and well known of the 88 constellations. Among them you will find the brightest, most magnificent stars and the most interesting celestial objects. We have developed and "ID card" for each of these celestial bodies — nebulas, galaxies, star couples and clusters — and outlined their features as we know them today: distance, luminosity and dimensions. Three or six celestial bodies have been described in detail for each of these 30 constellations, so that you can identify all the most beautiful stars visible to the naked eye.

With a curious mind and a bit of training on how to observe the night sky, you will be able to go beyond the most common observation of the Milky Way to explore more unusual cosmic sights. As they are sometimes invisible to the naked eye, you will need a pair of binoculars or an amateur telescope to view them. This is the price of admission to see the most amazing and exotic celestial objects — previously hidden star couples, nebulas illuminated by stars-in-the-making, and distant galaxies separated from us by millions of light-years of emptiness and darkness. Since the study of the stars by both professionals and amateurs, often arises by from profound personal questions about the universe, we have chosen to describe a few phenomena that continue to fascinate astrophysicists — colossal stars, giant black holes that engulf distant stars and galaxies located on the outer edges of space and time. These phenomena, which can only be seen with the most powerful telescopes on earth, will be there, but they will remain invisible in the darkness in the field of your binoculars, hidden behind the dark clouds of the Milky Way or lost in the immensity of the cosmos.

Finally, to bridge the gap generally experienced between abstract astronomy charts and the true starry sky, The Great Atlas of the Stars is illustrated with magnificent photographs of the constellations taken by Japanese astrophotographer Akira Fujii. For the first time we have reproduced these images in large format so that the constellations — which are pictured here as they appear to the unaided eye or with binoculars under perfect observing conditions — are represented on almost the same scale as the celestial models.

Of course, The Great Atlas of the Stars cannot claim to be complete or exhaustive. The Milky Way alone — our galaxy — contains more than a thousand billion stars, and the visible universe contains more than a hundred billion galaxies. But we hope that we have succeeded in presenting simple signposts for identifying the most beautiful celestial landscapes. If these pages help you recognize some stars in the sky the next time the night is clear, and if, night after night, you become more familiar and at ease with the constellations, then we have achieved our goal.

Serge Brunier

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Reading the Night Sky
How to Use Your Atlas Understanding the Universe

Map of the northern sky (northern hemisphere)
Map of the southern sky (southern hemisphere)
The Distant Universe [dbl page astrophoto]
An Island in Space [dbl page astrophoto]
A Spiral Galaxy [dbl page astrophoto]
Our Galaxy [dbl page astrophoto]
The Milky Way [dbl page astrophoto]
Observing 30 Exceptional Constellations
Legend:
* Constellation visible everywhere
** Constellation visible from the northern hemisphere
*** Constellation visible from the southern hemisphere
** The Big Dipper
** The Little Dipper
** Canes Venatici
** Bootes
** Leo
* Virgo
  • Galaxy M104 [dbl page astrophoto]
** Corona Borealis
** Hercules
** Lyra
** Cygnus
* Aquila
* Scorpius
* Sagittarius
* Pegasus
** Andromeda
  • The Great Andromeda Galaxy [dbl page astrophoto]
** Triangulum
**
Cassiopeia
** Perseus
** Aurigaachman 68
* Taurus
  • The Pleiades Star Cluster [dbl page astrophoto]
* Orion
  • The Great Orion Nebula [dbl page astrophoto]
* Canis Major
* Canis Minor
** Gemini
* Cancer
*** Dorado
*** Carina
*** Centaurus
  • The Omega Centaur Cluster [dbl page astrophoto]
*** Crux
*** Tucana
  • The Large Magellanic Cloud [dbl page astrophoto]
The Recreational Stargazer
  • Discovering the Sky
    • Choose a clear night
    • Choose the best conditions
    • What equipment to use?
    • With a simple camera
    • With more sophisticated equipment
    • Akira Fujii, Photographer of the Universe
  • The Brightest Stars
  • Glossary
  • Index
Read More Show Less

Preface

Reading the Night Sky

The beautiful clear night has once again enticed you outdoors to stargaze. But tonight is different. Far from the city lights, the sky has a slightly unsettling presence. Millions of nameless stars hang above the landscape like puppets in a shadow theater. Here, toward the west, a bright star draws your attention. And there, in the south, a few twinkling stars outline a huge geometric shape against the dark, velvety sky.

