Great Health Care: Making It Happen / Edition 1

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Overview

Great Health Care is enlightening and entertaining. It’s a must read for physicians, patients, health policymakers and administrators, and the interested public—-anyone who wants to understand what great health care is, and how we might build it together.

The authors share their stories and motivations and the methods they have used to transform care for their own patients within their own practices and health systems. They thoughtfully explore how we got into this mess, how we can get out of it, and the barriers to making it happen.
“It is not only the impact of chronic diseases on our health and economy that draws us to this subject. It is the intriguing and rewarding potential for improving the status quo through redesigning how chronic disease care is provided and paid for.” (Timothy Harrington, MD)
"You can't do things differently until you see things differently." (Eric Newman, MD)
“We start people on the road to recovery, but the 12 weeks of cardiac rehabilitation is just the warm-up period. The really important part is what happens afterward.” (Richard Lueker, MD, Beth McCormick, MS)
“We believe the extra-ordinary efforts of our program coordinators are key to our clients’ wellbeing and our unusually low readmission rate.” (Kathi Farrell, RN, BSN, PHN, Kathleen Sullivan, RN, MSN)
“In real life, we are not usually given the chance to have a do-over. But we are given the chance to continuously improve. With the right skill sets, and the right partners, we can transform.” (Eric Newman, MD)

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Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Carole A. Kenner, PhD, RN, FAAN (Council of International Neonatal Nurses)
Description: This book tackles the complex problems of chronic disease care and healthcare delivery system failures. It focuses on why the U.S. healthcare delivery model does not work and what it would take to "fix" the system. The book's approach is unique in that it makes chronic disease the backdrop of the healthcare delivery discussions.
Purpose: The overarching goal is to address the healthcare system of today — its problems and the impact on patient outcomes — and describe success stories that have impacted change. The hope is to increase the awareness among health professionals, policy makers, and the lay public about today's healthcare failure and how this could be turned around to achieve "great health care."
Audience: Health professionals, consumers, and policy makers are the intended audience, but the book also can be used by students in the health professions, health policy, or public policy.
Features: First, the book describes chronic illness and explains why this is used as the context for the discussions of healthcare delivery. Subsequent sections address healthcare delivery systems and management aspects of chronic diseases. Specific success stories using the most common chronic illnesses illustrate that great care is possible in this country. The final section addresses next steps and what it will take to change the delivery system. Notable features of the book are the colorful graphs and the human interest stories that illustrate the most salient points. The color makes the book pop and draws readers through what could be dry material.
Assessment: There are many books that address the U.S. healthcare system. This book is unique in its approach and its delivery. The almost informal style helps readers to visualize the dilemmas faced in healthcare today. This is a good addition to an ever-growing body of literature.
From The Critics
Reviewer: Carole A. Kenner, PhD, RN, FAAN (Council of International Neonatal Nurses)
Description: This book tackles the complex problems of chronic disease care and healthcare delivery system failures. It focuses on why the U.S. healthcare delivery model does not work and what it would take to "fix" the system. The book's approach is unique in that it makes chronic disease the backdrop of the healthcare delivery discussions.
Purpose: The overarching goal is to address the healthcare system of today — its problems and the impact on patient outcomes — and describe success stories that have impacted change. The hope is to increase the awareness among health professionals, policy makers, and the lay public about today's healthcare failure and how this could be turned around to achieve "great health care."
Audience: Health professionals, consumers, and policy makers are the intended audience, but the book also can be used by students in the health professions, health policy, or public policy.
Features: First, the book describes chronic illness and explains why this is used as the context for the discussions of healthcare delivery. Subsequent sections address healthcare delivery systems and management aspects of chronic diseases. Specific success stories using the most common chronic illnesses illustrate that great care is possible in this country. The final section addresses next steps and what it will take to change the delivery system. Notable features of the book are the colorful graphs and the human interest stories that illustrate the most salient points. The color makes the book pop and draws readers through what could be dry material.
Assessment: There are many books that address the U.S. healthcare system. This book is unique in its approach and its delivery. The almost informal style helps readers to visualize the dilemmas faced in healthcare today. This is a good addition to an ever-growing body of literature.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781461411970
  • Publisher: Springer New York
  • Publication date: 12/14/2011
  • Edition description: 2012
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 258
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Table of Contents

Prologue: Sooner or Later, We are All Patients – Timothy Harrington and Eric Newman
Section I: Caring for Chronic Diseases – How we got into this mess, and why we need to get out of it Introduction.Timothy HarringtonChapter 1. Why Chronic Diseases? – Timothy HarringtonChapter 2. How Has the U.S. Health System Evolved? – Timothy HarringtonChapter 3. Why has the U. S. Health System Become What It Is? – Timothy HarringtonChapter 4: Making Chronic Disease Care Great – Timothy Harrington
Section II: How to Effect Change in Health Care – If It Doesn’t Fit, Use a Larger Hammer Introduction.Eric NewmanChapter 5. Building Systems of Care – Eric NewmanChapter 6. Problem Solving – Eric NewmanChapter 7. Testing and Implementing Solutions – Eric Newman
Section III: Managing Chronic Disease – You Can’t Do things Differently Until You See Things Differently Introduction.Eric NewmanChapter 8. Managing Complex Processes – Timothy Harrington Chapter 9. Managing Medical Information: Tools, Rules, and What’s Cool – Eric Newman Chapter 10. Measuring Processes and Outcomes of Care – Timothy HarringtonChapter 11. Teaming: Everyone has a Role to Play – Eric NewmanChapter 12. How Providers Should Be Paid – Eric Newman
Section IV. Success Stories Told by Champions – Boldly Going Where Few Have Gone BeforeIntroduction.Timothy HarringtonChapter 13. Diabetes:Everyone’s Number One Priority – Richard Beaser, Kenneth Snow, Jo-AnneRizzotto, Julie Brown, and Martin AbrahamsonChapter 14. Osteoporosis: Breaking Bones is Not Inevitable – Richard DellChapter 15. Rheumatoid Arthritis: Diagnose Early and Treat to Target – John CushChapter 16. Heart Failure:Reducing Readmissions – Kathi Farrell and Kathleen SullivanChapter 17. Chronic Kidney Disease: Changing the Mean by Changing the Mien – Jerry Yee, Mark Faber, and Sandeep SomanChapter 18. Asthma:Identifying and Treating High-Risk Patients – Michael FoggsChapter 19. Cardiovascular Disease: Reducing Risk Factors – Richard Lueker and Beth McCormickChapter 20. Obesity: The Elephant in the Room – Karen Cooper, Philip Schauer, Stacy Brethauer, and Sangeeta KashyapChapter 21. Palliative Care & Hospice: Advancing the Science of Comfort, Affirming the Art of Caring – Martha Twaddle
Section V. Controversies in Redesigning Chronic Disease Care Introduction.Timothy HarringtonChapter 22. Myths and Miscreants – Eric NewmanChapter 23. Improving Care versus Transforming Care – Eric NewmanChapter 24. Translational Research or Industrial Process Improvement: A False Choice – Timothy HarringtonChapter 25. The Patient Centered Medical Home or System-based Care: Another False Choice – Timothy HarringtonChapter 26.Preparing Physicians with Optimal Processes and Process Improvement Skills – Timothy HarringtonEpilogue: Join with Us – Eric Newman and Timothy Harrington

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