Great Ceviche Book

Overview

Ever the innovator, Douglas Rodriguez was the first American chef to give ceviche the attention it deserves, creating such signature dishes as Spicy Shrimp Ceviche with Popcorn and the decadent Squid Ceviche in Black Ink Sauce. His New York restaurant, Chicama, is a temple to the bright, clean flavors of this remarkably simple dish, and patrons crowd around the ceviche bar to marvel at the day's offerings. In THE GREAT CEVICHE BOOK, Rodriguez presents over 50 traditional and contemporary recipes, as well as ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (10) from $6.86   
  • New (3) from $19.95   
  • Used (7) from $6.86   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$19.95
Seller since 2006

Feedback rating:

(382)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
PAPERBACK New 1580083250 Ten Speed Press softcover, unused, No marks or defects, (New); bubble-wrapped and mailed in a BOX with free delivery confirmation.

Ships from: New Hartford, CT

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$52.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(259)

Condition: New
Brand New Item.

Ships from: Chatham, NJ

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$60.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(146)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

Ever the innovator, Douglas Rodriguez was the first American chef to give ceviche the attention it deserves, creating such signature dishes as Spicy Shrimp Ceviche with Popcorn and the decadent Squid Ceviche in Black Ink Sauce. His New York restaurant, Chicama, is a temple to the bright, clean flavors of this remarkably simple dish, and patrons crowd around the ceviche bar to marvel at the day's offerings. In THE GREAT CEVICHE BOOK, Rodriguez presents over 50 traditional and contemporary recipes, as well as extensive information on ingredient basics, food safety issues, and suggestions for pairing ceviche with other dishes.• High in protein and low in fat, ceviche is the perfect food for health-conscious cooks not willing to sacrifice flavor.• Douglas Rodriguez's books have sold over 60,000 copies.Reviews“Mr. Rodriguez's reinterpretations of Latin American dishes have made him something of a godfather of contemporary Latin American cooking.” —New York Times“[Rodriguez is] the most important Latin chef in the restaurant world.” —Nina Zagat, Zagat Guides

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781580083256
  • Publisher: Ten Speed Press
  • Publication date: 1/28/2003
  • Series: Star Chefs Series
  • Pages: 160
  • Product dimensions: 4.58 (w) x 10.24 (h) x 0.52 (d)

Meet the Author

Award-winning chef DOUGLAS RODRIGUEZ is regarded as the inventor of Nuevo Latino cuisine. He is the executive chef of OLA in Manhattan and Alma de Cuba in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

the great CEVICHE BOOK


By DOUGLAS RODRIGUEZ with Laura Zimmerman

TEN SPEED PRESS

Copyright © 2003 Douglas Rodriguez
All right reserved.

ISBN: 1580083250


Chapter One

TIRADITOS

You'll find my most straightforward ceviches contained in this chapter. It begins with two simple ceviches, one using sea bass, the other using grouper (pages 24 and 28), which stick primarily to the basic formula of citrus, salt, onions, herbs, and chiles. If you're preparing your first ceviche, start with these. Tiraditos typically include only one type of seafood and represent a rather minimalist approach to ceviche; a pure style where the main prize is the flavor of the fish itself rather than any marinade or garnish ingredients.

Roughly translated, tira means "throw" and ditos means "little bites," or "thrown-together little bites." This is an apt description of these simple, tossed preparations, of any fish or seafood where the components of a classic ceviche-citrus, onion, and herbs-are used only to enhance the flavor of the fish rather than to add any strong characteristics of their own. The exciting part is that the following simple recipes will work with just about any seafood, so feel free to interchange bass with blue fish, salmon with scallops, or mackerel with merluza to match your mood.

During my travels through South America, I have spoken to many individuals who take pride in making ceviches,from home cooks along the Ecuadorian coast to the confident ceviche specialists that work magic at nothing more than roadside carts in Peruvian fishing villages. One especially inspirational friend of mine, Humberto Sato at Costanera 700, or "Coastal Restaurant 700," in Lima, Peru, embraces what I consider a true tiradito philosophy. He is a ceviche expert whose attention to quality ingredients approaches the religious. He is meticulous about choosing his suppliers, preaching that he only buys from certain fishermen whose practices he knows down to the force with which they pull a day's catch out of the water. As Humberto explains, if a fisherman pulls his catch out of the water too quickly, the fish may become stunned, making the flesh too tough for good ceviche.

