×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

The Great Secret (Large Print 16pt)
     

The Great Secret (Large Print 16pt)

5.0 1
by L. Ron Hubbard
 
Fanner Marston was raised a slave as a child, became a petty street thief as a teen, and now masters his own craft and crew as a grown man. He's also gone completely mad. Driven by privation, with a vicious greed and slavering lust for power, Marston alone of forty men has survived the perilous trek through a blistering desert to the magical city of Parva, where

Overview

Fanner Marston was raised a slave as a child, became a petty street thief as a teen, and now masters his own craft and crew as a grown man. He's also gone completely mad. Driven by privation, with a vicious greed and slavering lust for power, Marston alone of forty men has survived the perilous trek through a blistering desert to the magical city of Parva, where legend says a secret awaits which will give him absolute control over the Universe. However, Marston finds the key to all power is not at all what he expected. . . .

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781459629431
Publisher:
ReadHowYouWant, LLC
Publication date:
10/03/2011
Edition description:
Large Print
Pages:
156
Product dimensions:
7.00(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.33(d)

Meet the Author

L. Ron Hubbard (1911 ¿ 1986), often referred to by his initials, LRH, was an American author and the founder of the Church of Scientology. Hubbard established his career as a writer with science fiction and fantasy novels, including the novel Battlefield Earth, which was adapted into a feature film in 2000. Starting in the 1950s, Hubbard created a system called Dianetics, which is a wide-ranging set of doctrines and practices that became the foundation of the religious movement Scientology.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

The Great Secret (Large Print 16pt) 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
tomjohnson1940 More than 1 year ago
“Golden Age Science Fiction At Its Best.” Actually, this book contains four stories: THE GREAT SECRET, which was originally published in SCIENCE FICTION STORIES, April 1943; SPACE CAN; THE BEAST, and THE SLAVER. In THE GREAT SECRET Fanner Marston is the last survivor of a team searching for the mythical Parva, a lost civilization holding the secrets to the universe. Whoever can find those secrets will control the universe. Struggling through the desert half dead under two suns, Marston finds the lost city, only to learn the first secret to his grasp of power may also mean his death. SPACE CAN, the Menace, is a US Destroyer category ship leading a convoy under the command of Lt. Carter. Two enemy ships attack, and the old space can must take them out in a space battle that will likely destroy his ship and men. THE BEAST is a monster threatening the village Tohyvo on the planet Venus. The blue natives are in need of a great white hunter and the government sends Ginger Cranston, a man who has never failed. But the planet is known for its giant animal life, so what is the man-size beast that attacks Cranston and almost kills him? A man without fear now has fear, but he plans on tracking the monster and killing it. But is he ready for the revelation once he comes fact to face with the Beast? The final story is THE SLAVER, and my favorite (though THE GREAT SECRET is a runner up). Voris Shapadin, captain of the slaver, is parked on Earth and his men are capturing slaves to be returned to his home planet, Lurga. They are attacked by a small, slender man, but quickly capture him. He is a high class, named Kree Lorin of Falcon Crest, a soldier and blue blood. Also held captain is the girl Kree was trying to win, Dana of Palmerton, a peasant girl. Chained and locked in cells, the ship departs Earth with their human cargo, but Kree is determined to free himself and Dana, while killing as many Lurga slavers as possible. The four stories in this collection was a lot of fun, and though they could have been altered as adventure stories, and sea adventures instead of space opera, they worked well as SF. Highly recommended.