The Great Omission [NOOK Book]

Overview

The last command Jesus gave the church before he ascended to heaven was the Great Commission, the call for Christians to "make disciples of all the nations." But Christians have responded by making "Christians," not "disciples." This, according to brilliant scholar and renowned Christian thinker Dallas Willard, has been the church's Great Omission.

"The word disciple occurs 269 times in the New Testament," writes Willard. "Christian is found three times and was first introduced ...

See more details below
The Great Omission

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$10.99
BN.com price

Overview

The last command Jesus gave the church before he ascended to heaven was the Great Commission, the call for Christians to "make disciples of all the nations." But Christians have responded by making "Christians," not "disciples." This, according to brilliant scholar and renowned Christian thinker Dallas Willard, has been the church's Great Omission.

"The word disciple occurs 269 times in the New Testament," writes Willard. "Christian is found three times and was first introduced to refer precisely to disciples of Jesus. . . . The New Testament is a book about disciples, by disciples, and for disciples of Jesus Christ. But the point is not merely verbal. What is more important is that the kind of life we see in the earliest church is that of a special type of person. All of the assurances and benefits offered to humankind in the gospel evidently presuppose such a life and do not make realistic sense apart from it. The disciple of Jesus is not the deluxe or heavy-duty model of the Christian -- especially padded, textured, streamlined, and empowered for the fast lane on the straight and narrow way. He or she stands on the pages of the New Testament as the first level of basic transportation in the Kingdom of God."

Willard boldly challenges the thought that we can be Christians without being disciples, or call ourselves Christians without applying this understanding of life in the Kingdom of God to every aspect of life on earth. He calls on believers to restore what should be the heart of Christianity -- being active disciples of Jesus Christ. Willard shows us that in the school of life, we are apprentices of the Teacher whose brilliance encourages us to rise above traditional church understanding and embrace the true meaning of discipleship -- an active, concrete, 24/7 life with Jesus.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780061744747
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 10/13/2009
  • Sold by: HARPERCOLLINS
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 54,864
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Theologian and scholar Dallas Willard has long been an eloquent voice for the relevance of God in our daily lives. His groundbreaking books Hearing God, Renovation of the Heart, and The Spirit of the Disciplines forever changed the way thousands of Christians experience their faith. He is a professor at the University of Southern California's School of Philosophy and has held visiting appointments at UCLA and the University of Colorado. He lives in southern California.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 6 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(3)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 26, 2006

    Rediscovering the Great Comission

    If Dallas Willard's magnus opus, The Divine Conspiracy is the main course, then his latest book, The Great Omission is the dessert. I have been looking for a book to introduce Dr. Willard's thoughts to my friends and now I have it. This compilation of previously published articles, speeches, and afterwords with some original work and revision, is a masterpiece of post-modern Christian thought. I call Dallas Willard, professor of Philosophy at the University of California, the 'Protestant Pope' and we would do well to consider The Great Omission another Encyclical. Here he touches on his favorite topics: discipleship, spiritual formation and transformation, and spiritual discipline. The glue that holds these varied pieces together is Professor Willard's genuine and apparent love for God and for His son, Jesus. Just how should we act, and react, if we truly love God and want to walk with Jesus? What kind of people would we be? How would we look if we were 'disciple-making disciples' and not just 'convert-making converts?' This gentle and humble man is a personal trainer for the Body of Christ. Jesus mandates disciple-making in the last commandment to his followers, which would include you and me. Dallas Willard calls this command the 'Great Omission' since the churches of today have forgotten this and focus instead on gaining new members only, what I call the 'numbers game.' Of course, numbers means money, and through the process of sin management, control. Focusing on this omission, Dr. Willard delivers a cure in this book, which involves those topics listed above. One-by-one he leads us through the processes, always supported by Scriptures, of discipleship, disciple-making, spiritual transformation, spiritual formation, and spiritual discipline. What he says, however, is just a reaffirmation of what Christ lived, said, and died for 2000 years ago. Dr. Willard celebrates this throughout the book. Not one to acknowledge just an 'intellectual nod' to personal salvation, Professor Willard understands that walking with Christ means movement, at least putting one foot in front of the other. There are practical means for this that he discusses here but more detailed practices can be found, for example, in his The Spiritual Disciplines. But I like his emphasis on memorizing Scriptures, a sin of omission I find in myself. There is also an emphasis on using one's body as the mechanism for helping God extend His domain here on earth. After all, we are dealing with spiritual concepts in a physical world. 'Go¿' said Jesus, and Dr. Willard understands that as an action verb. After reading The Great Omission I bought four more copies for friends, including pastors. I recommend this book to everyone but especially to two groups of people: those Christians who hunger for a closer walk with God's son and to those open-minded intellectuals who, while not (yet) Christians, feel like they are on the outside looking in on something interesting at least, fantastic at best. God bless you, Dr. Willard, for this book and for these opportunities of disciple-making myself.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 2, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 19, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 7, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 13, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 9, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)