Anyone I know who's traveling through Peru, I send to Humberto's restaurant. They might question my advice upon first approaching the factory-like building in Lima's rough San Miguel neighborhood. But as the elite, professional crowd there will attest, searching out Humberto's waterfront hideaway will result in a unforgettable afternoon meal.

When I visit Costanera 700, I love to listen to Humberto speak of his ceviche philosophies. He is of Japanese decent, but has lived in Lima for most of his life and considers himself Peruvian. An Eastern sense of discipline and respect for life are certainly a tremendous part of the ceviche tradition that Humberto has helped create, a tradition that countless others have tried to replicate and follow.

Many Americans are unfamiliar with the fact that Peru, and many other Latin American countries, have large Asian populations. So it seems even more logical to draw comparisons between the different forms of sushi and sashimi and the different forms of ceviches. Of course they are both raw-fish preparations. But philosophically, sashimi, or raw fish served virtually unadorned, is the Japanese counterpart of tiraditos. Tiradito ingredients are also often cut into thin slices, similar to sashimi, rather than chopped as in most of the mixtos ceviche recipes.

Walking along the countless docks, piers, and beaches of Central and South America provides unstoppable motivation for creating ceviche. Seeing the incredibly fresh fish, brought virtually from water to table, is what really motivates me to make a simple tiradito ceviche. But you don't have to travel to far-off lands for inspiration. As Humberto suggests, know your supplier; one whom you can trust and who will answer your questions about procurement, freshness, and storage. Of course, as the sixty recipes in this book attest, there are unlimited creative options for ceviche. But if you start with an exquisite piece of fish, these tiraditos are as good as it gets.

FOUR-CITRUS SEA SCALLOPS with CUCUMBER

Sea scallops, or conchitas, are slightly smaller than diver scallops. Strive to get the dry variety, or ones free of any water-collecting preservatives. I prefer to cook with scallops in their shells. Ideally, that's what you're looking for to prepare this recipe, but scallops out of their shell will work just fine. Conchitas cook quickly, so I've added four citrus juices to this dish; the combination has a lower acidity than lime alone and will actually slow down the "cooking" process. The Valencia orange and grapefruit also add a pleasant sweetness.

1 1/2 pounds large sea scallops Juice of 6 limes 1 tablespoon sea salt 1 pink grapefruit Juice of 1 pink grapefruit Juice of 1 Valencia orange Juice of 5 lemons 1 cucumber, cut in half lengthwise, seeded, and thinly sliced into half-moons 3 green onions, thinly sliced 2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh chives 1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh cilantro

Set the scallops in a single layer on a parchment paper-lined baking sheet, cover with plastic wrap, and freeze for about 1 hour, until very firm, but not frozen solid.

Once frozen, remove the scallops from the freezer and slice crosswise into very thin rounds. In a nonreactive bowl, toss the sliced scallops in the lime juice and salt. Cover and refrigerate for 1 hour.

Peel the grapefruit by slicing off the top and bottom, setting it upright on a flat surface, and using a sharp knife to cut away the peel, white pith, and exterior membrane. Cut from top to bottom, following the curve of the fruit; don't cut too deeply into the flesh of the grapefruit. Holding the grapefruit in one hand, run a knife along one of the interior membranes toward the center of the fruit. Do this again along the neighboring membrane to remove each grapefruit section. Repeat until all sections are removed. Roughly chop the grapefruit sections and reserve.

Before serving, drain the scallops, discarding the lime juice. In a clean nonreactive bowl, blend the grapefruit, orange, and lemon juices and gently fold in the reserved grapefruit sections, the remaining ingredients, and the scallops.

