The Great Migrator: Robert Rauschenberg and the Global Rise of American Art

Overview

In 1964, Robert Rauschenberg, already a frequent transatlantic traveler, became even more peripatetic, joining the Merce Cunningham Dance Company as costume and set designer for its first world tour. Rauschenberg and the company visited thirty cities in fourteen countries throughout Europe and Asia. During the tour, he not only devised sets and costumes but also enacted his own performances and created works of art, often using local materials and collaborating with local art communities. In The Great Migrator, ...

See more details below
Hardcover
$25.29
BN.com price
(Save 15%)$29.95 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (15) from $15.00   
  • New (10) from $20.07   
  • Used (5) from $15.00   
Sending request ...

Overview

In 1964, Robert Rauschenberg, already a frequent transatlantic traveler, became even more peripatetic, joining the Merce Cunningham Dance Company as costume and set designer for its first world tour. Rauschenberg and the company visited thirty cities in fourteen countries throughout Europe and Asia. During the tour, he not only devised sets and costumes but also enacted his own performances and created works of art, often using local materials and collaborating with local art communities. In The Great Migrator, Hiroko Ikegami examines Rauschenberg's activities abroad and charts the increasing international dominance of American art during that period.

Unlike other writers, who have viewed the export of American art during the 1950s and 1960s as another form of Cold War propagandizing (and famous American artists as cultural imperialists), Ikegami sees the global rise of American art as a cross-cultural phenomenon in which each art community Rauschenberg visited was searching in different ways for cultural and artistic identity in the midst of Americanization. Rauschenberg's travels and collaborations established a new kind of transnational network for the postwar art world—prefiguring the globalization of art before the era of globalization.

Ikegami focuses on Rauschenberg's stops in four cities: Paris, Venice (where he became the first American to win the Grand Prize at the Venice Biennale), Stockholm, and Tokyo. In each city, she tells us, Rauschenberg's work encountered both enthusiasm and resistance (which was often a reaction against American power). Ikegami's account offers a fresh, nonbinary perspective on the global and the local.

Read More Show Less

What People Are Saying

From the Publisher

"Ikegami's book offers not one but two significant interventions into the scholarship of modern and contemporary art. The first lies in the author's archival recovery of key primary source materials from Venice, Stockholm, and Japan. The second concerns the construction and reconstruction of a global/transnational history of art, an enterprise that is no longer simply modern or American but migrates freely between established conceptual and historiographical categories. This study helps to pave the way forward for a methodologically evolving field that takes a global perspective on world art history. And in this context, Rauschenberg emerges as 'the great migrator' -- a uniquely powerful figure of transience, transformation, and transnationalism."
Marcia Brennan, Associate Professor of Art History, Rice University; author of Curating
Consciousness: Mysticism and the Modern Museum

The MIT Press

"Offering a pre-history of the global contemporary, Ikegami traces Rauschenberg's tour with the Cunningham dance troupe in the mid-1960s to articulate the explosive impact,
xenophilic embrace, and paranoid protectionism stimulated by American art abroad. This is a pioneering work of transnational art history, packed with juicy details and meticulously researched across Europe and into Japan." Caroline Jones, Director of History, Theory, and Criticism Program at
MIT

The MIT Press

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780262014250
  • Publisher: MIT Press
  • Publication date: 8/27/2010
  • Pages: 296
  • Product dimensions: 7.80 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Hiroko Ikegami, an art historian who specializes in American art and the postwar globalization of the art world, is Associate Professor in the Graduate School of Intercultural Studies at Kobe University.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)