But how can you find your way around in this multitude of stars? How to recognize the constellations? How far away is that star? Why does this one have an orangy tinge and that one look bluish? In your exploration of the fascinating beauty of the sky you feel somewhat overwhelmed because you can't get your bearings. It seems impossible to name the heavenly bodies and, especially, to describe them.

Twenty years of sitting face to face with the sky in all the corners of our blue planet have led to the creation of The Great Atlas of the Stars to help answer your questions. Since celestial cartography, a science as ancient as humanity, makes reading the sky a complex task, we have removed from The Great Atlas of the Stars everything that is not directly related to stargazing. The connecting lines of the constellations, for example, represent simplified star alignments used by today's amateur astronomers to orient themselves in the sky.

The Great Atlas of the Stars begins with the constellations that are visible in the spring in the northern hemisphere. The northern spring sky is dominated by the famous constellation of the Big Dipper. Once you have found it, it will help you explore the dome of the sky night after night, by following the slow, apparently clockwise movement of the stars with the seasons. Although most of the constellations described in this book are visible in the northern hemisphere, some of them — Sagittarius, Scorpius, or Canis Major, for example — are much easier to see in the tropics. Finally, a few magnificent constellations, such as the Southern Cross, the Centaur or the Keel, are only visible from tropical or southern latitudes. Be sure to pack your atlas of the stars if you take a holiday on a tropical island!

It would take more than a lifetime to explore the entire sky. So we have concentrated on 30 of the most beautiful and well known of the 88 constellations. Among them you will find the brightest, most magnificent stars and the most interesting celestial objects. We have developed and "ID card" for each of these celestial bodies — nebulas, galaxies, star couples and clusters — and outlined their features as we know them today: distance, luminosity and dimensions. Three or six celestial bodies have been described in detail for each of these 30 constellations, so that you can identify all the most beautiful stars visible to the naked eye.

With a curious mind and a bit of training on how to observe the night sky, you will be able to go beyond the most common observation of the Milky Way to explore more unusual cosmic sights. As they are sometimes invisible to the naked eye, you will need a pair of binoculars or an amateur telescope to view them. This is the price of admission to see the most amazing and exotic celestial objects — previously hidden star couples, nebulas illuminated by stars-in-the-making, and distant galaxies separated from us by millions of light-years of emptiness and darkness. Since the study of the stars by both professionals and amateurs, often arises by from profound personal questions about the universe, we have chosen to describe a few phenomena that continue to fascinate astrophysicists — colossal stars, giant black holes that engulf distant stars and galaxies located on the outer edges of space and time. These phenomena, which can only be seen with the most powerful telescopes on earth, will be there, but they will remain invisible in the darkness in the field of your binoculars, hidden behind the dark clouds of the Milky Way or lost in the immensity of the cosmos.

Finally, to bridge the gap generally experienced between abstract astronomy charts and the true starry sky, The Great Atlas of the Stars is illustrated with magnificent photographs of the constellations taken by Japanese astrophotographer Akira Fujii. For the first time we have reproduced these images in large format so that the constellations — which are pictured here as they appear to the unaided eye or with binoculars under perfect observing conditions — are represented on almost the same scale as the celestial models.

Of course, The Great Atlas of the Stars cannot claim to be complete or exhaustive. The Milky Way alone — our galaxy — contains more than a thousand billion stars, and the visible universe contains more than a hundred billion galaxies. But we hope that we have succeeded in presenting simple signposts for identifying the most beautiful celestial landscapes. If these pages help you recognize some stars in the sky the next time the night is clear, and if, night after night, you become more familiar and at ease with the constellations, then we have achieved our goal.

Serge Brunier

Read More Show Less

Introduction

Reading the Night Sky

The beautiful clear night has once again enticed you outdoors to stargaze. But tonight is different. Far from the city lights, the sky has a slightly unsettling presence. Millions of nameless stars hang above the landscape like puppets in a shadow theater. Here, toward the west, a bright star draws your attention. And there, in the south, a few twinkling stars outline a huge geometric shape against the dark, velvety sky.

But how can you find your way around in this multitude of stars? How to recognize the constellations? How far away is that star? Why does this one have an orangy tinge and that one look bluish? In your exploration of the fascinating beauty of the sky you feel somewhat overwhelmed because you can't get your bearings. It seems impossible to name the heavenly bodies and, especially, to describe them.