Yield: 6 servings

CHILEAN SEA BASS with LEMON OIL

If you're a ceviche novice, this recipe is a very simple starting point. But the simple list of ingredients makes the flavor of the sea bass particularly important, so make sure to get a beautiful piece of fish. The lemon oil is a nice change from typical citrus juice because it adds a bit of richness to the fish's already silky texture. And if you make sure to cut the sea bass thinly, the end result is buttery and subtle.

1 1/2 pounds Chilean sea bass fillet

MARINADE

Juice of 2 lemons 1/2 cup freshly squeezed lime juice 1 tablespoon salt 1/4 cup coarsely chopped fresh cilantro 1/2 red onion, thinly sliced into half-moons 3 tablespoons lemon oil (page 146)

Set the sea bass on a baking sheet, cover with plastic wrap, and freeze for 1 to 2 hours, until very firm, but not frozen solid.

Once frozen, remove the sea bass from the freezer and, using a sharp knife, slice it crosswise very thin. Transfer to a nonreactive bowl and gently toss it with the marinade ingredients. Serve immediately.

Yield: 6 servings

HALIBUT with LEMON and CORIANDER OIL

It's no surprise that halibut works well in ceviche. It actually takes well to virtually any cooking method you can think of: roasting, baking, grilling, frying, you name it. It is for this reason that halibut is my single, favorite Northeastern fish. I just love its meaty, lean texture and versatility. West Coast halibut is also available (usually at a cheaper price), but it's inferior to an East Coast catch. I have to admit that the texture of halibut in ceviche is a bit on the chewy side, but it's still very worth using. In this recipe the slight crunch from the crushed coriander seeds (seeds of the cilantro plant) and their oil lend complementary flavor and just the right amount of pleasing texture. If I had to eat one fish for the rest of my life, it would be halibut.

1 1/2 pounds skinless halibut fillet, cut crosswise into 3 pieces 1/2 cup freshly squeezed lime juice 1 tablespoon salt

CORIANDER OIL

3 tablespoons coriander seeds 1 tablespoon salt 3 tablespoons virgin olive oil

MARINADE

1/2 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice 2 tablespoons finely chopped pickled jalapeños (page 142) 2 tablespoons chopped fresh chives 1/2 cup coarsely chopped fresh cilantro 4 green onions, thinly sliced 1/2 red onion, thinly sliced into half-moons

Set the halibut on a baking sheet, cover with plastic wrap, and freeze for about 2 hours, until very firm, but not frozen solid.

Once frozen, remove the halibut from the freezer and slice it crosswise very thin. In a nonreactive bowl, combine the sliced halibut, lime juice, and 1 tablespoon salt. Cover and refrigerate for 1 1/2 hours.

To make the coriander oil, toast the coriander seeds a dry sauté pan over high heat until they begin to about 4 minutes. Crush the seeds and 1 tablespoon salt with a mortar and pestle. In o small bowl, blend the crushed seeds with the oil and let rest at room temperature.

Before serving, gently toss the halibut and lime juice with the marinade ingredients and drizzle with the coriander oil.

Yield: 6 servings

GROUPER with OPAL BASIL

Grouper is a Florida fish so, because of the years I spent in Miami, I naturally think of it when making ceviche. The practice of freezing a fish to allow for easy, thin slicing is particularly important with grouper since it can be very chewy when eaten raw. If you can find it, use black or red grouper, which are the least tough and the most flavorful varieties.

1 1/2 pounds grouper fillet, skin removed 1/2 cup freshly squeezed lime juice 1 tablespoon salt

MARINADE

Juice of 2 lemons 3 shots Tabasco sauce or to taste 1/4 cup basil oil (page 151) 2 jalopeños, split lengthwise, seeded, and finely diced 10 opal basil or other fresh basil leaves, cut into chiffonade 1 1/2 red onion, thinly sliced into half-moons

Set the grouper on a baking sheet, cover with plastic wrap, and freeze for at least 2 hours.

Once frozen, remove the grouper from the freezer and, using a sharp knife, slice it very thin. In a nonreactive bowl, toss the sliced grouper in the lime juice and salt. Cover and refrigerate for 1 hour. Before serving, add the marinade ingredients to the grouper and lime juice and gently toss.

