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The Great Game (Bookman Histories Series #3)
     

The Great Game (Bookman Histories Series #3)

4.0 1
by Lavie Tidhar
 

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When Mycroft Holmes is murdered in London, it is up to retired shadow executive Smith to track down his killer - and stumble on the greatest conspiracy of his life. Strange forces are stirring into life around the globe, and in the shadow game of spies nothing is certain. Fresh from liberating a strange alien object in Abyssinia - which might just be the mythical Ark

Overview

When Mycroft Holmes is murdered in London, it is up to retired shadow executive Smith to track down his killer - and stumble on the greatest conspiracy of his life. Strange forces are stirring into life around the globe, and in the shadow game of spies nothing is certain. Fresh from liberating a strange alien object in Abyssinia - which might just be the mythical Ark of the Covenant - young Lucy Westerna, Holmes' protégé, must follow her own path to the truth while, on the other side of the world, a young Harry Houdini must face his greatest feat of escape - death itself.

As their paths converge the body count mounts up, the entire world is under threat, and in a foreboding castle in the mountains of Transylvania a mysterious old man weaves a spider's web of secrets and lies.

Airship battles, Frankenstein monsters, alien tripods and death-defying acts: The Great Game is a cranked-up steampunk thriller in which nothing is certain - not even death.

File Under: Steampunk [ End Of Days | Only The Beginning | The Ark | Insane Thrills ]

e-book ISBN: 978-0-85766-200-2

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Achieves moments of surprising depth and beauty, with real insights into human history and psychology as well as the immense and varied wealth of writing in the last half of the 19th century. It’s a virtuoso performance."

– Locus

"A clever, superior thriller, inventive and entertaining."
– SFX

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780857661999
Publisher:
Watkins Media
Publication date:
01/31/2012
Series:
Bookman Histories Series , #3
Pages:
416
Product dimensions:
4.10(w) x 6.80(h) x 1.40(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Israeli-born writer Lavie Tidhar has been called an "emerging master" by Locus magazine, and has quickly established a name for himself as a short fiction writer of some note. He has travelled widely, living variously in South Africa, the UK, Asia and the remote island-nation of Vanuatu in the South Pacific, and his work exhibits a strong sense of place and an engagement with the literary Other in all its forms.

Lavie is also the creator of the acclaimed website dealing with SF writing from non-English speaking countries, World SF News. The author lives in Tel Aviv, Israel.

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The Great Game: The Bookman Histories, Book 3 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Philip_K_Jones More than 1 year ago
This is a series of three novels set in a “Steampunk” Universe that includes a large population of Nineteenth Century fictional and historical characters. By ‘large,’ I mean that I lost track during the first volume and merely took occasional notes during the later volumes. For example, Chief Sitting Bull appears in the same volume as Erich Weiss, aka Harry Houdini and Irene Adler is a Scotland Yard Inspector, keeping her eye on Fagin and Oliver Twist. The three volumes in the series are, respectively, “The Bookman,” “Camera Obscura” and “The Great Game.” All three volumes are, more or less, stand-alone publications. On the other hand, I have a number of questions after completing the third volume, so all of the answers are definitely NOT included in the books. The main theme of the series revolves around Mycroft Holmes and his Intelligence Organization. Many other Sherlockian characters appear as well as an unruly mob of other personages. One really needs a scorecard to keep track. The author also has a habit of making readers work for understanding of the environment. Every once in a while, some character will summarize a part of history, either recent or ancient, so that readers can orient (not ‘orientate’) themselves. Mostly, though, the characters talk about more immediate concerns as do people involved in active lives so readers are left to catch up on their own. I found this aspect more interesting than most fictional settings because it makes a reader think. Meanwhile, the action continues and events keep happening. The three volumes occur in 1888, in 1893 and in 1899. Many characters appear in all three volumes and some explanations are offered. I retain a number of serious questions, such as “What happened to Smallpox” and “Where did Amerigo Vespucci learn to pilot a ship?” There are also open questions about who is on which side of what. There seem to be more ‘sides’ than players and there are a real ocean full of players. Needless to say, the action takes place all over the place and even in some unexpected places. At base, this is an action series. Agents, counteragents, retired agents and secret agents wander in and out, change sides, switch masters and shoot it out with each other at the drop of a hat. It is difficult to bring up any subject without revealing some of the mysteries that are part of the story. As an example, there was a revolution in France in the late eighteenth Century. It was called “The Quiet Revolution.” Doctors Frankenstein and Jekyl are working together, sort of. Milady DeWinter and the Comte de Rochefort are still (or again) in business, working for the French Government, in between other clients. One hint, when the author talks about a “Vespucian” you can translate that as “American.” This is a fun series. There are lots of interesting characters, stolen from everywhere, as much action as can be kept track of and a whole slew of questions left unanswered. Familiar characters pop up in the oddest places for even odder reasons and familiar places all look just a little bit odd. If you can figure out what actually happened, please drop me a note. I’m still a bit puzzled. Reviewed by: Philip K. Jones, February 2012