The Great Nursery Rhyme Disaster

The Great Nursery Rhyme Disaster

5.0 1
by David Conway
     
 

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Little Miss Muffet is bored & tired of her same old nursery rhyme so off she goes into the next pages of the book to find another rhyme to star in. Ouch — falling down the hill with Jack & Jill is painful, climbing up a clock is embarrassing & running away with a spoon infuriates the dish. Funny, wacky mixups for ages 3-7.

Overview

Little Miss Muffet is bored & tired of her same old nursery rhyme so off she goes into the next pages of the book to find another rhyme to star in. Ouch — falling down the hill with Jack & Jill is painful, climbing up a clock is embarrassing & running away with a spoon infuriates the dish. Funny, wacky mixups for ages 3-7.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Sheilah Egan
Using many well-known nursery rhymes the author takes us on a romp after Little Miss Muffet decides that she is bored sitting on a tuffet and she has "had quite enough of that scary little spider." Employing different fonts and text sizes, as well as lots of appearances of little creatures carrying placards with witty comments on the action, the fun is greatly enhanced by the wildly exuberant illustrations that practically exhort the reader to rejoice in the silliness of Miss Muffet's antics. We see her marching with the Grand Old Duke of York's men—she announces that is "way too much marching for my taste." Next we see her with Jack and Jill—"way too painful." The mouse from Hickory, Dickory, Dock is eager to let her take over climbing up the clock but she feels it makes her look "ridiculous!" She runs quickly from Johnny Flynn and Tommy Stout after a dunking in their well. She continues to look for a suitable rhyme but begins to cause a great deal of tumult when she runs away with the spoon. The dish is indignant and begins to holler and shout that she should not be allowed to take over this important position. The ruckus spills over into the next poem and then the king's pie-full of black birds begin to flap about and add to the hilarity. Before too long we have the Queen of Hearts, and Peter Piper mixed up with the Itsy Bitsy Spider and the three blind mice. Old Mother Hubbard falls off a wall and things are out of control. Miss Muffet slips quietly back to her own poem and shrieks "Eeeeek!" as the spider sits down beside her. Lots of fun to read aloud and, of course, youngsters "get it." Reviewer: Sheilah Egan
School Library Journal

PreS-Gr 2

A whimsical look at the world of Mother Goose. Little Miss Muffet, cute as a button, is tired of the same old, same old. Looking to escape the drudgery of her life, she seeks excitement in other rhymes. True to the old adage, "the grass is always greener," a wide-eyed Miss M. tries, with little success, to find a place in the "Grand Old Duke of York," "Jack and Jill," "Hickory, Dickory, Dock," "Ding, Dong, Bell," "Hey Diddle, Diddle," "Sing a Song of Sixpence," and "The Queen of Hearts." Witty prose and updated interpretations are complemented by Williamson's exuberant illustrations. Colorful, comical, and energetic, the characters race through the pages to the story's end, in which sweet Miss Muffet concludes that she no longer needs a change. That is, until a certain spider comes along...-Trish Sabini, Ossining Public Library, NY

Kirkus Reviews
Little Miss Muffet turns a series of familiar nursery rhymes on their heads when, sick of that scary spider, she escapes into the pages of the book to find a new rhyme. But the Grand Old Duke of York marches too much, getting water with Jack and Jill gives her a headache and she gets all wet sharing a page with Johnny Flynn and Tommy Stout. While Miss Muffet rather enjoys running with the spoon, the dish feels somewhat put out and raises a fuss, which spills over onto the other pages. In the ensuing chaos, Miss Muffet tiptoes back to her familiar rhyme. Williamson's signature style uses combinations of basic shapes to create her characters. Bold colors and patterns and a typeface that echoes the action complete the effect, creating a visually busy tableau in which the nursery-rhyme characters run amok. Reminiscent of the craziness of Jane Breskin Zalben's Hey, Mama Goose, illustrated by Emilie Chollat (2004), and Alison Jackson's If the Shoe Fits, illustrated by Karla Firehammer (2001), this fits the genre with zany precision. (Picture book. 3-7)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781589254381
Publisher:
Tiger Tales
Publication date:
09/28/2012
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
1,107,289
Product dimensions:
10.37(w) x 10.25(h) x (d)
Lexile:
AD770L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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Great Nursery Rhyme Disaster 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
"Children already familiar with nursery rhymes will delight in The Great Nursery Rhyme Disaster (Hodder) by David Conway.through gorgeous pages filled (by Melanie Williamson) with colour, action, incident and pattern." -Sunday Times "Children who are already familiar with nursery rhymes should enjoy The Great Nursery Rhyme Disaster. Writer David Conway tells what happens when Little Miss Muffet gets bored and decides to visit some other rhymes; Melanie Williamson's vivid, witty illustrations match the story perfectly."- Irish Times "A great way to introduce small children to some of the best-loved nursery rhymes and great fun to read aloud."-Askews Library Services "Vivid use of colour and a witty storyline will entertain adults and children alike."-Bookseller "Children will love the topsy-turvy mix-ups in this delightful book packed with visual humour and wordplay."-Junior Magazine "This vibrant picture book is brimming with visual and verbal humour plus plenty of beloved rhymes. Stylish pictures make this a delicious spin on familiar stories."- Red House Books The Great Nursery Rhyme Disaster is a delightfully sweet book that is totally enjoyable to read. 5/5"-totz2teens "This rib-tickling book, illustrated by Melanie Williamson is brimming with visual and verbal wit."- Puffin Book Club "Mother Goose has never been funnier..."-Tiger Tales " This book would be great fun to share with a group, as the image details are clear enough to be spotted from a short distance, and children might enjoy reciting familiar rhymes as they go through the story. "- Writeaway "The Great Nursery Rhyme Disaster is a children's picturebook that turns traditional nursery rhymes on their head! Charming, cartoony illustrations add the perfect twisted-fairy-tale touch to this lighthearted adventure."- Midwest Book Review