Yield: 6 servings

SALMON with MUSTARD OIL and SCALLIONS

Salmon is an excellent fish prepared almost any way: cured, smoked, cooked, or raw. Because of this, it is widely popular. If you are hesitant to make a ceviche with some of the more adventurous fish and seafood suggested in this book, this may be a good first ceviche to prepare. The following recipe, my partner Tom Nally's favorite, is simple yet impressive for both ceviche experts and novices.

MARINADE:

1/2 cup freshly squeezed lime juice 1 1/2 teaspoons salt 1/4 cup freshly squeezed orange juice 2 tablespoons mustard oil (page 153) 3 jalapeños, seeds and membranes removed, finely diced 2 tablespoons chiffonade of mint leaves 1/4 cup coarsely chopped fresh cilantro 4 green onions, thinly sliced 2 tablespoons chopped fresh chives

1 1/2 pounds skinless salmon fillet, cut into 1/4-inch dice 1/2 red onion, thinly sliced into half-moons

In a nonreactive bowl, blend all the marinade ingredients. Add the salmon and gently toss. Cover and refrigerate for 1 hour. Before serving, garnish with the red onion.

Yield: 6 servings

SWEET and SPICY MACKEREL

Most gastronomes speak disparagingly of mackerel, due to its reputation for having an overly fishy taste and its designation as the most popular canned fish in the world. But canned mackerel preserved in oil is no comparison to its freshly caught state, which offers a rich, buttery flavor and a beautiful, tasty skin that, if cleaned well, will add a nice chewiness to this ceviche. Mackerel's raw flavor is also far superior to its cooked flavor, accounting for its frequent use in sushi and sashimi.

When buying fresh mackerel, make sure it was caught within a day or two, since its quality deteriorates quickly from rapid fat oxidation. If you press your finger into the fish, it feels firm, and no indentation remains, make haste for your kitchen and get ready to change your opinion about mackerel.

1 1/2 pounds mackerel fillet, skin removed (this is optional), and thinly sliced 1 cup freshly squeezed lime juice 1 tablespoon salt

MARINADE

1 tablespoon honey 1/4 cup freshly squeezed lime juice 1/4 cup freshly squeezed grapefruit juice 1 teaspoon aji amarillo paste (page 151) 1 teaspoon panca pepper paste (page 153)

GARNISH

3 green onions, all of the white and half of the green part, thinly sliced 2 tablespoons chopped fresh chives 3 tablespoons coarsely chopped fresh cilantro 1 small red onion, thinly sliced

In a nonreactive bowl, gently toss the sliced mackerel in the 1 cup of lime juice and salt. Cover and refrigerate for 1 to 2 hours. When ready to serve, drain the mackerel, discarding the lime juice. In a clean nonreactive bowl, whisk the marinade ingredients together; add the mackerel and garnish ingredients and gently toss.

Yield: 6 servings

MERLUZA with PICKLED JALAPEÑOS and LEMON OIL

Merluza is the true Chilean sea bass. It is a very lean, white, and clean-flavored fish that is actually more prized for its raw flavor than its cooked flavor. After cooking, merluza's flesh becomes too soft and often falls apart, but in ceviche it holds up beautifully. If you can't find merluza, you can substitute whiting.

MARINADE

1/2 cup freshly squeezed lime juice 1 1/2 teaspoons salt 1 1/2 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger 2 tablespoons pickled jalapeño chiles (page 142) 1/2 red onion, thinly sliced into half-moons

1 1/2 pounds merluza fillet, skin and bones removed and finely diced

GARNISH

1/3 cup coarsely chopped fresh cilantro 3 tablespoons lemon oil (page 146)

In a nonreactive bowl, blend all the marinade ingredients. Add the merluza and gently toss. Cover and refrigerate for 1 hour. Before serving, garnish with the cilantro and drizzle with the lemon oil.

Continues...


Excerpted from the great CEVICHE BOOK by DOUGLAS RODRIGUEZ with Laura Zimmerman Copyright © 2003 by Douglas Rodriguez
Excerpted by permission. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)