Great Vegetarian Cooking under Pressure: Two-Hour Taste in Ten Minutes

Great Vegetarian Cooking under Pressure: Two-Hour Taste in Ten Minutes

by Lorna J. Sass
     
 

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Under pressure to prepare a quick, nutritious dinner? Under pressure to reduce your fat and cholesterol? When the pressure's on for a great vegetarian meal on the run, turn to Lorna Sass's second guide to the safe and delicious use of the pressure cooker.

Following the phenomenal success of Cooking Under Pressure, this collection of recipes dispels

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Overview

Under pressure to prepare a quick, nutritious dinner? Under pressure to reduce your fat and cholesterol? When the pressure's on for a great vegetarian meal on the run, turn to Lorna Sass's second guide to the safe and delicious use of the pressure cooker.

Following the phenomenal success of Cooking Under Pressure, this collection of recipes dispels the myth of the difficult-to-use pressure cooker — which is in fact easier and faster than the microwave — and shows how vegetarian fare can be vibrantly colorful and full of flavor!

Bursting with rich soups, hearty stews and casseroles, zesty curries, and flavor-packed chilis, Great Vegetarion Cooking Under Pressure brings together over 150 recipes, most with cooking times of under ten minutes. Arrive in Provence with a two-minute soupe au pistou laced with garlic and fennel; serve up an elegant zucchini bisque with tomatoes and fresh basil in just five minutes; or prepare a polenta good enough for a palazzo in only ten minutes. There are also scores of perfect vegetable side dish recipes, with an instructive chart detailing how to prepare everything from artichokes to zucchini.

Lorna Sass devotes special attention to grains — a vital part of the healthy diet — and shows how brown rice, millet, couscous, quinoa, and bulgur can turn from gourmet store items into staples of your pantry. Whether it's Risotto with Broccoli Rabe and White Beans in five minutes, or Mediterranean Vegetable Couscous in just six, these recipes lock in delicious nutrition without tying up precious time. There's even a section about the splendid desserts that are possible with the pressure cooker, like Banana Pudding Cake and Pumpkin Bread Pudding.

Filled with informative sections about the equipment, ingredients, and language of pressure cooking, suggestions for theme menus, and mail-order resources, this compendium of high-quality, high-fiber, low-fat (and mostly cholesterol-free) dishes will become an essential guide for today's bustling cook.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Sass (Cooking Under Pressure), award-winning pressure-cookery expert, returns to the kitchen with this vegetable opus. Healthy cooks in a hurry will find themselves huddling around it. After introductory chapters on the techniques of pressure cooking and the ingredients most necessary to it, Sass goes on to unveil sections on soups, grains, desserts, bean dishes, and a variety of vegetable fare: coriander carrots; Indian-style parsnips (with carrots as an alternative choice); even sea palms with shiitake mushrooms. The book shows a decidedly international stripe, and wears it jauntily without frightening off readers who may be more used to the humdrum. Especially note the triple fennel rice. Sass saves our time once again, and colorfully.
Library Journal
Sass is the author of Cooking Under Pressure (LJ 11/15/89), an excellent guide to pressure-cooker cooking, and of Recipes from an Ecological Kitchen (LJ 6/15/92), on low-fat, high-fiber vegetarian fare. Now she has combined these two interests in a collection of flavorful soup, vegetable, grain, and bean recipes that can be made in the pressure cooker, most in a fraction of the time they would ordinarily take: Garlic Mashed Potatoes in only three minutes of cooking time, Risotto with Porcini in five, Tarragon-Scented White Bean Soup in just eight. There are quick vegetable purees, elegant bisques, and even some desserts. Most of the recipes will appeal to vegetarians and nonvegetarians alike. Recommended. [HomeStyle Bks. alternate.]

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780688123260
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
10/28/1994
Pages:
288
Sales rank:
369,061
Product dimensions:
7.37(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.97(d)

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Saffron Risotto with Vegetables Du Jour

5 minutes high pressure

Here is a good basic risotto that provides considerable versatility. The saffron adds a beautiful golden color, which acts as a backdrop for any cooked vegetable in season. Nice choices are peas, asparagus, and broccoli.