Twenty years of sitting face to face with the sky in all the corners of our blue planet have led to the creation of The Great Atlas of the Stars to help answer your questions. Since celestial cartography, a science as ancient as humanity, makes reading the sky a complex task, we have removed from The Great Atlas of the Stars everything that is not directly related to stargazing. The connecting lines of the constellations, for example, represent simplified star alignments used by today's amateur astronomers to orient themselves in the sky.

The Great Atlas of the Stars begins with the constellations that are visible in the spring in the northern hemisphere. The northern spring sky is dominated by the famous constellation of the Big Dipper. Once you have found it, it will help you explore the dome of the skynight after night, by following the slow, apparently clockwise movement of the stars with the seasons. Although most of the constellations described in this book are visible in the northern hemisphere, some of them -- Sagittarius, Scorpius, or Canis Major, for example -- are much easier to see in the tropics. Finally, a few magnificent constellations, such as the Southern Cross, the Centaur or the Keel, are only visible from tropical or southern latitudes. Be sure to pack your atlas of the stars if you take a holiday on a tropical island!

It would take more than a lifetime to explore the entire sky. So we have concentrated on 30 of the most beautiful and well known of the 88 constellations. Among them you will find the brightest, most magnificent stars and the most interesting celestial objects. We have developed and "ID card" for each of these celestial bodies -- nebulas, galaxies, star couples and clusters -- and outlined their features as we know them today: distance, luminosity and dimensions. Three or six celestial bodies have been described in detail for each of these 30 constellations, so that you can identify all the most beautiful stars visible to the naked eye.

With a curious mind and a bit of training on how to observe the night sky, you will be able to go beyond the most common observation of the Milky Way to explore more unusual cosmic sights. As they are sometimes invisible to the naked eye, you will need a pair of binoculars or an amateur telescope to view them. This is the price of admission to see the most amazing and exotic celestial objects -- previously hidden star couples, nebulas illuminated by stars-in-the-making, and distant galaxies separated from us by millions of light-years of emptiness and darkness. Since the study of the stars by both professionals and amateurs, often arises by from profound personal questions about the universe, we have chosen to describe a few phenomena that continue to fascinate astrophysicists -- colossal stars, giant black holes that engulf distant stars and galaxies located on the outer edges of space and time. These phenomena, which can only be seen with the most powerful telescopes on earth, will be there, but they will remain invisible in the darkness in the field of your binoculars, hidden behind the dark clouds of the Milky Way or lost in the immensity of the cosmos.

Finally, to bridge the gap generally experienced between abstract astronomy charts and the true starry sky, The Great Atlas of the Stars is illustrated with magnificent photographs of the constellations taken by Japanese astrophotographer Akira Fujii. For the first time we have reproduced these images in large format so that the constellations -- which are pictured here as they appear to the unaided eye or with binoculars under perfect observing conditions -- are represented on almost the same scale as the celestial models.

Of course, The Great Atlas of the Stars cannot claim to be complete or exhaustive. The Milky Way alone -- our galaxy -- contains more than a thousand billion stars, and the visible universe contains more than a hundred billion galaxies. But we hope that we have succeeded in presenting simple signposts for identifying the most beautiful celestial landscapes. If these pages help you recognize some stars in the sky the next time the night is clear, and if, night after night, you become more familiar and at ease with the constellations, then we have achieved our goal.

Serge Brunier

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 3 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(2)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 9, 2003

    Awesome!

    Beautiful, useful and a visual pleasure. This is no dust-gathering coffee picture book- although it looks like one. The rich field, low distortion photographs are absolutely stunning. If you are starting out in astronomy, this book would certainly help you in learning the constellations. For the more experienced observer, this is a useful visual reference guide. Highly recommended!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 24, 2002

    Get This Book!!!

    If you are new or an old pro to astronomy this book is for you. The pictures are excellent and everything you see is explained very well.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 16, 2001

    WOW!

    This is an excellent work for anyone who wants to begin to find out where we sit in the cosmos. The photography is top shelf and the over lays make it easy to find your way about our night sky. The overlays bring instant clairification to what may to many be billions of points of light in the sky at night. And as a coffee table book it will bring the topic into any gathering any inform even the most casual observer. This book is a sure winner in its field.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)