The Great Emergence: How Christianity Is Changing and Why

The Great Emergence: How Christianity Is Changing and Why

3.8 17
by Phyllis Tickle
     
 

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Phyllis Tickle is founding editor of the Religion Department of Publishers Weekly. One of the most respected authorities and popular speakers on religion in America today, she is often quoted and interviewed in such media outlets as the New York Times, USA Today, Newsweek, Time, CNN, C-SPAN, and PBS. A lay eucharistic minister…  See more details below

Overview

Phyllis Tickle is founding editor of the Religion Department of Publishers Weekly. One of the most respected authorities and popular speakers on religion in America today, she is often quoted and interviewed in such media outlets as the New York Times, USA Today, Newsweek, Time, CNN, C-SPAN, and PBS. A lay eucharistic minister in the Episcopal Church and a senior fellow of Cathedral College at the National Cathedral in Washington, she is the author of more than two dozen books, including The Divine Hours prayer manuals and, most recently, The Words of Jesus: A Gospel of the Sayings of Our Lord.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

North American Christianity is presently undergoing a change every bit as radical as the Protestant Reformation, possibly even as monumental as its natal break with Judaism. And it's right on schedule. Tickle, author of God-Talk in America and PW's founding religion editor, observes that Christianity is holding its semimillennial rummage sale of ideas. With an elegance of argument and economy of description, Tickle escorts readers through the centuries of church history leading to this moment and persuasively charts the character of and possibilities for the emerging church. Don't let this book's brevity fool you. It is packed with keen insights about what this "great emergence" is, how it came to be and where it may be headed. Tickle issues a clear call to acknowledge the inevitability of change, discern the church's new shape and participate responsibly in the transformation. Although Tickle's particular focus excludes the dynamic forces of Asian, African and Central/South American Christianity, this is a must-read for anyone seeking to understand the face and future of Christianity. (Oct.)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780801071027
Publisher:
Baker Publishing Group
Publication date:
09/01/2012
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
224
Sales rank:
112,285
Product dimensions:
8.30(w) x 5.50(h) x 0.60(d)

Meet the Author

Phyllis Tickle, founding editor of the religion department at Publishers Weekly, is one of the most highly respected authorities and popular speakers on religion in America today. She is the author of more than two dozen books on the subject, including the recently published The Words of Jesus: A Gospel of the Sayings of Our Lord and The Divine Hours, a series of manuals for observing fixed-hour prayer. She is frequently quoted and interviewed in such media outlets as The New York Times, USA Today, Newsweek, Time, CNN, C-SPAN, and PBS. A lector and lay eucharistic minister in the Episcopal Church, Tickle is a senior fellow of the Cathedral College of Washington National Cathedral. She makes her home on a small farm in Lucy, Tennessee. For more in formation, go to www.phyllistickle.com or www.thegreatemergence.com.

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Great Emergence 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 17 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Tickle's first hypothesis is that the contemporary moment is comparable in significance to the century or more that culminated in the Reformation, and to other significant turning points in the history of the Church, spaced out every half-millennium or so. This idea is not new with her, but the Reformation at least gets a look, so that the person who vaguely remembers learning about it years ago can be reminded of why it was so important. Her second hypothesis regards the present time, attempting to draw the picture of the current "Emergence" from its roots as far back as the 18th century in its intellectual roots, and technologically and socially to the early 20th century. This is perhaps the most memorable part of the book. Third, she reflects on the ways in which the different types of Christian observance have related to one another over in the last century, and how that set of relationships may be shifting and blurring in response to the cultural, social, and technological shifts that have broadened all our horizons. Many books connected to the issues of postmodern Christianity are long on rhetoric and short on content. This is the opposite, and will reward readers who slog past the opening slow chapter or two with plenty to consider and talk about.
Pilates_mama More than 1 year ago
This surprisingly concise book gives a survey of the history of major changes in the Christian church and the cultural changes within which they occurred. It goes further to predict where the current changes in Christianity may be headed. This book would be of interest to anyone who is distressed about the future of Christianity in today's world, not just to those who consider themselves part of the nominal Emergent Church.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a good and introductory book explaining the challenges facing modern day Christianity in the forms of social, cultural and intellectual upheaval. It is useful, and is meant for the knowledgeable lay reader, thus there are not many footnotes or even a bibliographic essay. The latter would have been quite useful, though, in providing greater context.
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Phyllis Tickle combine simplicity of heart with complexity of thought. Her faith shines through her work as she reveals God and society as she see them.
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MWorrell More than 1 year ago
I think it's pretty obvious to the unbiased reader of "The Great Emergence" that Tickle's arrangement of history, her beliefs about what is most important and why, and her assessment of where we're at and where we are going are all easily called into question. Since she both defines and applies her own terms as they relate to the monumental shift she describes, and then incorporates virtually everything we can possibly observe into it, it becomes apparent early on that if you don't just relax and listen to what she has to say, you will not get through the book. Bill Moyers' impact on the Christian church has been comparable to Darwin and Freud? Really? Better to just let it go and read on. Ignoring entirely the Bereans, Tickle portrays sola scriptura as nothing more than a pragmatic concoction of the Reformers. But I think a strong argument can be made for the authority of scripture on the most practical grounds imaginable, with no mention of the Reformation (or literacy, or translations, or printing) whatsoever. As it relates to the issues of slavery and women's suffrage, Tickle is too eager to fix the blame for the church's errors on a belief in the authority of scripture, rather than on the validity of their interpretations. She also focuses far too little on how deeply scripture informed and motivated those who fought bravely for advancement in those areas, and the moral traction that scripture gave to their arguments. To set the leading of the Spirit and biblical authority in opposition, or competition, you must assume they are in conflict. I would like to know what that point of conflict is, what the Bible specifically says that is in error, and what the Holy Spirit has instead revealed that shows the authority of scripture to be problematic. I understand the idea that there may be a persistent tension in evidence, and that not everything will resolve cleanly in matters of faith, but if that's the case, why on earth do we need to let go of biblical authority? I recently have been reading a critique of John Shelby Spong, a collection of essays written by ten Episcopal scholars. In places, it traces the bishop's ideas from early articles appearing in The Christian Century to his current heretical stances. Wherever you place Spong's ideas in relationship to modern or postmodern notions, his decline from iconoclast to apostate has been accompanied by reasoning that is arrestingly similar to that of Tickle (and other Emergent luminaries). In fact, they appear to be coming to many of the same conclusions.
JREwing More than 1 year ago
Great book. But why is it not on the Nook? It's on the Amazon Kindle.