1 tablespoon olive oil
1/2 cup finely chopped leeks (white and light green parts), shallots, or onions
1 1/2 cups arborio rice
3 1/2 to 4 cups vegetable stock
Generous 1/4 teaspoon saffron threads
1 teaspoon salt, or to taste
1 1/2 to 2 cups chopped cooked vegetables
2 to 3 tablespoons minced fresh parsley
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese or 1 to 3 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice or 1 to 3 teaspoons balsamic vinegar
Freshly ground pepper to taste

Heat the oil in the cooker. Cook the leeks over medium-high heat, stirring frequently, for 1 minute. Add in the rice, stirring to coat with the oil. Add 3 1/2 cups of the stock (stand back to avoid sputtering oil), the saffron, and salt.

Lock the lid in place. Over high heat, bring to high pressure. Lower the heat just enough to maintain high pressure and cook for 5 minutes. Reduce the pressure with a quick-release method. Remove the lid, tilting it away from you to allow any excess steam to escape.

Stir in the vegetables, parsley, and Parmesan (if using). If the risotto isn't creamy, stir in a bit more stock. Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly, until the rice achieves the desired consistency (it shouldbe tender but chewy) and the vegetables are thoroughly heated. Stir in lemon juice or vinegar (if using) and pepper. Serve immediately in shallow soup bowls.

Serves 6 as an appetizer, 4 as a main dish


Mediterranean Vegetable Couscous

1 minute high pressure, 5 minutes standing

In this recipe, the vegetables are quickly pressure-cooked; then the couscous is added and left to steam for 5 minutes. There's a fair amount of chopping involved (so sharpen your chef's knife or get out the food processor), but after that it's a breeze. Any combination of vegetables can be used, so please consider this recipe a rule of thumb (see Tips).

This is a substantial dish that requires little more than a salad to make a complete meal. Leftovers are terrific at room temperature when drizzled with a bit of olive oil and lemon juice and garnished with cornichons.

1 to 2 tablespoons olive oil
2 teaspoons minced garlic
1 cup coarsely chopped onions
1 1/2 cups boiling vegetable stock or water
1 small fennel bulb, trimmed and cut into 1/2-inch strips (about 2 1/2 cups; chop and reserve the fronds), or 2 large celery ribs, halved lengthwise and cut into 1/2-inch slices, plus 1/2 teaspoon whole fennel seeds
1 large red bell pepper, seeded and cut into thin strips
1 large carrot, halved lengthwise and cut into 1/2-inch slices
1/4 pound medium fresh mushrooms, quartered or sliced
2 medium zucchini, cut into 1-inch slices
1 1/2 cups coarsely chopped fresh or canned (drained) plum tomatoes
1/3 cup pitted oil-cured black olives
1 1/2 teaspoons dried basil leaves
1 1/2 teaspoons dried oregano leaves
1 teaspoon salt, or to taste
1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/8 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
1 to 3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
1 1/2 cups whole-wheat couscous
1/4 cup minced fresh basil or parsley

Heat 1 tablespoon of the oil in the cooker. Cook the garlic over medium-high heat, stirring constantly, just until browned. Immediately add the onions and cook, stirring frequently, for 1 minute. Add the stock (stand back to avoid sputtering oil), fennel bulb, red bell pepper, carrot, mushrooms, zucchini, tomatoes, olives, basil, oregano, salt, cinnamon, and pepper.

Lock the lid in place. Over high heat, bring to high pressure. Lower the heat just enough to maintain high pressure and cook for 1 minute. Reduce the pressure with a quickrelease method. Remove the lid, tilting it away from you to allow any excess steam to escape.

Stir in 1 tablespoon of balsamic vinegar and the couscous. Immediately replace (but do not lock) the lid and allow the mixture to steam in the residual heat until the couscous is tender, about 5 minutes.

Stir well to distribute the ingredients as you add the fennel fronds, basil, additional tablespoon of olive oil (if using), and just enough additional balsamic vinegar to make the flavors pop. If desired, you may also add a bit more salt.

Serves 6

Great Vegetarian Cooking. Copyright � by Lorna Sass. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.

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