Great Readings in Clinical Science: Essential Selections for Mental Health Professions / Edition 1 by Scott O. Lilienfeld, William T. O'Donohue | | 9780205698035 | Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Great Readings in Clinical Science: Essential Selections for Mental Health Professions / Edition 1

Great Readings in Clinical Science: Essential Selections for Mental Health Professions / Edition 1

by Scott O. Lilienfeld, William T. O'Donohue
     
 

ISBN-10: 0205698034

ISBN-13: 9780205698035

Pub. Date: 08/15/2011

Publisher: Pearson

An accessible guide to clinical practice

Great Readings in Clinical Science: Essential Selections for Mental Health Professions is the first book to focus exclusively on teaching students how to think scientifically about clinical practice.

These user-friendly and accessible readings provide students with

Overview

An accessible guide to clinical practice

Great Readings in Clinical Science: Essential Selections for Mental Health Professions is the first book to focus exclusively on teaching students how to think scientifically about clinical practice.

These user-friendly and accessible readings provide students with basic critical thinking skills needed to evaluate evidence concerning the assessment, causes, and treatment of mental disorders, and will allow students to become better informed consumers of the literature in clinical psychology, counseling psychology, social work, psychiatry, and other allied disciplines. It will also be an indispensable guide to graduate students in training, as it will help show them how to think critically about psychotherapy and other domains of clinical practice. The book consists of classic selections about both science in general and clinical science in particular, and should be required reading for all students who aspire to become mental health professionals. Great Readings in Clinical Science is intended for undergraduates and graduate students, as well as teachers, researchers, and practicing clinicians.

Teaching & Learning Experience

  • Improve Critical Thinking – Classic readings focus on scientific thinking as applied to clinical research and practice.
  • Engage Students – Formal academic readings are combined with light/humorous sections to create a user-friendly guide.
  • Explore Research – A diverse selection of readings allows students to examine the science behind clinical practice.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780205698035
Publisher:
Pearson
Publication date:
08/15/2011
Pages:
216
Product dimensions:
8.40(w) x 10.60(h) x 0.60(d)

Table of Contents

IN THIS SECTION:

1.) BRIEF

2.) COMPREHENSIVE


BRIEF TABLE OF CONTENTS:

I. The Scientific Attitude: An Introduction

II. Clinical Psychology: Why a Scientific Approach Matters

III. Clinical Science as a Safeguard against Human Error

IV. Interpreting Evidence in Clinical Psychology

V. Thinking Scientifically about Assessment and Psychotherapy


COMPREHENSIVE TABLE OF CONTENTS:

I. The Scientific Attitude: An Introduction

Sagan, C. (1995). Wonder and skepticism. Skeptical Inquirer, 19 (1), 24-30.

Feynman, R. (1974, June). Cargo cult science. Engineering and Science, 37 (7), 10-13.

Shermer, M. (1994). How thinking goes wrong: Twenty-five fallacies that can lead us to believe weird things. Skeptic, 2 (3), 42-49.

Schafersman, S.D. (1994). An introduction to science: Scientific thinking and the scientific method. Free Inquiry Website. http://www.indiana.edu/~educy520/readings/schafersman94.pdf

Hempel, C. (1966). The case of Dr. Semmelweis. In Philosophy of natural science. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice Hall.

II. Clinical Psychology: Why a Scientific Approach Matters

McFall, R.M. (1991). Manifesto for a science of clinical psychology. Clinical Psychologist, 44 (6), 75—88.

O'Donohue, W. T. (1989). The (even) bolder model: The clinical psychologist as metaphysician-scientist-practitioner. American Psychologist, 44, 1460-1468.

O’Donohue, W.T. & Henderson, D. (1999). Epistemic and ethical duties in clinical decision-making. Behaviour Change, 16, 10-19.

Gambrill, E. & Dawes, R.M. (2003). Ethics, science, and the helping professions: A conversation with Robyn Dawes. Journal of Social Work Education, 39, 27-40.

Lilienfeld, S.O. (1998). Pseudoscience in contemporary clinical psychology: What it is and what we can do about it. The Clinical Psychologist, 51, 3-9.

III. Clinical Science as a Safeguard against Human Error

Arkes, H.R. (1981). Impediments to accurate clinical judgment and possible ways to minimize their impact. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 49, 323-330.

Crumlish, N., & Kelly, B.D. (2009). How psychiatrists think. Advances in Psychiatric Treatment, 15, 72-79.

Dawes, R., M., Faust, D., & Meehl, P.E. (1989). Clinical versus actuarial judgment. Science, 243, 1668-1674.

Meehl, P.E. (1973). Why I do not attend case conferences. In P.E. Meehl, Psychodiagnosis: Selected papers (pp. 225-302). Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. (Excerpt)

IV. Interpreting Evidence in Clinical Psychology

Ayllon, T., Haughton, E., & Hughes, H. B. (1965). Interpretation of symptoms: Fact or fiction? Behaviour Research and Therapy, 3, 1-7.

Maher, B.A. (1978). A reader’s, writer’s, and reviewer’s guide to assessing research reports in clinical psychology. Journal of

Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 46, 835-838.

Kendler, K.S. (2005). Toward a philosophical structure for psychiatry. American Journal of Psychiatry, 162, 433-440.

Gigerenzer, G. et al. (2009, April). Knowing your chances: What health stats really mean. Scientific American Mind, 44-51.

V. Thinking Scientifically about Assessment and Psychotherapy

Lilienfeld, S.O., Wood, J.M., & Garb, H.N. (2006). Why questionable psychological tests remain popular. Scientific Review of Alternative Medicine, 10, 6-15.

Harkness, A.R., & Lilienfeld, S.O. (1997). Individual differences science for treatment planning: Personality traits. Psychological Assessment, 9, 349-360.

Sechrest, L., & Smith, B. (1994). Psychotherapy is the practice of psychology. Journal of Psychotherapy Integration, 4, 1-29.

Beyerstein, B.L. (1999). Social and judgmental biases that make inert treatments seem to work. Scientific Review of Alternative Medicine, 3, 16-29.

Stuart, R. (2004). Twelve suggestions for developing multicultural competence. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 35, 3-9.

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